User Tag List

Thanks useful information Thanks useful information:  0
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Western Oz Sunset Shots

  1. #1
    Member Imagenif's Avatar
    Join Date
    10 Jun 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    301
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Western Oz Sunset Shots

    Hi All,

    Im travelling to WA on monday for biz & thought id pack my camera & try my first sunset shots off a beach. I have no idea what I'll need in terms of filters or techniques etc. Any help would be much appreciated. I'll be using my 18-200 EFS IS lens with the 50D. Thanks

    Tony
    Tony

  2. #2
    For the love of what I see.
    Join Date
    28 Dec 2009
    Location
    Yokine
    Posts
    986
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    From a WA member, I don't use filters as I have enough problems with just a camera and lens.
    I think timing is going to be your biggest issue. Of late the sunsets have been few and far between and very quick. In summer it can take 2 hours whilst at present if you have 20 min you're lucky. Depending where you're going to be Scarborough or Cottesloe are both good places.
    Peter.

    Some of my photo's are at www.peterking.id.au

  3. #3
    Administrator ricktas's Avatar
    Join Date
    24 Jun 2007
    Location
    Hobart
    Posts
    15,374
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Filters for sunsets, sunrises. Neutral Density Graduated (NDGrad) filters are your friend. These darken the sky whilst leaving the land unaffected. Quite often the range of brightness in a sunset/sunrise is greater than your camera's sensor can handle, so using an NDGrad can darken the brightest part of the scene (sky) to give you a better overall exposure of your scene.
    "It is one thing to make a picture of what a person looks like, it is another thing to make a portrait of who they are" - Paul Caponigro

    Constructive Critique of my photographs is always appreciated
    Nikon, etc!

    RICK
    My Photography

  4. #4
    Member
    Threadstarter
    Imagenif's Avatar
    Join Date
    10 Jun 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    301
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks Peter & Rick, much appreciated.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    06 Jun 2010
    Location
    Sunnybank, Brisbane
    Posts
    138
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ricktas View Post
    Filters for sunsets, sunrises. Neutral Density Graduated (NDGrad) filters are your friend. These darken the sky whilst leaving the land unaffected. Quite often the range of brightness in a sunset/sunrise is greater than your camera's sensor can handle, so using an NDGrad can darken the brightest part of the scene (sky) to give you a better overall exposure of your scene.
    Yes, I use a GND. The only problem I noticed on a sunrise on the the East Coast last week is that it make all the sky darker. There's an filter called the reverse GND which is darkish just above the middle and then gets lighter toward the top. This means that the setting/rising sun is controlled, but the top of the sky is not overly darkened. Look part-way down this web page to see the gradient profile and an example of the result.

    Dan

  6. #6
    Member
    Threadstarter
    Imagenif's Avatar
    Join Date
    10 Jun 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    301
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks Dan, I like the look of that! Do you know any stockists in Sydney?

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    06 Jun 2010
    Location
    Sunnybank, Brisbane
    Posts
    138
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Tonym06 View Post
    Thanks Dan, I like the look of that! Do you know any stockists in Sydney?
    Tony, sorry, I don't.


    Dan

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •