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Thread: Photographing indoor rock climbing

  1. #1
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    Photographing indoor rock climbing

    Hi All,

    Hope this post is in the right area, this is all new to me. Speaking of new, you may have read my intro and know that I am brand new to the world of DSLR and haven't yet had a chance to get out and use my new gear yet.

    I have done heaps of reading (especially in New To Photography) and other sources and am probably guilty of too much reading and not enough doing!

    Well my eldest daughter who just turned 10 wants to have a few friends for indoor rock climbing this Friday night. I thought I might try my hand finally at taking some pics and was wondering if anyone could provide some basic advice. A bit hard I know if you haven't been to the venue but I was hoping you might have some suggestions re aperture and shutter setting etc.

    Thanks Scott

  2. #2
    Grand Poobah
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    I have climbed indoor and outdoor before with DSLR gear to take photos for fun, and the only thing worth keeping in mind is no flash - simply because it is very distracting to other climbers above, below and around you, and u can frustrates someone's ascent by blinding them or delaying their speed climbing.

    besides that, up the ISO a bit, and open the aperture, rockclimbing indoors are generally very bright for safety purposes - unless u are going to one of those glow in the dark sessions where only the grips and perches are lit up - I have always wanted to try that

  3. #3
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    Hard to advise as I dont know what gear you will be using, ambient lighting conditions etc etc

    But I'd advise using a tripod if you can just to assist in holding the camera steady, and pick short moments when the climber is stationary if possible, with slow shutter speeds in low light it may be difficult without tripod.

  4. #4
    Site Rules Breach - Permanent Ban
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    Best shots are usually taken from the top looking down into the face of the climber

  5. #5
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    This actually ended up being a non-event in terms of photography as I was too busy hands-on. BTW would recommend this as a great 10 year olds party anytime! The problem was that with all the kids (9) , the adults (4) were needed to anchor (is that the right expression?) all the climbers so there wasn't really any time for photos. Was a fun night and we are going back for sure another time so maybe then I will grab some shots. Thanks for the tips though

  6. #6
    Grand Poobah
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    Belaying is the right term for anchoring in rock climbing

    when u get more experienced, try one of my fave tricks, when your partner misses a grip and slips, let him fall a bit longer than usual then suddenly jam down on the rope u are belaying on, the sudden jerk and stop will give him a massive painful wedgy hehehe

  7. #7
    rock climbing is awesome fun. i used to go bouldering a few times a week. this was before i got into photography and i never realised how cool it would be to photograph. so it's time to dust off my shoes and bring the camera along as well.
    Thanks,
    Nam

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