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Thread: food photography, micro tripod

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    food photography, micro tripod

    Here's the situation. DSLR in dark restaurant. No flash allowed. Working distance about 30cm. Need about f4 to get DOF wanted. Looking at 0.5-1s exposures.

    Some sort of support is required. Has anyone used any tiny tripod in similar situations? I've not seen anything small enuf to put on the table and be able to hold say 3KG of camera+lens. You still want to be low to the table.

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    I've tried a few of these little table-top tripods, and all the ones I tried were useless with a DSLR.
    However, I haven't tried the new Manfrotto one, which looks to be better than the others.

    Have you thought about using a bean bag, or even a box to hold the camera on the table?
    All my photos are taken with recycled pixels.
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    whenever I shoot for restaurants and commercial stuff, its always done to the best natural lighting possible with a bit of fill flash thrown in, cant you negotiate with the management and chef to do the shoot at a much more ideal time than to shoot in very dark conditions? Is this an official client or a fun thing? Because if its the former then you would expect them to organize this at a more ideal time

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    I got a SLIK mini tripod. It secure my 1DIII and 100L macro without problem. Note: tripod collar on the lens.

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    just for fun. a bean bag won't keep its shape I guess. I looked at the SLIK mini , its rated Maximum Load: 1.24 kg is a bit low for a dslr? It's min height 15cm is a bit on the high side at my working distance
    hmm

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    A bean bag will keep its shape as long as you want it to, as long as you don't move it.

    They are a very stable platform for your camera.

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    hm, instead of a tripod, what do you think of using a panel light?

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/108-LED-5600...item4aafccef23

    I duno how bright that is, 80lux - how can I work out camera settings from that?

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    12 inch hardwood about 4 inched wide and ¾ inches thick (floorboard is ideal) with a bolt mounted and counter bored upwards at one end, (so it is flush underneath).
    Mount something like a ball head or pistol grip onto the bolt.

    For 1 second exposure your consistent downward pressure on the hardwood board, should provide sufficient stability: use mirror up and remote release.

    I also have a 12 inch square hardwood plate with the blot in the middle for better balance for a larger rig when I need to be very low, very quickly.

    The “floorboard” can be G-Clamped easily, if the camera is heavy and you want to set up the shot with two hands free or you do not have an assistant: but for a table shot as you described, you should be able to work with one hand setting up.

    Also I have G-Clamped the device to tops of ladders or flat railings, for extra height, especially when shooting large groups.

    Hardwood is better than (thinner) metal as for the length, metal becomes more springy than hardwood; and hardwood is lighter even though thicker, than for example aluminum, which I also have used but it required ribs, or to be a "U" section for stability.

    WW

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    Not answering the question asked: but you could put a sturdier tripod on the floor and not on the table and still be "low to the table."

    WW

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    I'm not much for woodworking nor do I have the tools, but that's an idea. All I'd need is a screw to interface my ballhead.

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