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Thread: Snow Protection help

  1. #1
    Account Closed AutumnCurl's Avatar
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    Snow Protection help

    Hiya,

    I am going to the snow in July and i am trying to work out how to protect my camera.
    I have googled and have conflicting answers - half said dont worry about other half said use a plastic bag...

    it there some type of product i can buy? any one have experience or recommendations?

    thanks
    i currently have a d5000 and a few prime lenses.

  2. #2
    Member markjaffa's Avatar
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    Something like this would obviously work, but it would be considered over kill by many. http://www.thinktankphoto.com/produc...ain-cover.aspx Other companies make similar products - most cheaper, some more expensive. If you search for camera rain cover on eBay, you can find cheap throw away ones for $7.
    Canon 5D Mk II - gripped, Samyang 14mm f2.8, Canon 16-35mm f2.8L, 50mm f1.2L, 100mm Macro f2.8L, 70-200mm IS II f2.8L, Gitzo CF tripod and Gitzo CF monopod, Acratech GP Ballhead, Manfrotto Video Fluid Head, Intervalometer, and lots of other stuff!

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    The real question is, what exactly are you doing in the snow? Are you expecting to be shooting whilst it's actually snowing? Are you just mainly concerned about the camera getting wet while it's in your camera bag?

    If you are shooting in snowing conditions, you'd want to protect your camera like it's raining if it isn't weather sealed. If the weather is clear and you are just concerned about it getting wet from melted snow, either have a water proof camera bag, or drop the whole camera bag in a water proof stuff sack inside another bag.

    The next thing would be to just make sure you give your camera time to adjust to different temperatures. Eg. If you go from inside to outside after a long period of time, let your camera's temperature adjust to the ambient temperature and not just pull it out straight away as you can get condensation forming.

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    I'm gonna hijack this.

    Going snowboarding next week. I'm probably not gonna be taking photos while its snowing.. or even on the fields coz I'll prob stack it. I got a lowepro slingshot 200 so I figure this might be ok to take boarding. I've got a d90 with 17-55mm 2.8(which I'm too afraid to take) and a 50mm 1.8 and 18-105mm kit lens... which both might be going.

    But I'm worried about the condensation thing and hardening/cracking of rubber parts? So do I just leave the camera in my bag for 30 mins before taking it out after a change of temp?

    Like the OP I've had so many random/conflicting googled answers...
    - Tim

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    I've skied with a compact camera for years now. Only time I've had any kind of issue is in Canada when the temps were well below freezing. Just had to keep the camera warm and take it out really quickly! If it was out for too long, sometimes it wouldn't work. But otherwise, no issues.

    no way would i consider taking an SLR on the slopes! Not to big-note myself, but I'm a very good skier. Unfortunately, other people overestimate their ability and can put you and your gear at risk.

  6. #6
    Sir Rattus79 - The Proclaimant
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    just keep a spare set of batteries in your pocket (nice and warm)
    Greg Bartle,
    I have a Pentax and I'm not afraid to use it.
    Pentax K5
    Sigma 10-20 | Tamron 17-50 F:2.8 | Sigma 50 F:1.4 | Sigma 70-200 F:2.8 Plus a bunch of Ye Olde lenses


    Would you like to see more?
    http://flickr.com/photosbygreg

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    mmm. I dont have a spare d90 battery. Never needed one and probably never will - except now lol.

    well I spose I can fidn out how long I got when I get there.

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    Member cfm's Avatar
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    I take quite a lot of photos in the snow, usually XC skiing. I carry the DSLR in a LowePro snout bag, with an additional belt-strap to stabilise it.
    One successful method I have used is to take a large ziploc bag, cut a round hole in the end slightly smaller than the diameter of your lens. Use a UV filter or lens hood on the lens. Turn the ziploc bag inside-out. Push the end of the lens through the hole. Using electrical tape, tape the edges of hole to the filter/hood. Turn the bag back around. The lens and camera will be inside the bag, with just the lens filter/hood sticking out. Cut a small hole for the viewfinder. Keep the bag zipped up.
    This is not 100% waterproof, but will help cut down a lot on moisture. It's a little cumbersome, won't last for ever, and doesn't work well with the camera strap, but what do you expect for $2.

    I've recently moved to a Pentax K7 and lens, which is 'weatherproof'. I also have a CottonCarrier harness, which is great.
    Last edited by cfm; 03-08-2011 at 11:27am.

  9. #9
    Member Zonda's Avatar
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    The best tip i can give is that when you shoot out in the snow put your camera in a plastic bag before you head back inside and do it up. Once inside leave your camera in the bag for a little while otherwise you will end up with condensation build up. By letting the air inside slowly heat up around your camera in the bag you won't have a moisture problem. I will say this usually isn't that much of a problem here in Australia as it doesn't get that cold during the day but if you do some long exposure work at night it might be worth taking into account.

    On the other hand I shoot when camping in the back country and i've never used any sort of protection and never had a problem. i would not worry about it too much unless you get snow on your camera then walk in somewhere warm and it melts whilst still on the camera.

    There was discussion on this exact topic on the TWIP podcast sometime in the last 1/4 of last year if you're prepared to hunt it out as they discussed it extensively.


    Cheers,

    David.

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    Thanks for the replies guys. NZ skiing isnt that cold and I haven't needed to bother with the ziplock bag thing yet. I've kept it out on the ride home in the car and thats usually enough time to adjust coz the temp adjusts slowly (and put it in my bag if it gets warm in the car). Havent had any problems.

    Thanks for the the info guys. I didn't end up taking it on the slopes, just at the base. It took me a little longer to get the hang of snowboarding. Will probably plan for some action shots next time. Do you guys usually take HDR on the moutnain? It seems a good thing to do for the light I'm getting.

    Whats TWIP? I wouldn't mind taking a look at that podcast.

  11. #11
    Member Zonda's Avatar
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    TWIP is "This Week in Photography" i've actually stopped subscribing because it is very gear focused but it did have the occasional jem.
    http://www.thisweekinphoto.com/

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    A second battery i think is essential no matter where you are but especially in cold environments

  13. #13
    Member Zonda's Avatar
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    Couldn't agree more driverkelly. Keep the second battery inside your inner layer jacket / puffer near your chest and not in your backpack or similar otherwise when it's time to use it, if its really cold it will be dead as well. I often keep both batteries in my inner pocket and put them in when i want to shoot. Also once the first battery dies swap it out with the other and i find after an hour or so of sitting in the warmth of your pocket it will give you some more shots.

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