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View Poll Results: Shutter Button / AE lock button - How do you use it?

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  • AF button controls focus, AE button locks the exposure, The shutter button simply activates the shutter

    7 31.82%
  • Af/ AE lock

    7 31.82%
  • Other settings - please explain

    3 13.64%
  • AF/ AF lock

    2 9.09%
  • AE lock/ AF

    2 9.09%
  • AE/ AF, no AE lock

    1 4.55%
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Thread: Shutter button / AE lock button

  1. #1
    Member Mircula's Avatar
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    Shutter button / AE lock button

    Hello,


    I was wondering how everybody uses their Shutter button and AE lock button.
    I am using canon 20D so you can customize it (not sure with other brands or models).

    Options are:

    0: Af/ AE lock
    1: AE lock/ AF
    2: AF/ AF lock, no AE lock
    3: AE/ AF, no AE lock


    I am using number 1 always. How about you?

    Do you change this depending on what you are shooting and if so why?


    Cheers,

    Mirc
    Constructive criticism is most welcome!!!

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  2. #2
    Moderately Underexposed I @ M's Avatar
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    The AF button controls the focus.

    The AE lock button locks the exposure when I need to meter and recompose.

    The shutter button simply activates the shutter.

    Three buttons with separate functions just as they should be.
    Andrew
    Nikon, Fuji, Nikkor, Sigma, Tamron, Tokina and too many other bits and pieces to list.



  3. #3
    In Training MarkChap's Avatar
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    I swapped the function of the AE lock button and the AF on button, my thumb falls better over the AE lock button.

    The shutter button is then used to activate the meter and activate the shutter.
    I shoot almost exclusively in manual mode so no need for an AE or exposure lock button
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by I @ M View Post
    The AF button controls the focus.

    The AE lock button locks the exposure when I need to meter and recompose.

    The shutter button simply activates the shutter.

    Three buttons with separate functions just as they should be.
    Assuming that is what your camera allows! (Another reason to upgrade)

    On my d40x, I set the AE/AF-lock button to be Focus, and then the shutter button becomes AE-lock (half) and shutter(full). This is the closest I can get to I@M's ideal. (Unfortunately, the AE/AF-lock doubles as "lock photo" when you are looking at the shots. If (when!) I chimp, I have to be careful when I go to take another shot. I always end up with about 10 photos "locked" on the card!
    Regards, Rob

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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by farmer_rob View Post
    Assuming that is what your camera allows! (Another reason to upgrade)

    On my d40x, I set the AE/AF-lock button to be Focus, and then the shutter button becomes AE-lock (half) and shutter(full). This is the closest I can get to I@M's ideal. (Unfortunately, the AE/AF-lock doubles as "lock photo" when you are looking at the shots. If (when!) I chimp, I have to be careful when I go to take another shot. I always end up with about 10 photos "locked" on the card!
    Same for me - the D90 only has one the one AE/AF button, so I use the half press of the shutter button as the AE lock.

  6. #6
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    I use #1 most of the time, except for studio, landscapes and interiors where I go full manual.
    "The greatest camera in the world is the one you hold in your hands when shit happens." ©2007 Raoul Isidro

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    Totally depends on the situation.
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    Oops, I voted for the wrong thing.

    I use AF-on for AF and the shutter button for AE lock and shutter.
    Canon 5DmkII + stuff

  9. #9
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    AF for focus, AE for exposure, shutter button for taking the picture.
    James


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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scotty72 View Post
    Totally depends on the situation.

    Could you explain that a bit more? When do you use what? Isn't it hard to switch the buttons all the time and remember what does what in the given situation?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by I @ M View Post
    The AF button controls the focus.

    The AE lock button locks the exposure when I need to meter and recompose.

    The shutter button simply activates the shutter.

    Three buttons with separate functions just as they should be.

    I dont really understand how this has any advantages above the option AE button for focus, half pressed shutter button for AE lock and shutter pressed for shuttering (hehe no idea if this word exists).

