User Tag List

Thanks useful information Thanks useful information:  0
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Sigma/Tamron/Tokina lenses for Olympus camera?

  1. #1
    Member enigma82's Avatar
    Join Date
    17 May 2009
    Location
    Newcastle
    Posts
    47
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Sigma/Tamron/Tokina lenses for Olympus camera?

    I've been doing more research trying to find a suitable first digital SLR for myself, and I stumbled across the Olympus E-520 which seems good to me - however, on the online camera store I'm looking at I can't seem to find any Sigma, Tamron or Tokina lenses that specify that they have an Olympus mount.

    Do Olympus cameras only take Olympus lenses? If this is the case would I be better off spending a little extra and getting a Canon EOS 1000D, and waiting a little while to get my 2nd lens for it?

    Another question: do you have to buy flashes specific to your brand of camera? If I bought an Olympus E-520, would I have to buy an Olympus flash?

    I'm trying to piece together as much info as I can so I can make an informed choice that isn't going to cost me more in the longrun. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Member redders64's Avatar
    Join Date
    27 Jun 2008
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    60
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have a Olympus E510 and while I loved it, it was really hard to find the cheaper third party lenses for it, I believe a lot of the makers are starting to address this problem. I decided when I upgraded to get a Canon and do not regret it at all. I will probably get shot down now by all the Olympus users but this is just my opinion. Also it is easier to find third party generic accessories for Canons and Nikons also.
    Phil
    Canon EOS 40D
    EFS 17-85 IS USM Lens
    Olympus E510
    Manfrotto Tripod
    Cokin Filters

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    10 Jan 2009
    Location
    Perth, WA
    Posts
    26
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The 4/3rd's system is really a hindrance on the Olympus system, and as you can imagine it's easier for Sigma etc to make a bunch of "normal" lenses with the different mounts [Canon, Pentax, Nikon] rather than developing or reverse-engineering a whole new format.

    And yes for the flash, you will need a corresponding match. There are also 3rd party options for flashes [moreso than lenses for the Olympus].

    I'd be hard pressed to recommend an Olympus camera... but I don't pretend to know too much about them, just that a lot of people find the limitation on the 4/3rd's system a hassle to get lenses
    Wedding photographer shooting Canon

  4. #4
    Member redders64's Avatar
    Join Date
    27 Jun 2008
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    60
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Agree with Habro on most points the 4/3 system does limit your options with extra lenses etc. However on the plus side I think the kits lenses that came with my Olympus E510 were awesome.

  5. #5
    Member sketty's Avatar
    Join Date
    25 Apr 2009
    Location
    **Suburb/Town Required**
    Posts
    7
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm pretty new to this game myself so don't know too much about the technical qualities of the Olympus gear compared to Nikon, Canon etc but I got an E-620 with the twin lens kit a couple of weeks ago and am pretty happy with it.

    Sigma are part of the 4/3s consortium and make a few lenses which you can see on here Four Thirds lenses. Don't think Tokina and the others make lenses for the system. Bear in mind you can also use the Leica (Panasonic) lenses.

    I don't know anything about flashes but was planning on getting the FL-36R once the need arises - it's about $350 and can be controlled wirelessly by the body (think the 520 does it anyway).

    For me the advantage of the Olympus cameras was in their relatively small size and in-body stabilisation. The Zuiko Digital lenses get pretty good reviews at dpreview, especially the kit lenses (compared to other kit lenses of course). Got to be aware of the limitations of the system though - no super fast lenses (as yet), x2 crop factor (can be an advantage as well, long telephoto lenses are comparatively small), smaller sensor (bit noisy at higher ISO).

    Really depends on your own situation and plans, weigh up the pros and cons of each system and see which matches you the best.
    Olympus E-620
    ZD 12-60 SWD f/2.8-4.0, ZD 70-300 f/4.0-5.6
    ZD 14-40mm f/3.5-5.6 (kit), ZD 42-150mm f/4-5.6 (kit), ZD 35mm f/3.5 Macro
    Cokin filter holder and ND grads, CPL filters, Velbon 600R Tripod

    My pictures on Flickr
    I'm here to learn so feel free to rework my photos if you think improvements can be made!

  6. #6
    Antipod
    Join Date
    25 Apr 2008
    Location
    Amersfoort, NL
    Posts
    657
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Was exchangability not meant ot be the main driving force behind the 4/3 system? I was thinking Sigma and Panasonic should've fitting lenses since both companies took part in 4/3...

    A quick google brought up this page with 4/3 lenses. Yep, Sigma and Panasonic (Zuiko?) should have a couple. Sigma's own lens chart also shows a couple of 4/3 lenses (column marked "FT").

    When checking my local camera store, there are a couple in the list too, you should be able to find them.
    Ciao, Joost

    All feedback is highly appreciated!

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    09 Apr 2010
    Location
    Arana Hills
    Posts
    121
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    May I re-open this thread? I've only bought my DSLR recently (Olympus E-420) and am happy with the range of lenses available from Olympus (Zuiko). It seems, reading these comments, that there are much more lenses available now than there were this time last year, however I'm still slightly confused;

    If a lens (say, Leica or Sigma) is defined as a 4/3 lens, does it mean it will fit all 4/3 cameras? I understand the optics must work, but Sigma (I believe) produce their own 4/3 body too, do they not? Therefore if I buy a Sigma lens (for example) will its AF still work with my Olympus body, and will the physical mount be the same?

    Also, does anyone have any further information to offer since the 4/3 format has been around a little longer? I read that Olympus and Panasonic (Leica) are the only dedicated 4/3 lenses and that Sigma merely adapt their APS-C lenses...is this correct? If so, does that compromise the Sigma lenses in this format, or is it merely to save money on manufacture for them and they still operate just as well?

    Any help/advice would be greatly appreciated.

    Cheers

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •