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Thread: Web resolution

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    Web resolution

    I read somewhere that web resolution should be 96 ppi for the now larger screens.
    So, should I change from 72ppi to 96 ppi?
    Carmen

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    Don't know if you should necessarily or if there is much noticeable difference, but I use 100dpi.

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    I read recently in one of my books to display for web at 90dpi, a few pixels here or there probably won't make to much difference.

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    Administrator ricktas's Avatar
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    Most modern displays are about 90-100ppi. In the past 72ppi was standard, but as screens have improved it has jumped up a bit. Like Lani, I use 100ppi
    "It is one thing to make a picture of what a person looks like, it is another thing to make a portrait of who they are" - Paul Caponigro

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    Thanks everyone. I had forgotten I had asked this question. Thanks for your answers.

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    Perpetually Bewildered fillum's Avatar
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    The ppi setting for an image is irrelevant for screen display. It is the actual pixel dimensions that affect how the image is displayed. For example if your screen is 1280 x 1024 and your image is 1280 pixels wide, the image will fit exactly the width of the screen regardless of what ppi has been set for the image.

    Note that in PS if you have the "Resample" box ticked and change the ppi value PS will change the pixel dimensions of the image which will affect how it displays.

    Ppi/dpi are relevant to printing and scanning.



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    Phil.

    Some Nikon stuff. I shoot Mirrorless and Mirrorlessless.


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    Administrator ricktas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fillum View Post
    The ppi setting for an image is irrelevant for screen display. It is the actual pixel dimensions that affect how the image is displayed. For example if your screen is 1280 x 1024 and your image is 1280 pixels wide, the image will fit exactly the width of the screen regardless of what ppi has been set for the image.

    Note that in PS if you have the "Resample" box ticked and change the ppi value PS will change the pixel dimensions of the image which will affect how it displays.

    Ppi/dpi are relevant to printing and scanning.



    Cheers.
    Sort of. It is not fool-proof. If someone resizes their photo to 5ppi, then increases it to 1024 pixels wide, it is not a good look. So PPI can come into play for image display (even if its a stupid thing to do). Agree with your statement in general, but PPI can be relevant for screen display.

    Try it, resize on PPI to 5, then go back into image size and change the pixels up to 1000. Bad deterioration.

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    Yes, what Phil says is 100% correct. The screen just displays the pixels that are there. The ppi can be 50, 72, 96, 100, 300, 652 or any other number you care to choose and the image will still display exactly the same on the screen.

    It is a totally different story when you go to print the image.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ricktas View Post
    Sort of. It is not fool-proof. If someone resizes their photo to 5ppi, then increases it to 1024 pixels wide, it is not a good look. So PPI can come into play for image display (even if its a stupid thing to do). Agree with your statement in general, but PPI can be relevant for screen display.

    Try it, resize on PPI to 5, then go back into image size and change the pixels up to 1000. Bad deterioration.
    But it is fool-proof as long as you DON'T change the number of pixels in the image. Of course you can get degradation if you fiddle with the number of pixels but that is not what we are talking about here.

    If the number of pixels is constant than changing the PPI only changes the size of the printed image NOT how it is displayed on the screen. The screen only knows about pixels, it does not know about nor does it care about PPI/DPI. If the image is 1000 pixels wide, it will display 1000 pixels regardless of the PPI.

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