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Thread: Motor Sport and Lens

  1. #1
    Member barnzy's Avatar
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    Motor Sport and Lens

    Hello All,

    I'm starting to get into the motor sport scene with taking photo's however the standard lens that I have just doesn't cut it. I own the Nikon D60 Camera which came with the twin lens pack however looking at getting a few others lens.

    Firstly I'm looking at getting a bigger zoom lens, I don't know what most photographers use when shooting motor sport so if you could please give me some feedback that would be great. With also what lens is good for the job.

    Also looking into getting a fisheye lens, however I have seen that they change in the mm with the lens. Could someone please explain this also.

    Thank you in advance for the help

    Cheers,

    Barnzy

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    Ausphotography Regular axle01's Avatar
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    Depends on how close you will be shooting, you will need a good lens like a 70-200 f2.8 but it is expensive.

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    Amor fati!
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    get a faster lens for ease and speed of focusing. the 70-200/2.8 would be good. a 300/4 would work well too and maybe a 2x TC.

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    Account Closed Wayne's Avatar
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    Unless you have access close to the action, the longer the better for focal length. For motorsports, I would recommend fast 300mm f/2.8 and a couple of TC's, or if the budget allows, 400 f/2.8 with same TC's.

    A cheaper alternative for Canon users is the 100-400 which I know a couple of friends use for bike and car racing, and it works well in decent light.

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    barnzy's Avatar
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    Thanks for the instant feedback guys... Just wondering if the following would be any good.

    Nikon AF Zoom-Nikkor 70-300mm f/4-5.6 G 70-300 mm

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    Ausphotography Regular axle01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by barnzy View Post
    Thanks for the instant feedback guys... Just wondering if the following would be any good.

    Nikon AF Zoom-Nikkor 70-300mm f/4-5.6 G 70-300 mm


    I've got one but for me it's to slow i always use the 70-200 if i can get close enough.

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    i think any lens up to 200mm for motorsport really, im not even sure fast focus is important, and you are not going to be shooting at f/8 or below much either as you will be panning most of the time at low shutter speeds a high appetures

    so, whats wrong with your lens ? could just be technique - how about posting examples
    Darren
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    Constructive Critique of my images always appreciated

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    it's hell of a lot cheaper to weasel your way into a good spot than to get a fast long lens.
    try to apply for media accreditation before the event. you will get better images.
    with good track access, i have found the 70-200 can be too long and i end up using wider lenses.

    i found that motorsport takes technique and practice more than decent equipment. good gear will help and be more consistent, but nailing a nice slow pan is a wonderful feeling.
    Thanks,
    Nam

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    Member neil70's Avatar
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    I suppose it depends on the type of shot you are after. I prefer a nice crisp shot with good spray (from a dirt perspective). So a fast long lens is good. But not for panning at low speeds.
    I use a 100-400L and a 28-135.

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    Quote Originally Posted by N*A*M View Post
    it's hell of a lot cheaper to weasel your way into a good spot than to get a fast long lens.
    try to apply for media accreditation before the event. you will get better images.
    with good track access, i have found the 70-200 can be too long and i end up using wider lenses.
    Are you serious? I don't know if you understand (I'm sure you do), but Motor sports is inherently dangerous. Having inexperienced people on the fast side of the fence is just an accident waiting to happen (With no offense to the OP, as I don't know his level of general motorsports experience).

    i found that motorsport takes technique and practice more than decent equipment. good gear will help and be more consistent, but nailing a nice slow pan is a wonderful feeling.
    At least you got something right

    To the OP, get out there with your 70-300 and shoot, shoot, shoot. If you are doing circuit racing, you are in reality only a few metres away from the pros on the spectators side of the fence. If you really want to have some nice clear shots, consider going to events that are of a lower level (state and club championship events are perfect) and practice a lot.
    Last edited by hoffy; 22-09-2010 at 8:36pm.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hoffy View Post
    Are you serious? I don't know if you understand (I'm sure you do), but Motor sports is inherently dangerous. Having inexperienced people on the fast side of the fence is just an accident waiting to happen (With no offense to the OP, as I don't know his level of general motorsports experience).


    At least you got something right

    To the OP, get out there with your 70-300 and shoot, shoot, shoot. If you are doing circuit racing, you are in reality only a few metres away from the pros on the spectators side of the fence. If you really want to have some nice clear shots, consider going to events that are of a lower level (state and club championship events are perfect) and practice a lot.
    Wow an over-reaction perhaps.

    Media accreditation will give you much better access, in most cases, than as a spectator. Along with accreditation will come a set of guidelines specifying where you can and can't stand an when (or not) you could cross the track. If the club running the event is accredited you will sign a standard indemnity so that if the worst did happen you can't go back on the club. However to get accredited the club may well ask what is in it for them, or at least what experience you have.

    In my experience the flaggies / officials around the track will help you (including letting you in no uncertain terms if you have transgressed). This the best environment to learning to shoot a motor sport event. In other words don't piss off the officials, go and do everything you are asked.

    Use the "resident" pro's to get advice on where to stand, both for safety but also to get the best pic.

    Photographic motorsport is more than just turning up with your kit (even if it is $40k worth of Nikon), and it is more than just taking good photos. Your behaviour on the track, your response to advice / being told when you are in the wrong place, will determine if you are given accreditation a second time.

    Good luck have fun and practice, practice, practice. At this stage the quality of images will more likely be limited by skill rather than equipment.

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    maybe we shouldnt refer to it as media accreditation, maybe "photographer access", maybe they could sell those tickets at a higher price as you get much better seats ?

    Seriously, media accereditation, if that's what it is, is for media.

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    Would you recommend the 70-200 over the 200mm?

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    The 200 f/2 is a stunning lens, I'd have one in a heart beat.......but if I could choose only one I'd still go with the 70-200, it's a lot lighter and more versatile

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