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Thread: The moment it all clicked

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    The moment it all clicked

    When was the moment for you when it all just clicked? I think I had one this morning when I was out doing some sunrise photos, I decided to try manual mode and just from my quick look on the computer I think the photos have come out well, the photos look to be well exposed given it is the first time I have used manual mode on the 40D and one of the first times I have manual mode at all.

    I was that in tune with my camera and could guess what values I needed fairly well, I think all the help I have gotten on here and the fact using manual mode means you need to slow down and THINK about what you are taking makes a lot of difference.

    Paul

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    Looking forward to seeing the photos Paul. It can "click" at different times for everyone. I think it really depends how much time you spend understanding what each item (shutter speed, aperture, etc) does, and how they inter-relate.

    Once you gain a grasp of that, it becomes much easier. Enjoy!
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    I personally think with alot of people they could be more advanced with there camera but because we have AUTO AP and SP it makes them a little lazy,where as useing full manual mode it makes you have to work the camera thus making you think more about the pic you want to acheive.
    Use it more paul and you will definatley become a better photographer

    steve.

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    It's all about the Light!
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    I got my first SLR in 1981..it was a fully manual Zenit..I only had one lens..It took about 2 months of utter frustration before I had an image I was happy with, but from that point I loved it. I upgraded to an EOS 650 in '87 and immediately got lazy as the camera could do most of the work. Film/ processing was expensive, digital started moving in and I drifted away until recently. I find that I'm very much a beginner when it comes to digital, but luckily can remember all my lessons learned years ago. I work mainly in Av mode but still flick to M when the occasion warrants it. I'm still waiting for the digital click.... I find there's so much more to think about now.

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    A royal pain in the bum! arthurking83's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pgbphotographytas View Post
    ..... I decided to try manual mode .....
    Personally I hate manual mode!

    it's over rated and doesn't actually offer you any more control over the exposure than either Aperture(my fave) nor Shutter priority mode.

    Why? Because!!

    actually because, if you are relying on the cameras metering system to help you get a good exposure, all you're doing is making more work for yourself.

    Both Aperture and Shutter priority are manual modes(and I'm sure last time I checked, you were relying more on Aperture Priority(Tv on Canon), than on full auto(programmed scene) modes.

    I think the most basic mistake a lot of people have with mistaking using manual mode as a panacea, is in not totally understanding how their cameras metering system works.

    NOW!! if you were shooting manual mode and not relying on the cameras meter, then you are truly in Manual mode nirvana!

    When I use manual mode:
    Sometimes when a scene is such that I can't place a focus/metering spot on a part of the scene that I want exposed(as I'd like). I'll take a quick spot meter reading on that area, switch to manual(or under/over expose, in Aperture Priority mode) to get the exposure in that part of the scene as I want.

    With landscape photography where the light is constantly changing, manual mode may be more of a hindrance(hence why I don't normally use it)!

    Don't take my comments to mean that manual mode is bad in some way!! On the contrary there is nothing wrong with manual mode, other than the fact that it actually makes you work harder(esp. in varying light).

    Paul!.... I think you may actually want to read up on what the 40D's metering system is doing as well. Don't rely on Canons manual to give you a full run down on how to make best use of it either.
    Thom Hogan produces camera guides for specific models of camera bodies, and if he creates one for the 40D, then I suggest you spend the $40 to get it and read it carefully. If he doesn't I'm sure someone else does.

    In a round about way, to verify why I think manual mode is a load of baloney, take two different camera models, using the same lens and settings, you will almost certainly get two (slightly) different exposures, especially if the cameras are from different makes!
    Digital is not film, and your digital sensor is specific to your camera(make/model). Add the variable nature of the light that passes through each different make and model of lens, the way in which the camera body controls the aperture for those lenses, and you have a major manual mode mess to deal with.
    With my D70s and D300 there are subtle differences in exposure in using the same lens and the same manual settings for a fixed set of lighting conditions, where I get a brighter exposure from the D300 than I get with the D70s.

    Anyhow, it's all relative. If it works for you and you get consistently good results, then use it to your advantage.. if it doesn't give you consistently better results, find out more info on how your cameras metering system works.
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    No idea why this is in the "General Help" section ?....the proof will be in the taking and showing of the images Paul. I'd go along with most of what Arthur says, I dont see any more difficulty or advantage in using manual over aperture priority, so long as you know which apetaure is going to suit your needs the rest is as simple as watching your light meter and histogram.

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    I guess my point was that using manual mode slows you down and makes you take more care with things rather as you have to think about the settings you are using instead of the camera doing it for you.

    Paul

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    keen learner of new tricks.
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    good for you Paul. I understand the click thing. I mostly shoot in manual now, second to aperture and rarely in shutter p. I have had my D80 for one year now and getting more comfortable with it as time goes on. I can get a better one now but I`m happy with it. Lenses are what I`m looking at now.....which ones?

    I fully agree with Arthur though....he explained it really well.
    Graeme
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    Nikon: D7000, D80, 12-24 f4, 17-55 f2.8, 18-135, 70-300VR, 35f2, SB 400, SB 600, TC-201 2x converter. Tamron: 90 macro 2.8 Kenko ext. tubes. Photoshop CS2.


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