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Thread: VC causing vibration

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    VC causing vibration

    I was down on Newcastle harbour on saturday night taking pictures of the city scape when i noticed on full zoom the image was blurred, i use a D90 with 18-270 and slik 300 tripod, after making sure my kids weren't bumping the tripod i thought to turn off the lens' VC and i got a stable image. Why was the VC causing vibrations instead of reducing it?

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    A royal pain in the bum! arthurking83's Avatar
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    You shouldn't be using any image stabilisation on the lens whilst using a tripod(now you realise why ).
    There are a few lenses with a dedicated tripod/monopd image stabilisation mode, but from memory most of them are the heavy, longer professional type lenses.
    Nikon D800E, D300, D70s
    {Nikon} -> 50/1.2 : 500/8(CPU'd) : 105/2.8VR Micro : 180/2.8ais : 105mm f/1.8ais : 24mm/2ais
    {Sigma}; ->10-20/4-5.6 : 50/1.4 : 12-24/4.5-5.6II : 150-600mm|S
    {Tamron}; -> 17-50/2.8 : 28-75/2.8 : 70-200/2.8 : 300/2.8 SP MF : 24-70/2.8VC


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    can't remember Tannin's Avatar
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    Arthur is on the right track, but perhaps a little behind the current state of play. In the Canon world (and I imagine in Nikonland as well) pretty much every lens with IS is capable of detecting a tripod and adjusting as appropriate. The only exceptions are the handful of early-model IS lenses that are still in production, most notably, the 100-400. The big white primes, for example (400/2.8, 500/4, and 600/4) were introduced more than ten years ago now, and all are tripod-friendly.

    Your 18-270, however, will be a third-party lens. Which ones calls IS "VC"? It's not Sigma (they call it "OS" as I recall) and I don't think Tokina have an 18-270, so it must be Tamron. But that doesn't matter: none of the third-party lens makers have been doing IS for very long. I imagine that they are up to around about where Canon were 10-12 years ago with a lens like the 100-400 (non-tripod friendly). But I also imagine that they won't take all that long to change that: a couple more years maybe.

    In the meantime, your practical answer, as you have discovered for yourself, is to switch the IS off when using a tripod.
    Tony

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    So when the Tamron lens can't detect any vibrations, it makes it's own vibration? Isn't technology great...

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    Ausphotography Addict Richard Hall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giac View Post
    Why was the VC causing vibrations instead of reducing it?
    All good info above, however addressing your actual question, it does so as it's trying to compensate for movement that isn't there and simply gets it wrong. Oh, and yes, turn it off on a tripod, naturally.
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    A royal pain in the bum! arthurking83's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giac View Post
    So when the Tamron lens can't detect any vibrations, it makes it's own vibration? Isn't technology great...


    very few tripods/heads can account for the high frequency vibrations caused by mirror slap.
    That's why there's a tripod mode(on Nikon's VR lenses, where fitted) as these vibrations are different to the kind normally associated with hand held photography.
    I suspect that what Giac experienced has more to do with mirror slap, and the inability for this lens to compensate for that.

    Both my 105VR and 18-105VR seem to magnify vibrations when using them on a tripod.

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    Administrator ricktas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giac View Post
    So when the Tamron lens can't detect any vibrations, it makes it's own vibration? Isn't technology great...
    Not just Tamron, most brands do this with VR/IS/OS unless they have a tripod mode
    "It is one thing to make a picture of what a person looks like, it is another thing to make a portrait of who they are" - Paul Caponigro

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    Quote Originally Posted by arthurking83 View Post


    very few tripods/heads can account for the high frequency vibrations caused by mirror slap.
    That's why there's a tripod mode(on Nikon's VR lenses, where fitted) as these vibrations are different to the kind normally associated with hand held photography.
    I suspect that what Giac experienced has more to do with mirror slap, and the inability for this lens to compensate for that.

    Both my 105VR and 18-105VR seem to magnify vibrations when using them on a tripod.
    This is what I was going to suggest. Mirror slap. In your camera there's an option to delay the mirror closing for a second. Can't remember the name of the option off the top of my head though.

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    Member Spoz's Avatar
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    Exposure delay mode, menu item D10 in the custom settings menu.

    I do make a habit of turning on when using a tripod. Some say it is not necessary for exposures longer than a second, but I still like to turn it on because it certainly won't hurt.

    But mirror vibration was not the cause here as has already been said.

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