User Tag List

Thanks useful information Thanks useful information:  0
Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Shooting in clouds/mist

  1. #1
    Member woofie's Avatar
    Join Date
    11 Jul 2010
    Location
    Townsville
    Posts
    81
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Shooting in clouds/mist

    Just wondering if someone can help me out.

    Went for a drive today to a nice little spot up in the mountains, and well it's nothing unusual for there to be low clouds thus giving a mist/fog look & feel. I was wondering though what would be the best settings for me to try and shoot this? Today I found I was using a high ISO (1600/800) due to be semi dark 1/80s and F/8 to F/11.

    I know I couldn't use a flash as it's just to bright with the reflection from the cloud/mist. I was happy with the lighting when using 1/80s & F8 but the photo looks grainy.

    What is a good way to make it look more sharp when shooting in these conditions?

    Thanks for any hints/tips in advanced.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    09 Feb 2009
    Location
    Newcastle, NSW
    Posts
    8,372
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    as far as I can tell, probably the only way is to use a tripod, thereby allowing you to use lower iso`s.
    Graeme
    "May the good Lord look down and smile upon your face"......Norman Gunston___________________________________________________
    Nikon: D7000, D80, 12-24 f4, 17-55 f2.8, 18-135, 70-300VR, 35f2, SB 400, SB 600, TC-201 2x converter. Tamron: 90 macro 2.8 Kenko ext. tubes. Photoshop CS2.


  3. #3
    Who me?
    Join Date
    02 Sep 2007
    Location
    Tweed Heads
    Posts
    2,749
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    always difficult shooting in mist/fog, longer exposures mean a tripod as OD mentioned, best advice is to post one or two shots that you took and get specific feedback.
    Cheers David.

    Canon 40D/EF-S 17-85 mm IS/Kenko Extenson Tubes/Canon EF 50mm F/1.8 II (nifty fifty)
    Sigma 10-20mm 4-5.6 /Sigma 70-200/ Sigma 1.4 teleconverter/ some Conkin filters | Adobe Photoshop CS6



  4. #4
    Member
    Threadstarter
    woofie's Avatar
    Join Date
    11 Jul 2010
    Location
    Townsville
    Posts
    81
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Here is two of the shots it that helps. Any help to make them sharper/clearer next time I go up would be great.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #5
    Ausphotography Regular wideangle's Avatar
    Join Date
    28 Sep 2007
    Location
    Hobart
    Posts
    1,460
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Invest in a good sturdy tripod, as that will then take your mind off having to use a high ISO that will introduce noise into your shots as well as negate the issue of camera shake due to slow speeds. Shooting in misty and cloudy conditions can be difficult because of the reflective light that can play havoc with the light metering. Using digital is of benefit here as you can check the histogram to make sure that your are pushing it as far to the right as possible without losing highlight details.
    please ask before PP my images

    "Life is what happens to you while your busy making other plans"

  6. #6
    Member Mikepaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    22 Jun 2010
    Location
    Upper Kedron
    Posts
    14
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Smile Use a Tripod for detail

    In these conditions it is almost a must to use a tripod and set your iso to 200. If possible a remote or use your timer to fire your camera. Another thing I use in these situations is to braket your shots changing the aperture then use one software High Dynamic Range (HDR) software. Their are a number of free HDR software sites just type it into google. This site offers free software and a good description of using HDR.
    http://www.techsupportalert.com/best...r-software.htm

    Have fun

    Mike

  7. #7
    Member Freya's Avatar
    Join Date
    15 May 2010
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    14
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I agree, a tripod will help greatly! I must say that your two photos are very atmospheric though!

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    26 Jul 2010
    Location
    South
    Posts
    254
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mikepaus View Post
    In these conditions it is almost a must to use a tripod and set your iso to 200. If possible a remote or use your timer to fire your camera. Another thing I use in these situations is to braket your shots changing the aperture then use one software High Dynamic Range (HDR) software. Their are a number of free HDR software sites just type it into google. This site offers free software and a good description of using HDR.
    http://www.techsupportalert.com/best...r-software.htm

    Have fun

    Mike
    This is actually quite bad advice. You do NOT change the apeture in HDR imaiging, as this changes the depth of field between each bracketed shot, and also image sharpness will vary throughout the apeture range.
    You must only adjust the shutter speed, and the shutter speed only (set camera to A or Av mode, turn off auto ISO if your model has this feature). Focus on something, then lock, the lens to manual focus and do not adjust focus between each bracketed shot.

    To the OP, just get a tripod. That's what will help. If you could get it down to 200ISO from 1600ISO that will knock off 3 stops so you'd have been shooting at 1/10th. I'd then get the image into photoshop and have a play with Levels to get the contrast back into the foreground a bit
    Canon stuff 5Dmk1 w/ 24-70 f2.8L, Canon 5Dmk1 w/70-200f2.8L, 100mm f2.8 macro, 50mm f1.4, 580exII
    Alienbees B800, Lumopro 160, Manfrotto 155XPROB w/ 498RC2, Lowepro ProRunner X450AW
    Phew!

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    12 Sep 2009
    Location
    Gin Gin
    Posts
    56
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    When I'm unsure of the lighting, I use bracketing, but i use the AE in 1 stop high and low just in case.
    On a tripod and use the timer.
    Unfortunately, the D300s doesn't use the wonderful $30 IR remote that the D80 uses.
    Very moody, good-looking shots nevertheless.

    Peace & Happiness
    Geoff

  10. #10
    Ausphotography Regular swifty's Avatar
    Join Date
    18 May 2007
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,440
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    And if u don't have/want to use a tripod, drop your shutter speed to 1/40th (should be adequate for hand holding for the focal lengths in your example), drop the iso to 200, open up the aperture 1-2 stops. In your examples I don't think dof is a problem so eg. f5.6 should be adequate. At iso 200 there really shouldn't be much noise and select the minimum shutter speed u can hand hold.
    Don't think hdr is necessary since foggy shots usually means lack of contrast rather than too much.
    There's no one good setting for fog. It'll depend on your light conditions. Avoid flash cos u'll just light up the foreground fog and see nothin behind it.
    Nikon FX

  11. #11
    Member franko's Avatar
    Join Date
    25 Aug 2010
    Location
    Noosa but moving to Tassie
    Posts
    14
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Contrast in these situations is relatively low so HDR is completely unnecessary. Do bracket your exposures and capture in RAW and you'll have more than enough latitude to post produce a complete dynamic range in your final image. Also I don't know from your post whether or not you use auto ISO (don't!) or one of the auto exposures (again, don't). Also if you were shooting at 1/80 at f8 you could have used 1/160 at f5.6 for the same exposure and less camera movement.

  12. #12
    http://steveaxford.smugmug.com/ Steve Axford's Avatar
    Join Date
    19 Nov 2007
    Location
    About in the middle between Byron Bay, Ballina and Lismore
    Posts
    3,141
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Mist/fog is one of the best lighting conditions you can get! Use a tripod or rest the camera against a tree to keep it steady and then use the aperture you would normally use. I agree with franko - forget HDR, but do shoot in RAW (with or without clothes )

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •