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Thread: 100mm or 60mm macro for 7D

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    Focus Pocus
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    100mm or 60mm macro for 7D

    I will be buying a canon 7D and I definitely want a macro lens for the flowers, fungi and insects I like photographing.
    My Canon choices (I know there are other ones out there) are between the EF 100mm and the EF-S 60mm. With the 7D these are equivalent to 160mm and 96mm full frame.

    I'm leaning towards the 60mm because of the crop factor but I'd like to hear from anyone who has considered this question also.

    Thanks
    Mike

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    Hmmm....not sure but even with the crop factor a bit longer focal length doesn't hurt with insect. I have the Nikon 105 and have used it on the D300 quite successfully.
    Cheers, Lani.
    Bodies: Nikon D700, D300 Primes: Nikon 50mm 1.4, 85mm 1.4G, 105mm VR 2.8, 300mm f4. Zooms: Nikon 14-24 2.8, 24-70 2.8, 70-200VR II 2.8, Sigma 10-20mm Processing: Photoshop CS5 extended, LR 3.2.


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    http://steveaxford.smugmug.com/ Steve Axford's Avatar
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    I use the 180mm macro with a full frame and it is great. The 100mm should be a bit wider for you so it should also be great. I'd go for the 100mm.

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    Member rick75's Avatar
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    I went for a 60mm over a longer macro lens as it can double up as a portrait lens, my Tamron 60mm f2 is a great lens in low light, for insects it could be longer but as an all round lens its great.

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    Ausphotography Regular Tricky's Avatar
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    Both are very good lenses, very sharp, pretty much faultless from a technical aspect (as are most macro lenses).

    The 100mm gives you more distance between you and the insect/flower. However, it is bigger, heavier and doesn't double up quite as well as a portrait lens (160mm equivalent). Though still feasible as a portrait lens, its just more difficult indoors given the extra distance you need.

    The 60mm is small, light and makes an excellent portrait lens (96mm equivalent). However, you need to be closer to the insect when shooting macro. How much closer? Well, the "minimum focusing distance" (at which you get 1:1 magnification) of the 100mm is 30cm whilst for the 60mm its 20cm. However, as the 100mm lens is physically LONGER than the 60mm lens, the minimum working distance (ie distance between the end of your lens and the subject) of the 100mm lens is 15cm whilst for the 60mm its 9cm. Do you need the extra 6cm? Personally, I've never really had much of an issue getting close to insects - you soon figure out how to do so without casting a shadow and disturbing them.

    Either way, you really can't go wrong - both are excellent lenses.
    Richard
    Canon 5D4 | 11-24 f/4 L | 24-105 f/4 L| 100-400 L II | 85 f/1.2 L | 100 f/2.8 L macro | MP-E 65 f/2.8 macro | 1.4x | 580EX2 | MT-24 Twin Lite | Manfrotto | Photoshop CS5


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    Focus Pocus
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    Thanks for the considered replies so far, they have been helpful even if a little balanced between the two options.

    My experience over the last 3 years has been with the Fuji bridge cameras, first the S602 and currently the S9500. Both of them have a macro built into the zoom but you have to get VERY close to the object to get the benefit - both lenses have a minimum focussing distance of 1cm from the lens and I have to get that close to get the good shots.

    So 9cm compared to 15cm, both seem like a huge distance

    One more question please - if I use extension tubes does that mean I have to get the lens closer to the subject?

    Thanks again
    Mike

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    Member rick75's Avatar
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    Here is a nice article on extension tubes
    http://www.shutterfreaks.com/Tips/ExtensionTube.htm

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    Focus Pocus
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    "Here is a nice article on extension tubes"

    Thanks Rick - that explained it and confirmed my thought about needing to get closer.

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    I have the Canon 100mmf2.8L IS macro and it`s a sweet lens,goes well with my 7D,I`d highly reccomend it.





    Kev.
    C+C and Edits Welcome,just tell me what you did.
    Canon 50D,EF-S17-85mm,EF100mm F2.8 Macro,MT-24EX Flash.
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