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Thread: Colour film

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    Colour film

    A few colour pictures i had developed before I realised that it was going to be too expensive to start shooting colour film in high quantities
    Mixture of kodka gold 400 and proimage iso100

    pictures are lacking a bit of contrast due to poor quality scanner
























    1DIII, 5DII, 15mm fish, 24mm ts-e, 35L,135L,200L,400L,mpe-65mm
    Film: eos 300, pentax 6x7

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    Ausphotography Regular junqbox's Avatar
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    really like #6, with a little adjustment of position, it would come up very well.

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    Nice shots mate, love the birds in flight. It's not cheap, but I don't find colour negatives to be too expensive to develop - I don't have a problem with paying around $13ish a roll here. E-6 (slide) and true black and white are another matter though - around $25 and $30 per roll Although, I do like the fact that my originals are negs/slides rather than relying on CDs, DVDs or HDDs - I can make digital copies of them if required, and any that I make can be (almost) limitless resolution...

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    what are true black and whites?

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    Member geck's Avatar
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    There's black and white film that can be developed in colour chemistry, such as Kodak BW400CN and Ilford Pan X (I think), and then there're 'true' b&w films such as HP4, HP5+, Delta 3200 (all by Ilford) and some others which must be developed in seperate black and white chemistry. Apparently it is really easy to do at home, but cause it is seperate chemicals only pro labs will do it and charge a fortune for the priviledge. I'm pretty sure that Michael's in Sydney do it, and I think most Camera House stores can get it done (up here thay have to send it away though).

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    Quote Originally Posted by geck View Post
    There's black and white film that can be developed in colour chemistry, such as Kodak BW400CN and Ilford Pan X (I think), and then there're 'true' b&w films such as HP4, HP5+, Delta 3200 (all by Ilford) and some others which must be developed in seperate black and white chemistry. Apparently it is really easy to do at home, but cause it is seperate chemicals only pro labs will do it and charge a fortune for the priviledge. I'm pretty sure that Michael's in Sydney do it, and I think most Camera House stores can get it done (up here thay have to send it away though).
    yep it really is very easy! the chemicals are pretty cheap too

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    A good thing about using film is that you think twice and even thrice before you press the button. I'm still using film, and occasionally E6.
    Alive and still clicking - apologies to PSQ.
    Living and working in the Roaring Forties
    Assorted cameras of all sizes and shapes including Pentax K (the original), MX, Z1,K20D; 50mm 1.2, 35mm 2.0, 85mm 1.8

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    Quote Originally Posted by StanW View Post
    A good thing about using film is that you think twice and even thrice before you press the button. I'm still using film, and occasionally E6.
    i completely agree. Makes you think about composition and sub ject alot!

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    It is even possible to develop your color film at home, never tried, but it apparently just required to be very careful with temperature (around 30 degrees if I remember well) so you need a aquarium heater (or something similar). I don't shoot much color anymore, and when I do I usually just bring the film to any camera place and ask for the development (without prints), this way it only cost few bucks. I then have to scan everything. One day, I will get back to color, I have an E6 film which has been waiting for a long time ! Going back to your photos, I love the first one (would have prefer without the wings cutted and without the seagull in the background but this is a great capture!) and I love the last one !
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