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View Poll Results: Think!

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  • I need to think more

    100 49.75%
  • I usually think my shots through

    81 40.30%
  • I think I want candy

    12 5.97%
  • I hardly think at all

    8 3.98%
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Thread: Think ! (about your photo)

  1. #1
    It's all about the Light!
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    Think ! (about your photo)

    Due to a discussion elsewhere I've been reminded of IBM's Thomas Watson's famous THINK motto.

    http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/mu...ons/think.html
    "Thought," he says, "has been the father of every advance since time began. 'I didn't think' has cost the world millions of dollars."

    So with digital photography do we just shoot away or do we think first?
    How many times do we mess up a photo because we didn't engage our brain first?

    Do you have a plan when you go out? Please suggest more!

    Before you leave check list
    - Camera
    - Charged batteries
    - Memory card(s)
    - Right lenses
    - Tripod, flash and filters
    - Reflectors
    - Bulb release cable or remote
    - Other gear (eg. chargers, garbags to kneel on or use as rain protection etc.)

    Before you start shooting check list
    - ISO
    - Shooting mode (single, continuous, timer)
    - Other menu settings
    - M, Av, Tv etc
    - Manual or Auto Focus

    Each shot check list
    - Focus
    - Composition (rule of thirds, lines and angles)
    - Light and reflections
    - Flash
    - Exposure (+/- Ev)

    Safety
    - Don't step backwards without looking first
    - Be aware of you surroundings
    - Be careful in the bush (snakes, spiders, bees etc.)
    regards, Kym Gallery Honest & Direct Constructive Critique Appreciated! ©
    Digital & film, Bits of glass covering 10mm to 500mm, and other stuff



  2. #2
    Administrator ricktas's Avatar
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    I also consider what I want to shoot. If its landscapes, I will tend to plan my shoot around time of day. I think about what filters I might/will use, where the sun will be, maybe what the tide is doing if I am going to the waters edge etc.

    I think about how I want the final photo to look, what I want in the scene, and what I don't. I also try and arrive early, so I have time to scout around for the best view, and can take my time setting up etc.
    "It is one thing to make a picture of what a person looks like, it is another thing to make a portrait of who they are" - Paul Caponigro

    Constructive Critique of my photographs is always appreciated
    Nikon, etc!

    RICK
    My Photography

  3. #3
    Member Nic076's Avatar
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    I usually think about my shots - certainly more than when I first started anyway . In saying that a lot of photos I am happy with, I have not had the kids with me so there is something in having the time to think and compose a shot. That is why I value the AP meets so very much.

    Could I do more thinking & planning - absolutely
    Olympus E-510 | Kit lenses Olympus 14mm- 42mm, 40mm- 150mm & newly acquired 50mm f/2
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    Next on the hit list is Sigma 10mm - 20mm

    Any comments and critique welcome.

  4. #4
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    Motorsport photography tends to be spontaneous as you shoot as it happens.
    But a plan is needed to get good spontaneous shots you need to plan for the look you want to achieve and plan the location you need to be in to get the spontaneous shot.
    The only problem with a plan is you must be flexible enough to change it as you go, so is it a plan if it changes as you go yes it is, dos this mean you think about your photo yes but you need to do more than think you need to PLAN.
    Thanks Steve
    Winer of the sheep week 2 + 6
    www.atkimages.com.au "If your pictures aren't good enough, you're not close enough," ROBERT CAPA"
    Tokina 16-28 f2.8 PRO FX,Sigma 500 4.5 Ex DG, Canon 5D Mii, Canon 7D, Canon 2x converter,Canon 70-200 2.8 L,
    Sigma 120-300 2.8 EX, Sigma 24-70 2.8 EX, Canon 1.4x converter, Canon 580 ex 2 speed light
    And two canon kit Lenses.

  5. #5
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    My only plan for sport photography is who the client is that day and what they want
    Darren
    Gear : Nikon Goodness
    Website : http://www.peakactionimages.com
    Please support Precious Hearts
    Constructive Critique of my images always appreciated

  6. #6
    Ausphotography Veteran Jules's Avatar
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    I think about most of my shots, but then I concentrate on landscapes, macro and still life which means I can take my time setting up shots, trying different framing, experimenting with DOF etc. I rarely do any action/sports/wildlife shots where (I imagine) you have to react faster and have less time to think.
    Canon DSLRs & lenses | Fuji X series & lenses | Ricoh GR


  7. #7
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    Not thinking is perfect for us sport togs

  8. #8
    Can't Member CAP's Avatar
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    Depends on the situation, in my case.
    I pretty much have, "before you leave and start shooting" covered but for the last two items I am found wanting on occasions.
    Esspecially noticable when out taking the MTB pics. (MTB = mountain bike)
    There are times when once going to the trouble of initial settings I keep shooting away for some ordinary "at best" results, not realising the changing light conditions etc.
    Having said that I am getting more aware in recent times and yield has improved.
    If time is available I will review each pic as it's reeled off, but this is not often possible when there is a lot of riders on the hill.
    As far as the safety aspect goes, I am forever going **** over, tripping over branches, rocks etc when out in the bush / up on the track. There was a time I kicked a frilled neck lizard in the head while rushing to get a better position to shoot from. He/she wasn't happy and needless to say scared the crap out of me.
    Come to think of it, "it wouldn't be sport's photography if it wasn't sport would it?"
    Once I tote a tripod along for macro, landscape etc photos, an automatic -
    "take some time to think about what I'm doing function" kicks in and I the decision making process is somewhat more structured.
    CC always welcome and appreciated.
    Tweaks welcome but please add how and why.



  9. #9
    It's all about the Light!
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    Quote Originally Posted by atky View Post
    Motorsport photography tends to be spontaneous as you shoot as it happens.
    But a plan is needed to get good spontaneous shots you need to plan for the look you want to achieve and plan the location you need to be in to get the spontaneous shot.
    The only problem with a plan is you must be flexible enough to change it as you go, so is it a plan if it changes as you go yes it is, does this mean you think about your photo yes but you need to do more than think you need to PLAN.
    Good point.
    But you do have your camera setup ready to go, eg. ISO, Shooting mode, Av or Tv, Right lens, Manual or AF, etc. That does not mean your not flexible.

  10. #10
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    I dont, I'd like to assess the environment at the time rather than prejudge - that's just a recipe for complacency

    I do make sure I have all the equipment I need, but, I always do all the settings in situ.

  11. #11
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    I usually go out to shoot a particular thing so have lenses etc ready, BUT things can change in an instant and you have to be ready for that too...I still make a lot of boo boos and am never satisfied!
    Margaret

    Nikon D7100 Manfrotto MF 055XPROB Pro Tripod & gynbal head, Nikon 18-70 mm, Sigma 10-20 mm, Kenko tubes, Nikkor 80-300 mm VR, Sigma 180 mm macro, Sigma 120-400 mm OS lenses, SB600 Speedlight, Photoshop CS5 on a Mac, Caapture One 7, Lightroom 4 Critiques welcomed


  12. #12
    Ausphotography Regular Nanny's Avatar
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    I need to think more I must admit I use auto settings alot.
    Canon 1000D twin lens kit. Lenses( EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 ll, EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 lll Tamron SP AF 90mm F/2.8 Di Macro1:1 with hood, Hoya 55mm UV Filter. Picasa 3
    Debbie: (Photo's help us Remember those we have lost.)

  13. #13
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    I shoot more people, animals etc....so a fair bit of planning goes into what I want to capture from them, such as the personality and behaviours and how I am going to relate to them to try and bring it out, have the right gear to get it.
    Animals...treats, water available, calm environment, have them be bathed and exercised before hand. etc.
    People... sort of the same.

    Then, you do a wedding and all the planning under the sun doesn't stop you having to adapt quickly to circumstances changing fast.


    Having said that, sometimes it's just fun to go out and shoot spontaneously and see what happens.
    Cheers, Lani.
    Bodies: Nikon D700, D300 Primes: Nikon 50mm 1.4, 85mm 1.4G, 105mm VR 2.8, 300mm f4. Zooms: Nikon 14-24 2.8, 24-70 2.8, 70-200VR II 2.8, Sigma 10-20mm Processing: Photoshop CS5 extended, LR 3.2.


  14. #14
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    I do try to think about shots - especially ISO and depth - sometimes I realise after I've taken shots I could have done better settings I probably need to think more lol
    Cat (aka Cathy) - Another Canon user - 400D, 18-55,75-300mm Kit Lens,50mm f1.8, Tamron 90mm f2.8 Macro, Sigma 28-70 f2.8-4 DG, Tripod and a willingness to learn
    Software used: PhotoImpact, Irfanview and a lot of plugins
    We don't make a photograph just with a camera, we bring to the act of photography all the books we have read, the movies we have seen, the music we have heard, the people we have loved. - Ansel Adams


  15. #15
    A royal pain in the bum! arthurking83's Avatar
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    I'm with Rick, and usually to an extreme level.

    I think I think too much.
    I know what I want(from a scene) or have thought of a particular way to capture it, and if the light is not as I wanted it to be, I don't bother, even though the light may be OK.

    I think I need to plan, and/or expect just a little less from a place, and just try to get more out of what's there when I get there.

    Other issues I have is which way did I just come from, and which way do I want to go back(I usually vary it just for the sake of variety). I know what's back there and there's definitely a scene to capture at a particular time of day, but I think about the unknown alternatives in coming home a different way.
    Usually I'll regret it, although occasionally it works out too.

    planning is good, and helps to get the best outcome out of a spot, but being overly fussy sometimes is a drawback too.

    That's landscapes.. all other forms of photography I just spray and pray
    Nikon D800E, D300, D70s
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    {Tamron}; -> 17-50/2.8 : 28-75/2.8 : 70-200/2.8 : 300/2.8 SP MF : 24-70/2.8VC


  16. #16
    Ausphotography Regular pgbphotographytas's Avatar
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    I am very guilty of not thinking enough about what I am taking rather just snapping away but the advice above is good and I will be keeping it in mind for the future.

    Paul

  17. #17
    A royal pain in the bum! arthurking83's Avatar
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    Do you use (or find you have any) 'down time' whilst out taking photos?

    I'll define 'down time' as the time between when the light is not really any good for capturing good photos. that could be between breaks in the cloud, rain, say between 11 and 2PM or whatever.

    eg. If you're out trying to capture some crepuscular rays, and the clouds are not playing the game for a little while, say half an hour or so, where it gets completely overcast and dull, but I can see that they'll produce their best once again very soon.. what would do you do?
    Plan another scene, look around your current location for other interesting things to photograph, stand on the roof of your car scouting for other interesting location/subject matter(my car has lots of dents on the roof, and I really need a roof rack ).

    generally I'll scout around for a new location or have a quick break, firing off a few frames via remote control from the comfort of my vehicle rolling a ciggy (whilst the camera is out in the gale force winds).
    Even while it's not conducive to great photography you can still reframe a scene and shoot it as a test to see how it looks as a scene. You don;t necessarily need to keep those images, as they may only be test shots to see if the scene comes out as you expected. Zoom in, zoom out, change direction by a degree or so.. etc

    I try to 'predict' the conditions about to unfold and try to place myself in a reasonable location to make best use of them, or a higher location to get a birdseye perspective or whatever, the point is to try maintaining a dynamic approach even though the time isn't perfect for capturing the image at that moment.

  18. #18
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    I'm guilty of not scouting my frame before I shoot, resulting in me often including elements that ruin the shot, so I definitely need to slow down and think more.

  19. #19
    Site Rules Breach - Permanent Ban
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    I think about almost every technical aspect of the shot then forget to look at whats in the frame which might ruin the shot.

    Oh well - with time comes patience - I just wish it would hurry up

  20. #20
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    Because I take a lot of sports (Basketball ) shots and have probably been inside most of our stadiums in and around Victoria, I tend not to think about taking my shots. What I do have to think about is making sure that I have the correct setting in the camera before the game starts. I also get to games early so I can check the lighting, taking test shots before the game and sometime having to get permission to have access to parts of the courts as to were I want to be positioned.
    With landscapes I like to put a lot more time into them and really think about what I want in my shot, also the time of day, lighting etc etc.
    But I guess I should spend more time thinking about what I'm going to shoot and how.
    Cheers Peter
    Canon 7D...Canon 40D...Canon 24-70L 2.8...Canon 70-200L 2.8...Canon 17-85...Canon 50mm...Speedlights....Tripods...Filters... Battery grips.... And heaps of other stuff


    There are always two people in every picture.. the photographer and the viewer.

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