User Tag List

Thanks useful information Thanks useful information:  0
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: How reliable is flash slave mode?

  1. #1
    Member achee's Avatar
    Join Date
    22 Jul 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    344
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    How reliable is flash slave mode?

    Hi!

    I recently got a Nissin Di622 (my first speedlight) and I've been been using the flash off-camera in slave mode (wireless optical triggering). However it doesn't always work, so I've been trying to figure out how to get it to work more reliably. I haven't done a lot of testing yet.

    What factors affect performance? The sensor is the big red transparent panel on the front, right? I guess that points at the subject... Should I expect it to perform reliably as long as the distances between the speedlight and the camera flash and the subject are all within, say, 10m, and we're not in direct sunlight?

    I saw this product:
    http://cgi.ebay.com.au/Fotogen-Lite-...item1c12db0321
    What does this do that the speedlight doesn't already do? Is it more sensitive?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Ausphotography Site Sponsor/Advertiser OzzieTraveller's Avatar
    Join Date
    12 Oct 2009
    Location
    Forster- Tuncurry, eastern Australia
    Posts
    1,600
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    G'day achee

    The device you link to is similar to those I use as well


    Link to google site = "http://www.thefind.com/search?query=optical+slave+flash+trigger#page=2"

    I have a handful of these devices for the various flash guns I use in workshops
    Some always operate perfectly, others are a bit temperamental

    These devices ONLY work with a flash gun that fires a single-flash ... ie not a TTL flash that gives 2 flashes ... the 1st metering flash & the 2nd main exposure flash
    I use them attached to old film-camera flash guns picked up for $25 from sunday markets, and then they are used as slave units for various workshop exercises - where they are triggered by a dSLR flash on 'single-flash-manual' settings

    For P&S cameras AND dSLR cameras using pTTL (ie: the double-flash mentioned above) you will need a "digital optical slave trigger". These are hard to find and are about $A100 each ... waste of money compared with a certified digital slave flash gun

    There are many of these around, Yongno (spelling?), mecablitz, sunpak, etc that sell from $A60 which have enough flash power for 'average' situations ... if you want a guide number >100/ISO-100, you will have to pay much more

    Hope this helps a bit - come back with more Qs as they arise
    Regards, Phil
    Of all the stuff in a busy photographers kitbag, the ability to see photographically is the most important
    google me at Travelling School of Photography
    images.: flickr.com/photos/ozzie_traveller/sets/

  3. #3
    Member
    Threadstarter
    achee's Avatar
    Join Date
    22 Jul 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    344
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Cool, thanks for that. I'll probably look out for another old flash unit as you suggest. When shooting with flash I'm usually in M mode anyway, so the on-camera flash would only fire once.

    What functionality do those optical triggers add, since most flash units AFAIK already have optical slave triggering? Do they improve sensitivity / reliability? Have you tried using them at large distances or in bright ambient lighting?

  4. #4
    Administrator ricktas's Avatar
    Join Date
    24 Jun 2007
    Location
    Hobart
    Posts
    15,650
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by achee View Post
    Cool, thanks for that. I'll probably look out for another old flash unit as you suggest. When shooting with flash I'm usually in M mode anyway, so the on-camera flash would only fire once.

    What functionality do those optical triggers add, since most flash units AFAIK already have optical slave triggering? Do they improve sensitivity / reliability? Have you tried using them at large distances or in bright ambient lighting?
    These are often radio triggers, rather than infra-red triggers, meaning you can place your flahs heads more creatively, as infra-red needs 'line of sight' to activate.
    "It is one thing to make a picture of what a person looks like, it is another thing to make a portrait of who they are" - Paul Caponigro

    Constructive Critique of my photographs is always appreciated
    Nikon, etc!

    RICK
    My Photography

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    24 Jun 2009
    Location
    Northern Beaches, Sydney
    Posts
    2,338
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Another limitation for optical vs radio can be that optical don't work so well in bright light.

    I have a set of Cactus V4's (from memory about $60 for a transmitter/receiver set, and then additional receivers at about $30) and I have used them in bright daylight at about 10 metres, but haven't pushed them any further than that.

    One tip using optical systems can be to "bounce" the signal - for example point your optical trigger at the subject rather than toward the camera (as the camera will be pointing toward the subject too) or using bounce flash style bouncing off nearby walls, ceilings etc.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •