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Thread: Aspect Ratio - widescreen?

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    Aspect Ratio - widescreen?

    This is probably a dumb question - can you only shoot in one aspect ratio on a Canon 450D? If you can where do you change this, thanks

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    The aspect ratio is determined by the sensor. However, you can always crop the image to whatever ratio you like in Photoshop etc.

    Btw; the only dumb questions are those not asked.

    Scotty


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    Scotty is spot on.

    I did read an article a few months ago about thinking ahead when shooting. ie framing your shot with a future crop in mind so you can get the result you are after. For example if you're shooting for a magazine cover that needs to be as certain aspect ratio.

    So it is important to know your sensor and the aspect ratio it shoots and what your result needs to be. (I'll try and find that article)
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    A simple way to find out the aspect ratio is to divide the width of the image by the height. If the answer is around 4/3 (or 1.3333), then the aspect ratio is 4:3 (standard screen). If the answer is around 16/9 (or 1.7778), then the aspect ratio is 16:9 (wide screen).

    To convert standard-screen to wide-screen, just trim 1/8 off the top and 1/8 off the bottom. (Or select 3/4 of the height of the image and the entire width of the image, and crop it.)

    Conversely, to convert wide-screen to standard screen, trim 2/9 from each edge of the image (or select 6/9 of the width of the image, and the entire height of the image, and crop it.)
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    Most consumer level DSLR do not offer an option to change the aspect ratio, however as you go up the product line they do. Some offer 3:2 or 5:4 as a selectable option in the menu. As members above has stated you can just crop in your post processing software.
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    It's all about the Light!
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    +1 to all the above.

    For wide screen it maybe possible to stitch more than one image together as it done for panoramas.
    Allow for this option.

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