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Thread: First DSLR purchase

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    First DSLR purchase

    I'm in the market for a DSLR.

    Currently I'm using a Canon SX30is, but have been looking for a while to upgrade.

    I don't have a huge budget and for this reason I am most likely going to go grey market.
    I'm only in Australia for another 4 months anyway, after this time am I going to be any better off with an Aus warranty than grey market? I'll most likely be in Europe (possibly back home in NZ).

    Having used Canon for the last couple of years, and having played around with a couple of Canon SLR's briefly, I'm definitely thinking I'll buy canon.

    I'm looking at getting either an 1100d or 550d, both would initially be with standard IS twin lens kit, with the view of adding another couple of lenses over the next 6-12 months.

    I mostly shoot landscapes, wildlife, sports and aviation.

    So, would I be better off spending a touch more and getting the 550d or saving a little on the 1100d and putting this toward glass later?

    The problem I have is that both are crop sensors and I want to get a wide lens at some stage, so I'm really going to need to get something along the lines of 10-22mm??

    Just looking for everyones thoughts on the most suitable body....and should I get something like a twin lens kit? Or are there more suitable options on a similar budget.

    A lot of questions here I know, and I realise most have been asked before but I'm hoping to get some answers a little more specific to my situation.

    jayjay

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    there are wide angle lenses around the suit the crop sensor, so that'll fix ya little red wagon. as for what model to buy i always say get the best you can afford. dont be afraid to shop around other brands too.

    for wildlife kyou are going to have to go a long one of at least 400 or 500mm and this can cost a bit. so keep that in mind when you come to purchasing a lens. fast primes in that length are going to cost you the same as a deposit for a mortgage.

    hope your questions get answered.

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    Personally, I'd go for the 600D.
    It has some very worthwhile extra features (better rear screen which also flips out, wireless flash control, better sensor etc) over the 550, and doesn't cost much more.

    The twin lens kit is pretty cheap, and is a bit of a bargain if you can't afford really good glass first up, and they will get you going and then you can find out what you like to photograph most and then you can get better glass from there.

    A 600D with twin lens kit should cost you around $860 delivered if you buy grey, and the 550 around $700, but the 550 is an old model now.
    While I'm a Canon shooter, don't discount the Nikons (3100 and 5100) either, as they are also pretty good cameras.
    All my photos are taken with recycled pixels.
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    I have to agree with Bennymiata, try and go for the 600D, from what I have seen on grey market there is little difference in price. No problems with UWA lens either for cropped sensors. I have a sigma 10-20mm and it is a worthy lens but moving forward I would recommend the Canon 10-22 if you have a little extra cash at the time.
    When I bought my initally 400D with the 18-55 IS and 55-250mm IS lens kit I found the 18-55 very disappointing and struggled with IQ, however; the 55-250 was quite a good lens for a kit lens. Just an FYI.
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    Looks like about $100 difference in price between 550d and 600d, where I will most likely buy from.

    On paper, to me at least, the differences between the 2 look pretty minimal. Of course, having never had a DSLR before I may overlook certain things.

    I think it'll most likely be between those 2 with kit lenses to start though.

    Thanks for the input

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    The 550D is a good camera, don't get me wrong, bu tthe 600D is worth the extra $100.

    Sometimes extra features like a better sensor and screen won't mean to much to a novice, but in 12 months time, when you've gotten some experience, they certainly will.
    Especially if you plan to get some good lenses later on.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bennymiata View Post
    Personally, I'd go for the 600D.
    It has some very worthwhile extra features (better rear screen which also flips out, wireless flash control, better sensor etc) over the 550, and doesn't cost much more.
    Articulated Screen +
    Wireless Flash +
    Better Sensor??????

    The 550D, 600D, 60D and 7D ALL share the same sensor, so the image off the sensor should be pretty much the same across the range (all other things being equal).
    Last edited by unistudent1962; 17-02-2012 at 1:34pm.
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    I purchased a 1000D as my intro into the digital market. I didn't go overboard with lenses since I was able to use them from my canon film camera. I didn't want a huge investment since my film days were pretty pittyful and I had no idea what I liked to photograph. I also picked up a 50mm 1.8 on a friends recommendation.

    Jump ahead 2 years. I love it but now find myself wanting. I took a few classes, about 6000 photos and now have an idea what I am looking for in a camera and lenses.

    Am I dissapointed? No, I felt the inital investment was better than the 7D I was looking at the time, I might not have ever really used the gear and it would have been a bigger outlay. So don't be scared of the 1100D if you are not sure of your direction, if you do know, and it looks like you might as you have listed your likes definately get the 600D.

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    As said 600D is a good camera (I have one and love it), the flip screen is actually incredibly useful, especially when shooting at awkward angles but it isn't much different from the 550D on paper. Don't worry about the crop sensor, it's perfect for your aviation, sports and wildlife photography as it gives you more reach. That 55-250 kit lens is suprisingly good and can deliver reasonably sharp images right through the focal range.

    For landscaping you can pick from the Canon 10-20mm, Sigma 10-20mm or Tokina 11-16mm which are all graet lenses and work well on a crop body. Main differences are the focal range (10mm on the Canon and Siggy, but only 5mm on the Tokina), however the Tokina is a tad sharper and experiences only a small amount of barrel distortion compared to the more complex (harder to correct) Moustache distortion in the Sigma and Canon. I am biased though as I have the Tokina, and love it dearly.
    Ryan

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