    Do I understand right that you mean with AF button the button to the right of the AE lock button?

  12. #12
    Moderately Underexposed I @ M's Avatar
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    Mircula, it is pretty simple really, I just spot meter on that area with the centre af point as the metering point, push the ae lock button once to hold that exposure value and if necessary apply any ev compensation, from there it is simply a matter of using the af on button to acquire focus with a single push on the button to lock focus at the point that I want in focus. Then any re framing or recomposing can be done without the worry of having to hold any buttons down until it comes time to activate the shutter.

    Works for me that way, I am not saying that it is the only correct way of doing things and if you find other methods just as easy or reliable, go for it.

  13. #13
    Ausphotography Regular Boo53's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by I @ M View Post
    The AF button controls the focus.

    The AE lock button locks the exposure when I need to meter and recompose.

    The shutter button simply activates the shutter.

    Three buttons with separate functions just as they should be.
    I use mine as above


    I must admit I'm not sure I can reprogram the buttons on my sony alpha's, but in any event I don't think I would change them

    John R

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by I @ M View Post
    Mircula, it is pretty simple really, I just spot meter on that area with the centre af point as the metering point, push the ae lock button once to hold that exposure value and if necessary apply any ev compensation, from there it is simply a matter of using the af on button to acquire focus with a single push on the button to lock focus at the point that I want in focus. Then any re framing or recomposing can be done without the worry of having to hold any buttons down until it comes time to activate the shutter.

    Works for me that way, I am not saying that it is the only correct way of doing things and if you find other methods just as easy or reliable, go for it.

    Hey yeah, seems like a good technique as well!

    I guess it is just what people are used to and like more.

    The good thing with your technique is that you can dial in ec without pressing any buttons....

    But, i cant even set it like that on my canon 20d....


    Cheers!!!

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    most of the time its shutter for AF lock and AE button for Exposure lock! does the job nicely w/o confusion

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by I @ M View Post
    Mircula, it is pretty simple really, I just spot meter on that area with the centre af point as the metering point, push the ae lock button once to hold that exposure value and if necessary apply any ev compensation, from there it is simply a matter of using the af on button to acquire focus with a single push on the button to lock focus at the point that I want in focus. Then any re framing or recomposing can be done without the worry of having to hold any buttons down until it comes time to activate the shutter.

    Works for me that way, I am not saying that it is the only correct way of doing things and if you find other methods just as easy or reliable, go for it.
    Nice thread, might try above but I'm not fond of using the dedicated AF button on my Pentax K7 as it sits under my thumb and I find it odd for some reason.

    At the moment I AF AND AE with 1/2 button press of shutter and if I need to to expose some where else I use AE Lock button - AF button doesn't get used, may map it to something else one day.
    Reason for above setup is speed- I do alot of street shooting with a zoom so what I am focusing on is usually a tight crop and what I want to expose for.
    But on days I'm taking time shooting with my prime the quoted technique sounds handy.

  17. #17
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    I only use the shutter button for AF, tried the af-on button, never really liked it, I do know plenty of sport shooters that do it that way tho

    whatever works for you I say
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  18. #18
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    I'd just add that if you are going to trial any technique, give it a week or two as any change to this fundamental style will take some getting used to.

  19. #19
    Ausphotography Site Sponsor/Advertiser DAdeGroot's Avatar
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    I'm an AF-on button AF person with absolutely no AF on the shutter button. I prefer the separation of function as I'm still a predominantly centre-focus-point person (so focus and recompose, just like the old film days).
    Coupled with that, birding and wildlife benefits a lot from having the AF not on the shutter release as you don't want the camera to suddenly refocus on a branch when you press the shutter.
    Dave

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    Like Dave I've disabled AF on my shutter button (we have the same camera).

    I'm still getting used to it, as I'd spent the last five years shooting with shutter release-triggered AF. It does get annoying when I half-press the shutter to find the thing won't focus. :-)

    IMO and IME, it's good to separate AF from shutter actuation. For some types of shooting it's more or less essential.

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