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Thread: High Stop Filters Info please,

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    May the Lord Have Mercy !! Roosta's Avatar
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    High Stop Filters Info please,

    Can any OLY people help, I'm intrested in landscape pics, it was recommended to me to try a Stop Filter, See my landscape pics, any way, has anyone had success with any one in particular.??? this was a reply I recieved.

    (There are a number of high stop filters that you can get. Some are screw on some fit into holders. Have a look into filter systems as they are basically invaluable when it comes to landscapes.) from bb45pz..
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    Administrator (Site Owner) ricktas's Avatar
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    Filters are not specific to Olympus!

    There are several brands to choose from : Cokin : B&W : Lee : and more

    For landscape photography the best options are a polariser filter, a set of Neutral Density Graduated filters (know as N.D Grads) and possible a set of Neutral Density filters. You are better going for a slide in filter system than a screw on one. With a screw on system the blending point is always in the middle of the filter, but you may not want the horizon in the middle of your shot, thus screw on filters are limiting. Slide in filter systems are much more versatile as you can slide the square filter up and down in the holder to place the blending where you want it for your shoot.
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    Who me? dbax's Avatar
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    Ok Roosta, here we go.
    "Most" landscape photographers use filters, there are screw on ones and ones that require a filter holder, the latter being the most practical so most common. These filters come in a number of different types, NDx( neutral Density) x being a number, which usually relates to the number of f stops that the filter reduces the amount of light entering the lens eg ND2 = a neutral Density filter that will reduce the light by 2 f stops. this allows you to use longer exposures, useful for catching that smooth water movement effect.
    Then we have GNDx( Graduated Neutral Density)x as above. These filters have a dark portion that you can use to cut the amount of light in a specific area of the scene, typically used with sunrises. These come in GND hard and soft(amongst others) soft being a very gradual lightening of the filter, hard being a definite stop across the filter.
    they also come in various colours.
    Have a look at some of the suppliers sites listed below and you'll get the idea

    http://www.cokin.fr/

    http://www.leefilters.com/camera/pro...46C9C1B6AA3DD/

    http://www.singh-ray.com/grndgrads.html

    not the complete answer on filters but it will get you started.
    Have fun
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ricktas View Post
    Filters are not specific to Olympus!

    There are several brands to choose from : Cokin : B&W : Lee : and more

    For landscape photography the best options are a polariser filter, a set of Neutral Density Graduated filters (know as N.D Grads) and possible a set of Neutral Density filters. You are better going for a slide in filter system than a screw on one. With a screw on system the blending point is always in the middle of the filter, but you may not want the horizon in the middle of your shot, thus screw on filters are limiting. Slide in filter systems are much more versatile as you can slide the square filter up and down in the holder to place the blending where you want it for your shoot.
    Thanks mate, sort of thought the ND was the way, like the idea of the slide in filter system, will check it out.

    Thanks again

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbax View Post
    Ok Roosta, here we go.
    "Most" landscape photographers use filters, there are screw on ones and ones that require a filter holder, the latter being the most practical so most common. These filters come in a number of different types, NDx( neutral Density) x being a number, which usually relates to the number of f stops that the filter reduces the amount of light entering the lens eg ND2 = a neutral Density filter that will reduce the light by 2 f stops. this allows you to use longer exposures, useful for catching that smooth water movement effect.
    Then we have GNDx( Graduated Neutral Density)x as above. These filters have a dark portion that you can use to cut the amount of light in a specific area of the scene, typically used with sunrises. These come in GND hard and soft(amongst others) soft being a very gradual lightening of the filter, hard being a definite stop across the filter.
    they also come in various colours.
    Have a look at some of the suppliers sites listed below and you'll get the idea

    http://www.cokin.fr/

    http://www.leefilters.com/camera/pro...46C9C1B6AA3DD/

    http://www.singh-ray.com/grndgrads.html

    not the complete answer on filters but it will get you started.
    Have fun
    Thanks for that, had a read on the Hoya and Cokin sites last night, The ND range seems the go, I was chasing that soft water look,. so thanks for the info, just what type to get, I think like you say, the filter holder (Cokin) type might be the pick. Ricktas also mentioned B&W, I will take a google at them aswell. Thanks again.

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    i have been investigating the ND filter too from what i have researched and had the chance to read i think the Lee system is the go.. just so expensive... like all good photo stuff.. (>.<)

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    Administrator (Site Owner) ricktas's Avatar
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    one thing with the slide in filters that go into holders, they can let light in around the filter as they do not fit right up against the lens in some instances. The screw on ones do not let light in around the edges. So there are benefits and disadvantages of using both systems, it is a matter of learning your gear and working within its limitations.

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