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  1. #1
    Administrator (Site Owner) ricktas's Avatar
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    (NTP) : Shutter Speed Challenge : 2011

    Another in our series of challenges for the AP members learning how to use their cameras. So if you are New To Photography, give these challenges a go, learn to get off Auto Mode, and understand how camera features work, and interact with each other.

    This challenge to our members that want to learn to take control of their digital camera is based on the Learning Centre topic : Experimenting with Shutter Speeds.

    We would like you to set your camera to Shutter Speed mode (usually called S). Check your camera manual in need, on how to set your camera to Shutter Speed mode. Using your camera in this way is called "Semi-Automatic", cause we are going to let you set one of the camera settings and the camera set the rest. This allows you to concentrate on the shutter speed component and get an understanding of how shutter speed affects your resultant photos, without having to consider the other camera controls.

    By using the NTP Learning Plan, working your way through it, along with posting photos to the member's photos forums, and taking on board the critique and feedback, you can learn to master your camera and become a better photographer.

    THE CHALLENGE: We want you to go out and take two photos of the same subject. One at a shutter speed of 1/250th second or faster, and one at 1/25th of a second, or slower. Then post both photos here, explaining what you learnt from using the different shutter speeds. Just a quick note, at 1/25th of a second or slower, you will need to stabilise your camera with a tripod, or stable surface (fence post, car roof, etc).

    There is also a good example of what a slower shutter speed does in this water example, to help you achieve your photos and understanding of shutter speed for this challenge. By gaining an understanding of how shutter speed affects your photos, you will learn to improve, and know when to use either a slow of fast shutter speed.

    The full New To Photography Learning Centre is in the Ausphotography Library, under New To Photography

    Looking forward to seeing your two photos presented for the challenge and your discussions about what you have learnt from the challenge, and how changing the shutter speed can visually affect the resultant photos. Also remember to look at what changing the shutter speed does to the other camera settings (particularly aperture) when photos are taken in semi-auto shutter speed mode. What happens to the aperture, and why does it happen.

    Enjoy the challenge, have fun taking your photos. Looking forward to seeing what you come up with and what you discover about how shutter speed can dramatically change the same scene.
    RICK
    Constructive Critique of my photographs is always appreciated
    Nikon, etc!

    www.tassiephotos.com

  2. #2
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    Hello Rick. i took them inside ( raining here) at 1/250 F4.8 ISO 1400 and 55mm The background is blurred and the picture darker. The camera has focused bringing the cow more to the front or made it the main focus. Better DOF?

    1/25 f14 ISO 1000 55mm the slower shutter speed keeps the shutter open longer and lowered the apature to f14 and the ISO to 1000. So at f14 the background and stool are more in focus and everything seems lighter. Hope someone will explain it better than me!!


    _DSC0222 by kathy.hawkins, on Flickr


    _DSC0223 by kathy.hawkins, on Flickr
    Kathy

    Using a Nikon D90 and 18-200mm VR lens

  3. #3
    I am new and have started working through the learning plan and the challenges. I am having trouble with this challenge. When i take a photo with a fast shutter speed no problems with the photo. But when i slow the shutter speed down to 1 second/8 seconds etc the photo ends up with a lot of light and if i take it with a shutter speed of 30 secs there is no picture only white. I was trying to take a photo of our water feature on our pool so i could see the difference with the water with the different shutter speeds. It was a sunny day. Can anyone tell me what I am doing wrong. I tried changing the ISO settings but that didn't help. Not too sure what I am doing wrong and why there is no picture. thanks

  4. #4
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    Juanny are you using your camera on the semi auto mode that lets you adjust the shutter speed only, with your camera automatically applying the other settings, or are you shooting in manual completely?

  5. #5
    i think i am shooting in semi auto. I am shooting on the TV mode on my camera pentax K200 which is shutter priority. Not shooting in manual mode.

  6. #6
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    ok, so when you say a fast shutter speed and a slow one, what are you using. I notice you said you tried 30 seconds? Re-read the challenge at the top of this thread, it said take one at 1/250th and another at 1/25th. try doing that.

  7. #7
    Ok. I have had another go. I have taken two photos one at 1/250th and 1/20th. I was suprised at how different the two photos were. The one taken at 1/250th was a lot darker that than the one at 1/20th. Is this because the shutter speed is slower at 1/20th therefore this lets in more light so therefore it is brighter? And is this why when i experimented with the slower shutter speeds previously eg 8 seconds/30 seconds that i had so much light in the picture. I have been playing around with the shutter speed a bit and I found if I use a 30 second shutter speed at night that I don't have a problem. Is this a simple case that in different conditions that I need to consider other functions such as ISO/aperture when playing around with shutter speeds in order to get the picture i want.


    IMGP8094 by juanny3, on Flickr


    IMGP8095 by juanny3, on Flickr

  8. #8
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    well done, you have learnt how shutter speed affects the photo. Yes you are right in that the shutter speed, aperture and ISO all work together to get the exposure. By learning this and how each works, and how they affect each other, you are moving forward with your photography and towards using your camera in manual mode. By having an understanding of how all three interact, you will learn how to control each shot to get the creative result you want, not what your camera thinks you should, as it does on Auto.

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