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Thread: Grid for guide-photoshop

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    Grid for guide-photoshop

    For the last few weeks Ive been using the grid for composition and as a rule of thirds guide in Photoshop. Its very helpful as a reference and it constraints when you crop your image maintaining the 3rds division.

    To set it up:

    Go to: Edit/preferences/Guides, grid & slices...In the grid section, change the gridline to every "100" and change the next box to "percent". Make the subdivision 3. Change the colour to whatever you like.

    To display the grid, got to: View/Show/Grid. Alternatively use the keyboard shortcut " Ctrl+' " to toggle grid display.

    Here's a screen shot of the settings and a shot of an image with the grid:





    Example of how the grid looks:





    It might take you a short while to get the hang of utilising the Grid, but once you are familiar - its very handy. I find it extremely helpful when working with landscape images. Horizon placement and straightening.

    I would also recommend doing some research on the rule of thirds and composition to further compliment this tip.


    Give it a try and let me know how you go.

    -Michael

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    A very good hint.

    I set up a custom shape that allows me to draw the same grid over an image, alter the size of the grid to suit the image and then crop the photo. It uses the same principles but allows you a bit of flexibility.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ged View Post
    A very good hint.

    I set up a custom shape that allows me to draw the same grid over an image, alter the size of the grid to suit the image and then crop the photo. It uses the same principles but allows you a bit of flexibility.
    I used that technique for a while, but with the grid its much faster. The technique you are using is good for looking at a smaller sections of the image using the 3rd guide.

    Cheers mate!

    Come on guys, give it a go

    -Michael

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    I though maybe more people would have tried this out

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    Sorry Sans I saw it, but failed to comment....thanks for posting this...I will have to give it a go.
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    I checked it out Sans. I don't do all that much landscape/architecture/still life stuff and I think this is really where the rule of thirds should apply. Some cameras actually have the grid onboard.

    Good post.
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    As far as I know the D80 has the grid and I use it often....read that as never being turned off. The only problem is they set it so it is in quarters and not thirds.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thing View Post
    I checked it out Sans. I don't do all that much landscape/architecture/still life stuff and I think this is really where the rule of thirds should apply. Some cameras actually have the grid onboard.

    Good post.
    Nah, you dont have to limit it to those genres, I try it out with everything I shoot and PP. When I first started to use the RO3rds, I could see a big improvement in my compositions (personally of course) when compared to my earlier stuff. I know my eye for compo and scene elements/subjects would have grown naturally after a time-spent using the camera, and thinking more about what I shoot, but I always seemed to miss the spot when it came to composition. Now though, I reckon the RO3rds has addressed that problem and now has become second nature, when contemplating a scene; which is handy.

    I hope I dont sound like a sales guy here lol. Sorry about the rant mate


    Yeah about the display on-camera, I dont think the 400D has it - or I havent found it in the deep, deeper still! menu system. Its a shame because I could really do with it now. My Pentax P&S has it though.

    Cheers!


    Ron, cheers mate, no need to say sorry, I thought more people would be interested thats all

    Let me know how it goes anyways

    -Michael
    Last edited by sans2012; 01-04-2007 at 2:56am.

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