User Tag List

Thanks useful information Thanks useful information:  0
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: TV vs AV Mode

  1. #1
    Ausphotography Regular
    Join Date
    19 Jan 2007
    Location
    Perth, Straya
    Posts
    1,232
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    TV vs AV Mode

    Darksome wrote: No I haven't tried TV mode ever to be honest, perhaps I should do some experimentation and see how it comes up compared to shooting in AV. Thanks for the tip.

    ************************************

    Until I learned to revisit and appreciate the other modes on my 350D was until recently a full M junky!





    As I have discovered and to my understanding:
    [edited]TV Mode lets you lock in the Shutter Speed and varies the Aperture automatically for you.
    [edited] AV Mode lets you lock in the Aperture and varies the Shutter Speed automatically for you.
    TV is great for most applications for me as I normally know what DOF I need, if I see the SS is too low then I make bigger aperture (lets more light in) or increase the ISO.


    TV lets me shoot in varying light conditions from shade to bright light easily which is what can occur in shooting nature, sport and other applications. I used to find noise a problem as I would often underexpose - not anymore!

    That's my tip for the week, insert $2 in the slot below.


    |
    |
    Last edited by enduro; 17-04-2007 at 8:35pm.
    "Nature photography is about choosing a location, crawling through dirt, being bitten by insects and occasionally taking a great image". - Wayne Eddy.

    Canon 5D MkIII, Canon 7D, 17-40mm f/4L,
    24-105mm f/4L
    + Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L IS +400mm f/5.6L + Canon 1.4xTC + Canon 100 EF f2.8 USM + 430-EX


  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    02 Oct 2006
    Location
    Gold Coast
    Posts
    91
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think your TV and AV's are the wrong way round.

    AV - you set the aperture - camera adjusts shutter speed automatically for correct expsoure.

    TV - you set the shutter speed - camera adjusts aperture automatically for correct exposure.


    I use av the majority of the time.. unless indoors shooting with a flash (bouncing) I use Manual mode. AV outdoors with flash = fill flash as the camera meters for the ambient light.
    C & C always welcome / Matte Mac User / Leica M2 - M8 - 28mm 2.8 Elmarit ASPH / Voigtlander 35mm 2.5 Skopar / Sony NEX-5 - 16mm 2.8 - 18-55 Kit - A mount adaptor - 30mm Macro / Rayqual E-mount to Leica M adaptor

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    15 Sep 2006
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    119
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DanNG View Post
    I think your TV and AV's are the wrong way round.

    AV - you set the aperture - camera adjusts shutter speed automatically for correct expsoure.

    TV - you set the shutter speed - camera adjusts aperture automatically for correct exposure.


    I use av the majority of the time.. unless indoors shooting with a flash (bouncing) I use Manual mode. AV outdoors with flash = fill flash as the camera meters for the ambient light.


    AV mode for me too, almost everything except sports, car/bike racing and anything else that might need some panning/motion blur then I will use TV. TV or M for long exposure too

  4. #4
    Ausphotography Regular
    Threadstarter

    Join Date
    19 Jan 2007
    Location
    Perth, Straya
    Posts
    1,232
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Dammit!!! - it is wrong.

    Typed this up in Word and copied the wrong proof in.

    To reduce the mental strain on everyone else I edited the OP.

    Should have had the coin slot at the top too!

    Thanks for you input.
    Last edited by enduro; 17-04-2007 at 10:51pm.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    03 Jun 2006
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    Posts
    80
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I will be honest I switch between Aperature and shutter priority depending on the situation...
    Nikon D80•MB-D80•Nikkor AF-S 70-300 f/4.5-5.6 IF-ED VR•Nikkor 28-200 f/3.5-5.6G IF-ED•Nikkor 18-55 f/3.5-5.6G AF•Nikkor 55-200 f/4-5.6G AF•Nikkor 50 f1.8•Speedlite SB800
    Nikon FM-3
    Canon AV-1 | Canon Eos Elan
    Olympus C-740



  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    10 Aug 2006
    Location
    Rockhampton
    Posts
    388
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm generally set on an aperture of around 7 - I shrink it down for landscape and jump to 2.8 if I really need the low light or the dof.

    Only go to TV for bulb and panning.

  7. #7
    Ausphotography Regular
    Threadstarter

    Join Date
    19 Jan 2007
    Location
    Perth, Straya
    Posts
    1,232
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Bax View Post
    I'm generally set on an aperture of around 7 - I shrink it down for landscape and jump to 2.8 if I really need the low light or the dof.

    Only go to TV for bulb and panning.
    I've always been puzzelled about landscape. Should I have a wide aperture or a narrow one - considering I want to take a shot of a mountain range in good light.

    When I read the EXIF of a very good image I see a aperture of about 9 and varying shutter speeds.

    What's your learned experiences?

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    10 Aug 2006
    Location
    Rockhampton
    Posts
    388
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    In all honesty I'm not quite sure, maybe they've taken the sharp point of their lens?

    My logic is that the the smaller the aperture (bigger number) then the more depth of field there is. And being a landscape I generally want to show off all of it?

    But that could be negative on me if you can get enough dof at 9 and the lens starts losing itst sharpness with the smaller apertures? I'm not too sure

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    15 Sep 2006
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    119
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by enduro View Post
    I've always been puzzelled about landscape. Should I have a wide aperture or a narrow one - considering I want to take a shot of a mountain range in good light.

    When I read the EXIF of a very good image I see a aperture of about 9 and varying shutter speeds.

    What's your learned experiences?
    For landscape I would probably go with the lenses sweet spot - f-8 to F-11/12 is common.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •