User Tag List

Thanks useful information Thanks useful information:  0
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Beginner tackling fuzzy edges

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    27 Dec 2010
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    87
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Beginner tackling fuzzy edges

    Hi, mucking about with contrasts and b&w I notice some diagonal edges are fuzzy. Original and blow up, below. Can these be removed in pp?

    Cheers,
    Justin
    Attached Images Attached Images
    wonder & serenity through the pinhole in my shoebox.

  2. #2
    Ausphotography Site Sponsor/Advertiser OzzieTraveller's Avatar
    Join Date
    12 Oct 2009
    Location
    Forster- Tuncurry, eastern Australia
    Posts
    1,600
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    G'day Justin

    To my knowledge mate - no ... there is no way to completely remove these 'fuzzy edges'
    What you are seeing is the horizontal rows of pixels picking up the colour change between a "dark bit" and a "light bit"

    The more pixels the sensor has, the finer are the pixels and the less pronounced visible effect - sure, but when you mix howizontals with diagonals, you'll always get this effect to some degree
    Whether you can -or need to- remove it via pp, I think the answer is 'no'

    Regards, Phil
    Of all the stuff in a busy photographers kitbag, the ability to see photographically is the most important
    google me at Travelling School of Photography
    images.: flickr.com/photos/ozzie_traveller/sets/

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    12 Feb 2008
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    7,831
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    These are called jaggies and are often due to over sharpening
    Darren
    Gear : Nikon Goodness
    Website : http://www.peakactionimages.com
    Please support Precious Hearts
    Constructive Critique of my images always appreciated

  4. #4
    Administrator ricktas's Avatar
    Join Date
    24 Jun 2007
    Location
    Hobart
    Posts
    15,640
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    If you print you will not notice these unless you have tried to print to big. Print ink 'bleeds' and merges with the droplets beside each other and they will not appear in a print generally. If they do you are printing to big for the size of the image.
    "It is one thing to make a picture of what a person looks like, it is another thing to make a portrait of who they are" - Paul Caponigro

    Constructive Critique of my photographs is always appreciated
    Nikon, etc!

    RICK
    My Photography

  5. #5
    Member
    Threadstarter

    Join Date
    27 Dec 2010
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    87
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks Phil, I shall watch my diaganols & howizontals. : )
    Thanks Kiwi, will re-visit the sharpening. That explains why my cat's whiskers became 'jaggies' in another shot.
    Thanks Rick, good to know. May be a while before we get to printing anything, but I'll cut & paste that to the book-of-secrets.

  6. #6
    A royal pain in the bum! arthurking83's Avatar
    Join Date
    04 Jun 2006
    Location
    the worst house, in the best street
    Posts
    8,185
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    That enlarged view looks to be more than 100%(zoomed in) view.

    When pixel peeping it pays to never go beyond the 100% view point.. there is simply no reason to do so.

    When editing, there is an advantage in zooming in deeper.. as deep as 2000%, to get fine detail edited the way you want it to be, but for viewing, the effort is wasted.

    so, if this closeup is a 400% view, then what you see is simply normal stuff, and no cause for concern.

    if you want more detail, use a longer focal length or get closer. If you want a larger print, use a larger(more Mp) camera or create a stitch/pano montage.
    When you hear or see the term 3x digital zoom in a P&S camera, this is basically what it is and does.
    Nikon D800E, D300, D70s
    {Nikon} -> 50/1.2 : 500/8(CPU'd) : 105/2.8VR Micro : 180/2.8ais : 105mm f/1.8ais : 24mm/2ais
    {Sigma}; ->10-20/4-5.6 : 50/1.4 : 12-24/4.5-5.6II : 150-600mm|S
    {Tamron}; -> 17-50/2.8 : 28-75/2.8 : 70-200/2.8 : 300/2.8 SP MF : 24-70/2.8VC


  7. #7
    Member
    Threadstarter

    Join Date
    27 Dec 2010
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    87
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks arthurking83, I notice the fuzziness looking at pic #1 and I find it distracting. image#1 is at 50mm, cropped slightly. image#2 is highly enlarged but not for any other purpose than to highlight what I perceive as a problem in #1. I realise I am too picky. And image#1 is not something I'd print, as it is an exercise in contrasts, CPLs and B&w. As a beginner I hadn't heard of jaggies before. In computer games one can overcome these jaggies with anti-aliasing. I had hoped there might be a simple CS5 tool that anti-aliases (for the want of a better word).
    Since medium format is not within budget in my pre-lotto period, I shall try out the longer fl as you suggest or get a ladder. : )
    Much appreciated advice nonetheless.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •