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Thread: 101 Photography Tips

  1. #21
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    1. Take photos early morning or night as there as less shadows
    2. Always make sure your battery is recharged (or you have spare batteries) so your camera doesn't suddenly die on you at the worst possible moment
    3. Get closer - if you can't get closer zoom in further, if you can't zoom in get closer
    4. Learn to use the histogram to adjust settings and get a good exposure.
    5. take the lens cap off doofus!
    6. Check that your camera is not set to auto ISO,(unless you definitely want it to be) learned this the hard way.... as have many others, I expect.
    7. Starting guide for obtaining a proper exposure of a full moon is to the aperture at f/11 and shutter speed at one over the ISO setting (eg. 1/125 for ISO 100). For pictures of a half moon, use the same shutter speed at f/8. For a quarter moon, f/5.6.
    8. Lenses and cameras never used to have anti-shake systems built into them. As shutter speeds got slower, camera shake was likely to blur your image, and you had to know what you could safely get away with! As a rule-of-thumb, the slowest shutter speed at which you could safely handhold a camera was usually considered to be one over the focal length of the lens. So, if you're using a 50mm lens, you could generally shoot at 1/60 sec or faster. A 100mm lens needed at least 1/125 sec; 1/300 for 300mm and so forth. Not enough light to do that? Then you had to use flash, a tripod, or brace your camera (and yourself) against a solid object.
    9. The classic advice is, "Expose for the highlights and let the shadows take care of themselves." This works with slide film and digital. But with negative film, especially colour negative film, you're actually better off overexposing by one stop.
    10. To stop action moving across the frame that's perpendicular to the lens axis, you need shutter speeds two stops faster than action moving toward or away from you. For action moving at a 45-degree angle to the lens axis, you can use a shutter speed one stop slower. For example: If a person running toward you at moderate speed can be stopped at 1/125 sec, you'll need a shutter speed of 1/500 sec to stop the subject moving across the frame, and a shutter speed of 1/250 sec to stop him if moving obliquely with respect to the camera.
    11. Before you ask the question - READ THE MANUAL!!
    12. Learn and understand "depth of field"
    13. When taking your camera out for the first time since a previous shoot verify all your settings are what you want for this new shoot so you don't use the previous shoot settings which may be wildly inappropriate.
    14. dont be afraid of a little fill flash to expose shadowed areas.
    15. Learn and understand the interrelationship between shutter speed, aperture and ISO.
    16. Make sure the camera is on when you go to take a shot
    17. When at a famous landmark, look for the angle you've never seen in another photo before
    18. Get down to children's height to take photo
    19. Know your equipment - to the point where it becomes second nature. The less you have to muck around in menus and think about settings, the more time you can spend on the much more important aspects of timing, lighting and composition. You will always be wanting a new lens, a new body etc - working with what you have will force you to be more creative.
    20. Start shooting raw and learn about white balance
    21. Learn to use exposure compensation (Ev) and handle the highlights better
    22. Keep it simple, in photography less equals more.
    23. Always put your camera on full auto when storing it, travelling etc. You never know when a great shot might present itself, and in Auto you can grab the camera and get the shot off. That elusive shot of a Yeti, will be just a blur if you still had it set to 10 second shutter speed from the night landscapes from yesterday.
    24. For portraits of children always spot focus right between the eyes
    Site: DzR Photography
    Flickr: Flickr

    Camera: Sony A350 DSLR
    Lenses: 18-70mm, 55-200mm, 50mm f1.4, 70-300G, Minolta 35-70mm f4, Tamron 17-50 2.8
    Flash: Sony HVLF42AM
    Tripod: 190xPROB, 488RC4
    Memory: Sandisk Extreme 200x CF
    Software: Adobe Photoshop CS3 + RAW

  2. #22
    Ausphotography Regular wideangle's Avatar
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    25. always have your camera and tripod by your side as you never know when the opportunity moment will arise to get THE shot
    Last edited by Kym; 23-01-2009 at 6:05pm. Reason: Mod edit - keep sequence
    please ask before PP my images

    "Life is what happens to you while your busy making other plans"

  3. #23
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    1. Take photos early morning or night as there as less shadows
    2. Always make sure your battery is recharged (or you have spare batteries) so your camera doesn't suddenly die on you at the worst possible moment
    3. Get closer - if you can't get closer zoom in further, if you can't zoom in get closer
    4. Learn to use the histogram to adjust settings and get a good exposure.
    5. take the lens cap off doofus!
    6. Check that your camera is not set to auto ISO,(unless you definitely want it to be) learned this the hard way.... as have many others, I expect.
    7. Starting guide for obtaining a proper exposure of a full moon is to the aperture at f/11 and shutter speed at one over the ISO setting (eg. 1/125 for ISO 100). For pictures of a half moon, use the same shutter speed at f/8. For a quarter moon, f/5.6.
    8. Lenses and cameras never used to have anti-shake systems built into them. As shutter speeds got slower, camera shake was likely to blur your image, and you had to know what you could safely get away with! As a rule-of-thumb, the slowest shutter speed at which you could safely handhold a camera was usually considered to be one over the focal length of the lens. So, if you're using a 50mm lens, you could generally shoot at 1/60 sec or faster. A 100mm lens needed at least 1/125 sec; 1/300 for 300mm and so forth. Not enough light to do that? Then you had to use flash, a tripod, or brace your camera (and yourself) against a solid object.
    9. The classic advice is, "Expose for the highlights and let the shadows take care of themselves." This works with slide film and digital. But with negative film, especially colour negative film, you're actually better off overexposing by one stop.
    10. To stop action moving across the frame that's perpendicular to the lens axis, you need shutter speeds two stops faster than action moving toward or away from you. For action moving at a 45-degree angle to the lens axis, you can use a shutter speed one stop slower. For example: If a person running toward you at moderate speed can be stopped at 1/125 sec, you'll need a shutter speed of 1/500 sec to stop the subject moving across the frame, and a shutter speed of 1/250 sec to stop him if moving obliquely with respect to the camera.
    11. Before you ask the question - READ THE MANUAL!!
    12. Learn and understand "depth of field"
    13. When taking your camera out for the first time since a previous shoot verify all your settings are what you want for this new shoot so you don't use the previous shoot settings which may be wildly inappropriate.
    14. dont be afraid of a little fill flash to expose shadowed areas.
    15. Learn and understand the interrelationship between shutter speed, aperture and ISO.
    16. Make sure the camera is on when you go to take a shot
    17. When at a famous landmark, look for the angle you've never seen in another photo before
    18. Get down to children's height to take photo
    19. Know your equipment - to the point where it becomes second nature. The less you have to muck around in menus and think about settings, the more time you can spend on the much more important aspects of timing, lighting and composition. You will always be wanting a new lens, a new body etc - working with what you have will force you to be more creative.
    20. Start shooting raw and learn about white balance
    21. Learn to use exposure compensation (Ev) and handle the highlights better
    22. Keep it simple, in photography less equals more.
    23. Always put your camera on full auto when storing it, travelling etc. You never know when a great shot might present itself, and in Auto you can grab the camera and get the shot off. That elusive shot of a Yeti, will be just a blur if you still had it set to 10 second shutter speed from the night landscapes from yesterday.
    24. For portraits of children always spot focus right between the eyes
    25. always have your camera and tripod by your side as you never know when the opportunity moment will arise to get THE shot
    26. When doing portrait shots of man's best friend (the dog) always focus on the eyes... a focused nose and blurry eyes just look silly.
    Osprey Photography

    Canon: 5D Mk II, 40D, 10D all gripped, 10-22 f3.5-4.5, 17-40 f4L, 24-70 f2.8L, 24-105 f4L IS, 70-200 f2.8L IS, 100-400 f4.5-5.6L IS, 50 f1.4, 100 f2.8 Macro and other assorted accessories.

    Some stalk, some chase and some pursue... but I hunt.


  4. #24
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    1. Take photos early morning or night as there as less shadows
    2. Always make sure your battery is recharged (or you have spare batteries) so your camera doesn't suddenly die on you at the worst possible moment
    3. Get closer - if you can't get closer zoom in further, if you can't zoom in get closer
    4. Learn to use the histogram to adjust settings and get a good exposure.
    5. take the lens cap off doofus!
    6. Check that your camera is not set to auto ISO,(unless you definitely want it to be) learned this the hard way.... as have many others, I expect.
    7. Starting guide for obtaining a proper exposure of a full moon is to the aperture at f/11 and shutter speed at one over the ISO setting (eg. 1/125 for ISO 100). For pictures of a half moon, use the same shutter speed at f/8. For a quarter moon, f/5.6.
    8. Lenses and cameras never used to have anti-shake systems built into them. As shutter speeds got slower, camera shake was likely to blur your image, and you had to know what you could safely get away with! As a rule-of-thumb, the slowest shutter speed at which you could safely handhold a camera was usually considered to be one over the focal length of the lens. So, if you're using a 50mm lens, you could generally shoot at 1/60 sec or faster. A 100mm lens needed at least 1/125 sec; 1/300 for 300mm and so forth. Not enough light to do that? Then you had to use flash, a tripod, or brace your camera (and yourself) against a solid object.
    9. The classic advice is, "Expose for the highlights and let the shadows take care of themselves." This works with slide film and digital. But with negative film, especially colour negative film, you're actually better off overexposing by one stop.
    10. To stop action moving across the frame that's perpendicular to the lens axis, you need shutter speeds two stops faster than action moving toward or away from you. For action moving at a 45-degree angle to the lens axis, you can use a shutter speed one stop slower. For example: If a person running toward you at moderate speed can be stopped at 1/125 sec, you'll need a shutter speed of 1/500 sec to stop the subject moving across the frame, and a shutter speed of 1/250 sec to stop him if moving obliquely with respect to the camera.
    11. Before you ask the question - READ THE MANUAL!!
    12. Learn and understand "depth of field"
    13. When taking your camera out for the first time since a previous shoot verify all your settings are what you want for this new shoot so you don't use the previous shoot settings which may be wildly inappropriate.
    14. dont be afraid of a little fill flash to expose shadowed areas.
    15. Learn and understand the interrelationship between shutter speed, aperture and ISO.
    16. Make sure the camera is on when you go to take a shot
    17. When at a famous landmark, look for the angle you've never seen in another photo before
    18. Get down to children's height to take photo
    19. Know your equipment - to the point where it becomes second nature. The less you have to muck around in menus and think about settings, the more time you can spend on the much more important aspects of timing, lighting and composition. You will always be wanting a new lens, a new body etc - working with what you have will force you to be more creative.
    20. Start shooting raw and learn about white balance
    21. Learn to use exposure compensation (Ev) and handle the highlights better
    22. Keep it simple, in photography less equals more.
    23. Always put your camera on full auto when storing it, travelling etc. You never know when a great shot might present itself, and in Auto you can grab the camera and get the shot off. That elusive shot of a Yeti, will be just a blur if you still had it set to 10 second shutter speed from the night landscapes from yesterday.
    24. For portraits of children always spot focus right between the eyes
    25. always have your camera and tripod by your side as you never know when the opportunity moment will arise to get THE shot
    26. When doing portrait shots of man's best friend (the dog) always focus on the eyes... a focused nose and blurry eyes just look silly.
    27. Look at the image in the viewfinder - not through the lens.
    Regards, Rob

    D600, AF-S 35mm f1.8G DX, AF-S 50mm f1.8G, AF-S 24-85mm f3.5-4.5G ED VR, AF-S 70-300mm F4.5-5.6G VR, Sigma 10-20mm F4-5.6 EX DC HSM
    Photos: geeoverbar.smugmug.com Software: CS6, Lightroom 4

  5. #25
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    1. Take photos early morning or night as there as less shadows
    2. Always make sure your battery is recharged (or you have spare batteries) so your camera doesn't suddenly die on you at the worst possible moment
    3. Get closer - if you can't get closer zoom in further, if you can't zoom in get closer
    4. Learn to use the histogram to adjust settings and get a good exposure.
    5. take the lens cap off doofus!
    6. Check that your camera is not set to auto ISO,(unless you definitely want it to be) learned this the hard way.... as have many others, I expect.
    7. Starting guide for obtaining a proper exposure of a full moon is to the aperture at f/11 and shutter speed at one over the ISO setting (eg. 1/125 for ISO 100). For pictures of a half moon, use the same shutter speed at f/8. For a quarter moon, f/5.6.
    8. Lenses and cameras never used to have anti-shake systems built into them. As shutter speeds got slower, camera shake was likely to blur your image, and you had to know what you could safely get away with! As a rule-of-thumb, the slowest shutter speed at which you could safely handhold a camera was usually considered to be one over the focal length of the lens. So, if you're using a 50mm lens, you could generally shoot at 1/60 sec or faster. A 100mm lens needed at least 1/125 sec; 1/300 for 300mm and so forth. Not enough light to do that? Then you had to use flash, a tripod, or brace your camera (and yourself) against a solid object.
    9. The classic advice is, "Expose for the highlights and let the shadows take care of themselves." This works with slide film and digital. But with negative film, especially colour negative film, you're actually better off overexposing by one stop.
    10. To stop action moving across the frame that's perpendicular to the lens axis, you need shutter speeds two stops faster than action moving toward or away from you. For action moving at a 45-degree angle to the lens axis, you can use a shutter speed one stop slower. For example: If a person running toward you at moderate speed can be stopped at 1/125 sec, you'll need a shutter speed of 1/500 sec to stop the subject moving across the frame, and a shutter speed of 1/250 sec to stop him if moving obliquely with respect to the camera.
    11. Before you ask the question - READ THE MANUAL!!
    12. Learn and understand "depth of field"
    13. When taking your camera out for the first time since a previous shoot verify all your settings are what you want for this new shoot so you don't use the previous shoot settings which may be wildly inappropriate.
    14. dont be afraid of a little fill flash to expose shadowed areas.
    15. Learn and understand the interrelationship between shutter speed, aperture and ISO.
    16. Make sure the camera is on when you go to take a shot
    17. When at a famous landmark, look for the angle you've never seen in another photo before
    18. Get down to children's height to take photo
    19. Know your equipment - to the point where it becomes second nature. The less you have to muck around in menus and think about settings, the more time you can spend on the much more important aspects of timing, lighting and composition. You will always be wanting a new lens, a new body etc - working with what you have will force you to be more creative.
    20. Start shooting raw and learn about white balance
    21. Learn to use exposure compensation (Ev) and handle the highlights better
    22. Keep it simple, in photography less equals more.
    23. Always put your camera on full auto when storing it, travelling etc. You never know when a great shot might present itself, and in Auto you can grab the camera and get the shot off. That elusive shot of a Yeti, will be just a blur if you still had it set to 10 second shutter speed from the night landscapes from yesterday.
    24. For portraits of children always spot focus right between the eyes
    25. always have your camera and tripod by your side as you never know when the opportunity moment will arise to get THE shot
    26. When doing portrait shots of man's best friend (the dog) always focus on the eyes... a focused nose and blurry eyes just look silly.
    27. Look at the image in the viewfinder - not through the lens.
    28. DOF - Small number-small DOF. Large number-big DOF.
    __________________
    Carmen

    My Stuff:- Canon 50D l EF 28-80 f2.8-4L
    l EF 100-300 f4-5.6 l Canon 100mm f2.8 macro l Tokina 11-16 f2.8 l Pol. Filter l Flash l Grip l Remote l Tripod l Lightroom 2 l CS3

    Constructive Critique of my photos always appreciated

  6. #26
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    1. Take photos early morning or night as there as less shadows
    2. Always make sure your battery is recharged (or you have spare batteries) so your camera doesn't suddenly die on you at the worst possible moment
    3. Get closer - if you can't get closer zoom in further, if you can't zoom in get closer
    4. Learn to use the histogram to adjust settings and get a good exposure.
    5. take the lens cap off doofus!
    6. Check that your camera is not set to auto ISO,(unless you definitely want it to be) learned this the hard way.... as have many others, I expect.
    7. Starting guide for obtaining a proper exposure of a full moon is to the aperture at f/11 and shutter speed at one over the ISO setting (eg. 1/125 for ISO 100). For pictures of a half moon, use the same shutter speed at f/8. For a quarter moon, f/5.6.
    8. Lenses and cameras never used to have anti-shake systems built into them. As shutter speeds got slower, camera shake was likely to blur your image, and you had to know what you could safely get away with! As a rule-of-thumb, the slowest shutter speed at which you could safely handhold a camera was usually considered to be one over the focal length of the lens. So, if you're using a 50mm lens, you could generally shoot at 1/60 sec or faster. A 100mm lens needed at least 1/125 sec; 1/300 for 300mm and so forth. Not enough light to do that? Then you had to use flash, a tripod, or brace your camera (and yourself) against a solid object.
    9. The classic advice is, "Expose for the highlights and let the shadows take care of themselves." This works with slide film and digital. But with negative film, especially colour negative film, you're actually better off overexposing by one stop.
    10. To stop action moving across the frame that's perpendicular to the lens axis, you need shutter speeds two stops faster than action moving toward or away from you. For action moving at a 45-degree angle to the lens axis, you can use a shutter speed one stop slower. For example: If a person running toward you at moderate speed can be stopped at 1/125 sec, you'll need a shutter speed of 1/500 sec to stop the subject moving across the frame, and a shutter speed of 1/250 sec to stop him if moving obliquely with respect to the camera.
    11. Before you ask the question - READ THE MANUAL!!
    12. Learn and understand "depth of field"
    13. When taking your camera out for the first time since a previous shoot verify all your settings are what you want for this new shoot so you don't use the previous shoot settings which may be wildly inappropriate.
    14. dont be afraid of a little fill flash to expose shadowed areas.
    15. Learn and understand the interrelationship between shutter speed, aperture and ISO.
    16. Make sure the camera is on when you go to take a shot
    17. When at a famous landmark, look for the angle you've never seen in another photo before
    18. Get down to children's height to take photo
    19. Know your equipment - to the point where it becomes second nature. The less you have to muck around in menus and think about settings, the more time you can spend on the much more important aspects of timing, lighting and composition. You will always be wanting a new lens, a new body etc - working with what you have will force you to be more creative.
    20. Start shooting raw and learn about white balance
    21. Learn to use exposure compensation (Ev) and handle the highlights better
    22. Keep it simple, in photography less equals more.
    23. Always put your camera on full auto when storing it, travelling etc. You never know when a great shot might present itself, and in Auto you can grab the camera and get the shot off. That elusive shot of a Yeti, will be just a blur if you still had it set to 10 second shutter speed from the night landscapes from yesterday.
    24. For portraits of children always spot focus right between the eyes
    25. always have your camera and tripod by your side as you never know when the opportunity moment will arise to get THE shot
    26. When doing portrait shots of man's best friend (the dog) always focus on the eyes... a focused nose and blurry eyes just look silly.
    27. Look at the image in the viewfinder - not through the lens.
    28. DOF - Small number-small DOF. Large number-big DOF.
    29. Never pack your camera gear away in a wet or damp condition.
    30. Always double check your bag zippers/fasteners are closed before picking it up.
    31. Always turn off camera before changing lenses.
    32. Try to avoid changing lenses in wet or dusty conditions.
    33. Never hard scrub the glass on your lenses to clean, especially true for the sensor.
    Last edited by Seesee; 24-01-2009 at 6:54pm.

  7. #27
    Member bundabergsangel's Avatar
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    This is a good idea so I thought I might try to revive it!

    1. Take photos early morning or night as there as less shadows
    2. Always make sure your battery is recharged (or you have spare batteries) so your camera doesn't suddenly die on you at the worst possible moment
    3. Get closer - if you can't get closer zoom in further, if you can't zoom in get closer
    4. Learn to use the histogram to adjust settings and get a good exposure.
    5. take the lens cap off doofus!
    6. Check that your camera is not set to auto ISO,(unless you definitely want it to be) learned this the hard way.... as have many others, I expect.
    7. Starting guide for obtaining a proper exposure of a full moon is to the aperture at f/11 and shutter speed at one over the ISO setting (eg. 1/125 for ISO 100). For pictures of a half moon, use the same shutter speed at f/8. For a quarter moon, f/5.6.
    8. Lenses and cameras never used to have anti-shake systems built into them. As shutter speeds got slower, camera shake was likely to blur your image, and you had to know what you could safely get away with! As a rule-of-thumb, the slowest shutter speed at which you could safely handhold a camera was usually considered to be one over the focal length of the lens. So, if you're using a 50mm lens, you could generally shoot at 1/60 sec or faster. A 100mm lens needed at least 1/125 sec; 1/300 for 300mm and so forth. Not enough light to do that? Then you had to use flash, a tripod, or brace your camera (and yourself) against a solid object.
    9. The classic advice is, "Expose for the highlights and let the shadows take care of themselves." This works with slide film and digital. But with negative film, especially colour negative film, you're actually better off overexposing by one stop.
    10. To stop action moving across the frame that's perpendicular to the lens axis, you need shutter speeds two stops faster than action moving toward or away from you. For action moving at a 45-degree angle to the lens axis, you can use a shutter speed one stop slower. For example: If a person running toward you at moderate speed can be stopped at 1/125 sec, you'll need a shutter speed of 1/500 sec to stop the subject moving across the frame, and a shutter speed of 1/250 sec to stop him if moving obliquely with respect to the camera.
    11. Before you ask the question - READ THE MANUAL!!
    12. Learn and understand "depth of field"
    13. When taking your camera out for the first time since a previous shoot verify all your settings are what you want for this new shoot so you don't use the previous shoot settings which may be wildly inappropriate.
    14. dont be afraid of a little fill flash to expose shadowed areas.
    15. Learn and understand the interrelationship between shutter speed, aperture and ISO.
    16. Make sure the camera is on when you go to take a shot
    17. When at a famous landmark, look for the angle you've never seen in another photo before
    18. Get down to children's height to take photo
    19. Know your equipment - to the point where it becomes second nature. The less you have to muck around in menus and think about settings, the more time you can spend on the much more important aspects of timing, lighting and composition. You will always be wanting a new lens, a new body etc - working with what you have will force you to be more creative.
    20. Start shooting raw and learn about white balance
    21. Learn to use exposure compensation (Ev) and handle the highlights better
    22. Keep it simple, in photography less equals more.
    23. Always put your camera on full auto when storing it, travelling etc. You never know when a great shot might present itself, and in Auto you can grab the camera and get the shot off. That elusive shot of a Yeti, will be just a blur if you still had it set to 10 second shutter speed from the night landscapes from yesterday.
    24. For portraits of children always spot focus right between the eyes
    25. always have your camera and tripod by your side as you never know when the opportunity moment will arise to get THE shot
    26. When doing portrait shots of man's best friend (the dog) always focus on the eyes... a focused nose and blurry eyes just look silly.
    27. Look at the image in the viewfinder - not through the lens.
    28. DOF - Small number-small DOF. Large number-big DOF.
    29. Never pack your camera gear away in a wet or damp condition.
    30. Always double check your bag zippers/fasteners are closed before picking it up.
    31. Always turn off camera before changing lenses.
    32. Try to avoid changing lenses in wet or dusty conditions.
    33. Never hard scrub the glass on your lenses to clean, especially true for the sensor.
    34. Be Quiet. Some of the best shots happen when the subject doesn't know you're there (kids, animals, etc).

  8. #28
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    1. Take photos early morning or night as there as less shadows
    2. Always make sure your battery is recharged (or you have spare batteries) so your camera doesn't suddenly die on you at the worst possible moment
    3. Get closer - if you can't get closer zoom in further, if you can't zoom in get closer
    4. Learn to use the histogram to adjust settings and get a good exposure.
    5. take the lens cap off doofus!
    6. Check that your camera is not set to auto ISO,(unless you definitely want it to be) learned this the hard way.... as have many others, I expect.
    7. Starting guide for obtaining a proper exposure of a full moon is to the aperture at f/11 and shutter speed at one over the ISO setting (eg. 1/125 for ISO 100). For pictures of a half moon, use the same shutter speed at f/8. For a quarter moon, f/5.6.
    8. Lenses and cameras never used to have anti-shake systems built into them. As shutter speeds got slower, camera shake was likely to blur your image, and you had to know what you could safely get away with! As a rule-of-thumb, the slowest shutter speed at which you could safely handhold a camera was usually considered to be one over the focal length of the lens. So, if you're using a 50mm lens, you could generally shoot at 1/60 sec or faster. A 100mm lens needed at least 1/125 sec; 1/300 for 300mm and so forth. Not enough light to do that? Then you had to use flash, a tripod, or brace your camera (and yourself) against a solid object.
    9. The classic advice is, "Expose for the highlights and let the shadows take care of themselves." This works with slide film and digital. But with negative film, especially colour negative film, you're actually better off overexposing by one stop.
    10. To stop action moving across the frame that's perpendicular to the lens axis, you need shutter speeds two stops faster than action moving toward or away from you. For action moving at a 45-degree angle to the lens axis, you can use a shutter speed one stop slower. For example: If a person running toward you at moderate speed can be stopped at 1/125 sec, you'll need a shutter speed of 1/500 sec to stop the subject moving across the frame, and a shutter speed of 1/250 sec to stop him if moving obliquely with respect to the camera.
    11. Before you ask the question - READ THE MANUAL!!
    12. Learn and understand "depth of field"
    13. When taking your camera out for the first time since a previous shoot verify all your settings are what you want for this new shoot so you don't use the previous shoot settings which may be wildly inappropriate.
    14. dont be afraid of a little fill flash to expose shadowed areas.
    15. Learn and understand the interrelationship between shutter speed, aperture and ISO.
    16. Make sure the camera is on when you go to take a shot
    17. When at a famous landmark, look for the angle you've never seen in another photo before
    18. Get down to children's height to take photo
    19. Know your equipment - to the point where it becomes second nature. The less you have to muck around in menus and think about settings, the more time you can spend on the much more important aspects of timing, lighting and composition. You will always be wanting a new lens, a new body etc - working with what you have will force you to be more creative.
    20. Start shooting raw and learn about white balance
    21. Learn to use exposure compensation (Ev) and handle the highlights better
    22. Keep it simple, in photography less equals more.
    23. Always put your camera on full auto when storing it, travelling etc. You never know when a great shot might present itself, and in Auto you can grab the camera and get the shot off. That elusive shot of a Yeti, will be just a blur if you still had it set to 10 second shutter speed from the night landscapes from yesterday.
    24. For portraits of children always spot focus right between the eyes
    25. always have your camera and tripod by your side as you never know when the opportunity moment will arise to get THE shot
    26. When doing portrait shots of man's best friend (the dog) always focus on the eyes... a focused nose and blurry eyes just look silly.
    27. Look at the image in the viewfinder - not through the lens.
    28. DOF - Small number-small DOF. Large number-big DOF.
    29. Never pack your camera gear away in a wet or damp condition.
    30. Always double check your bag zippers/fasteners are closed before picking it up.
    31. Always turn off camera before changing lenses.
    32. Try to avoid changing lenses in wet or dusty conditions.
    33. Never hard scrub the glass on your lenses to clean, especially true for the sensor.
    34. Be Quiet. Some of the best shots happen when the subject doesn't know you're there (kids, animals, etc).
    35. Always look back before you leave.

  9. #29
    Member
    Join Date
    29 Oct 2008
    Location
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    1. Take photos early morning or night as there as less shadows
    2. Always make sure your battery is recharged (or you have spare batteries) so your camera doesn't suddenly die on you at the worst possible moment
    3. Get closer - if you can't get closer zoom in further, if you can't zoom in get closer
    4. Learn to use the histogram to adjust settings and get a good exposure.
    5. take the lens cap off doofus!
    6. Check that your camera is not set to auto ISO,(unless you definitely want it to be) learned this the hard way.... as have many others, I expect.
    7. Starting guide for obtaining a proper exposure of a full moon is to the aperture at f/11 and shutter speed at one over the ISO setting (eg. 1/125 for ISO 100). For pictures of a half moon, use the same shutter speed at f/8. For a quarter moon, f/5.6.
    8. Lenses and cameras never used to have anti-shake systems built into them. As shutter speeds got slower, camera shake was likely to blur your image, and you had to know what you could safely get away with! As a rule-of-thumb, the slowest shutter speed at which you could safely handhold a camera was usually considered to be one over the focal length of the lens. So, if you're using a 50mm lens, you could generally shoot at 1/60 sec or faster. A 100mm lens needed at least 1/125 sec; 1/300 for 300mm and so forth. Not enough light to do that? Then you had to use flash, a tripod, or brace your camera (and yourself) against a solid object.
    9. The classic advice is, "Expose for the highlights and let the shadows take care of themselves." This works with slide film and digital. But with negative film, especially colour negative film, you're actually better off overexposing by one stop.
    10. To stop action moving across the frame that's perpendicular to the lens axis, you need shutter speeds two stops faster than action moving toward or away from you. For action moving at a 45-degree angle to the lens axis, you can use a shutter speed one stop slower. For example: If a person running toward you at moderate speed can be stopped at 1/125 sec, you'll need a shutter speed of 1/500 sec to stop the subject moving across the frame, and a shutter speed of 1/250 sec to stop him if moving obliquely with respect to the camera.
    11. Before you ask the question - READ THE MANUAL!!
    12. Learn and understand "depth of field"
    13. When taking your camera out for the first time since a previous shoot verify all your settings are what you want for this new shoot so you don't use the previous shoot settings which may be wildly inappropriate.
    14. dont be afraid of a little fill flash to expose shadowed areas.
    15. Learn and understand the interrelationship between shutter speed, aperture and ISO.
    16. Make sure the camera is on when you go to take a shot
    17. When at a famous landmark, look for the angle you've never seen in another photo before
    18. Get down to children's height to take photo
    19. Know your equipment - to the point where it becomes second nature. The less you have to muck around in menus and think about settings, the more time you can spend on the much more important aspects of timing, lighting and composition. You will always be wanting a new lens, a new body etc - working with what you have will force you to be more creative.
    20. Start shooting raw and learn about white balance
    21. Learn to use exposure compensation (Ev) and handle the highlights better
    22. Keep it simple, in photography less equals more.
    23. Always put your camera on full auto when storing it, travelling etc. You never know when a great shot might present itself, and in Auto you can grab the camera and get the shot off. That elusive shot of a Yeti, will be just a blur if you still had it set to 10 second shutter speed from the night landscapes from yesterday.
    24. For portraits of children always spot focus right between the eyes
    25. always have your camera and tripod by your side as you never know when the opportunity moment will arise to get THE shot
    26. When doing portrait shots of man's best friend (the dog) always focus on the eyes... a focused nose and blurry eyes just look silly.
    27. Look at the image in the viewfinder - not through the lens.
    28. DOF - Small number-small DOF. Large number-big DOF.
    29. Never pack your camera gear away in a wet or damp condition.
    30. Always double check your bag zippers/fasteners are closed before picking it up.
    31. Always turn off camera before changing lenses.
    32. Try to avoid changing lenses in wet or dusty conditions.
    33. Never hard scrub the glass on your lenses to clean, especially true for the sensor.
    34. Be Quiet. Some of the best shots happen when the subject doesn't know you're there (kids, animals, etc).
    35. Always look back before you leave.
    36. For long exposure remember to use a tripod, a remote also helps to stop from camera shake when pressing the shutter button.
    37. When do Pano's use a tripod and turn IS OFF, IS can sometimes go crazy and cause a soft blurry image.
    38. Dont be shy to experiment, take lots of photos of the same thing with different angles and camera settings.
    39. Some images may look crappy in the playback mode on your camera, but might look good on the computer at home. So dont choose the keepers untill you veiw them on the computer.
    40. Never point or look through your lens directly at the sun.
    41. Always try and have your horizons straight in your photos, or straighten them in the editing process.
    Last edited by Hobberz; 31-01-2009 at 1:15am.
    CHEERS, GARY

    Canon 450D,18-55mm,55-250mm,RC-5 Wireless Remote,Tripod,Assorted Filters,Lowepro CameraBag.


    Feel free to Re-work my images, but please let me know what you did so i can learn to
    Constructive Critique Welcome

    Check out my FLICKR

  10. #30
    Member
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    We are nearly 1/2 way there thanks for your input guys!!!!!!!!!!

  11. #31
    Member
    Join Date
    13 Apr 2009
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    Melbourne
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    1. Take photos early morning or night as there as less shadows
    2. Always make sure your battery is recharged (or you have spare batteries) so your camera doesn't suddenly die on you at the worst possible moment
    3. Get closer - if you can't get closer zoom in further, if you can't zoom in get closer
    4. Learn to use the histogram to adjust settings and get a good exposure.
    5. take the lens cap off doofus!
    6. Check that your camera is not set to auto ISO,(unless you definitely want it to be) learned this the hard way.... as have many others, I expect.
    7. Starting guide for obtaining a proper exposure of a full moon is to the aperture at f/11 and shutter speed at one over the ISO setting (eg. 1/125 for ISO 100). For pictures of a half moon, use the same shutter speed at f/8. For a quarter moon, f/5.6.
    8. Lenses and cameras never used to have anti-shake systems built into them. As shutter speeds got slower, camera shake was likely to blur your image, and you had to know what you could safely get away with! As a rule-of-thumb, the slowest shutter speed at which you could safely handhold a camera was usually considered to be one over the focal length of the lens. So, if you're using a 50mm lens, you could generally shoot at 1/60 sec or faster. A 100mm lens needed at least 1/125 sec; 1/300 for 300mm and so forth. Not enough light to do that? Then you had to use flash, a tripod, or brace your camera (and yourself) against a solid object.
    9. The classic advice is, "Expose for the highlights and let the shadows take care of themselves." This works with slide film and digital. But with negative film, especially colour negative film, you're actually better off overexposing by one stop.
    10. To stop action moving across the frame that's perpendicular to the lens axis, you need shutter speeds two stops faster than action moving toward or away from you. For action moving at a 45-degree angle to the lens axis, you can use a shutter speed one stop slower. For example: If a person running toward you at moderate speed can be stopped at 1/125 sec, you'll need a shutter speed of 1/500 sec to stop the subject moving across the frame, and a shutter speed of 1/250 sec to stop him if moving obliquely with respect to the camera.
    11. Before you ask the question - READ THE MANUAL!!
    12. Learn and understand "depth of field"
    13. When taking your camera out for the first time since a previous shoot verify all your settings are what you want for this new shoot so you don't use the previous shoot settings which may be wildly inappropriate.
    14. dont be afraid of a little fill flash to expose shadowed areas.
    15. Learn and understand the interrelationship between shutter speed, aperture and ISO.
    16. Make sure the camera is on when you go to take a shot
    17. When at a famous landmark, look for the angle you've never seen in another photo before
    18. Get down to children's height to take photo
    19. Know your equipment - to the point where it becomes second nature. The less you have to muck around in menus and think about settings, the more time you can spend on the much more important aspects of timing, lighting and composition. You will always be wanting a new lens, a new body etc - working with what you have will force you to be more creative.
    20. Start shooting raw and learn about white balance
    21. Learn to use exposure compensation (Ev) and handle the highlights better
    22. Keep it simple, in photography less equals more.
    23. Always put your camera on full auto when storing it, travelling etc. You never know when a great shot might present itself, and in Auto you can grab the camera and get the shot off. That elusive shot of a Yeti, will be just a blur if you still had it set to 10 second shutter speed from the night landscapes from yesterday.
    24. For portraits of children always spot focus right between the eyes
    25. always have your camera and tripod by your side as you never know when the opportunity moment will arise to get THE shot
    26. When doing portrait shots of man's best friend (the dog) always focus on the eyes... a focused nose and blurry eyes just look silly.
    27. Look at the image in the viewfinder - not through the lens.
    28. DOF - Small number-small DOF. Large number-big DOF.
    29. Never pack your camera gear away in a wet or damp condition.
    30. Always double check your bag zippers/fasteners are closed before picking it up.
    31. Always turn off camera before changing lenses.
    32. Try to avoid changing lenses in wet or dusty conditions.
    33. Never hard scrub the glass on your lenses to clean, especially true for the sensor.
    34. Be Quiet. Some of the best shots happen when the subject doesn't know you're there (kids, animals, etc).
    35. Always look back before you leave.
    36. For long exposure remember to use a tripod, a remote also helps to stop from camera shake when pressing the shutter button.
    37. When do Pano's use a tripod and turn IS OFF, IS can sometimes go crazy and cause a soft blurry image.
    38. Dont be shy to experiment, take lots of photos of the same thing with different angles and camera settings.
    39. Some images may look crappy in the playback mode on your camera, but might look good on the computer at home. So dont choose the keepers untill you veiw them on the computer.
    40. Never point or look through your lens directly at the sun.
    41. Always try and have your horizons straight in your photos, or straighten them in the editing process.
    42. Never use cheap filters in front of expensive glass.
    D810 Fujifilm XT1 XE1 infrared 590nm converted
    Glass : wide selection

    Web: http://mellosphotography.com.au/
    Face Book : https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mello...82637858468895
    500px : http://500px.com/MellosPhotography

  12. #32
    Member
    Join Date
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    43. When shooting night photography, ALWAYS use the lowest ISO to avoid/reduce digital noise
    Hi Im Darren

    www.darrengrayphotography.com

    SONY A850 (FF)] + GRIP | SONY A350 (APS-C) + GRIP | SONY NEX-5 +16 2.8 + 18-55 E-MOUNT LENSES | CZ 85 1.4 | 50 1.4 | 28-75 2.8 | 70-200 2.8 | 2 x 42AMs | 24" imac | LR | CS4 | + loads of other junk


  13. #33
    It's all about the Light!
    Tech Admin
    Kym's Avatar
    Join Date
    15 Jun 2008
    Location
    Modbury, Adelaide
    Posts
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    1. Take photos early morning or night as there as less shadows
    2. Always make sure your battery is recharged (or you have spare batteries) so your camera doesn't suddenly die on you at the worst possible moment
    3. Get closer - if you can't get closer zoom in further, if you can't zoom in get closer
    4. Learn to use the histogram to adjust settings and get a good exposure.
    5. Take the lens cap off doofus!
    6. Check that your camera is not set to auto ISO,(unless you definitely want it to be) learned this the hard way.... as have many others, I expect.
    7. Starting guide for obtaining a proper exposure of a full moon is to the aperture at f/11 and shutter speed at one over the ISO setting (eg. 1/125 for ISO 100). For pictures of a half moon, use the same shutter speed at f/8. For a quarter moon, f/5.6.
    8. Lenses and cameras never used to have anti-shake systems built into them. As shutter speeds got slower, camera shake was likely to blur your image, and you had to know what you could safely get away with! As a rule-of-thumb, the slowest shutter speed at which you could safely handhold a camera was usually considered to be one over the focal length of the lens. So, if you're using a 50mm lens, you could generally shoot at 1/60 sec or faster. A 100mm lens needed at least 1/125 sec; 1/300 for 300mm and so forth. Not enough light to do that? Then you had to use flash, a tripod, or brace your camera (and yourself) against a solid object.
    9. The classic advice is, "Expose for the highlights and let the shadows take care of themselves." This works with slide film and digital. But with negative film, especially colour negative film, you're actually better off overexposing by one stop.
    10. To stop action moving across the frame that's perpendicular to the lens axis, you need shutter speeds two stops faster than action moving toward or away from you. For action moving at a 45-degree angle to the lens axis, you can use a shutter speed one stop slower. For example: If a person running toward you at moderate speed can be stopped at 1/125 sec, you'll need a shutter speed of 1/500 sec to stop the subject moving across the frame, and a shutter speed of 1/250 sec to stop him if moving obliquely with respect to the camera.
    11. Before you ask the question - READ THE MANUAL!!
    12. Learn and understand "depth of field"
    13. When taking your camera out for the first time since a previous shoot verify all your settings are what you want for this new shoot so you don't use the previous shoot settings which may be wildly inappropriate.
    14. dont be afraid of a little fill flash to expose shadowed areas.
    15. Learn and understand the interrelationship between shutter speed, aperture and ISO.
    16. Make sure the camera is on when you go to take a shot
    17. When at a famous landmark, look for the angle you've never seen in another photo before
    18. Get down to children's height to take photo
    19. Know your equipment - to the point where it becomes second nature. The less you have to muck around in menus and think about settings, the more time you can spend on the much more important aspects of timing, lighting and composition. You will always be wanting a new lens, a new body etc - working with what you have will force you to be more creative.
    20. Start shooting raw and learn about white balance
    21. Learn to use exposure compensation (Ev) and handle the highlights better
    22. Keep it simple, in photography less equals more.
    23. Always put your camera on full auto when storing it, travelling etc. You never know when a great shot might present itself, and in Auto you can grab the camera and get the shot off. That elusive shot of a Yeti, will be just a blur if you still had it set to 10 second shutter speed from the night landscapes from yesterday.
    24. For portraits of children always spot focus right between the eyes
    25. always have your camera and tripod by your side as you never know when the opportunity moment will arise to get THE shot
    26. When doing portrait shots of man's best friend (the dog) always focus on the eyes... a focused nose and blurry eyes just look silly.
    27. Look at the image in the viewfinder - not through the lens.
    28. DOF - Small number-small DOF. Large number-big DOF.
    29. Never pack your camera gear away in a wet or damp condition.
    30. Always double check your bag zippers/fasteners are closed before picking it up.
    31. Always turn off camera before changing lenses.
    32. Try to avoid changing lenses in wet or dusty conditions.
    33. Never hard scrub the glass on your lenses to clean, especially true for the sensor.
    34. Be Quiet. Some of the best shots happen when the subject doesn't know you're there (kids, animals, etc).
    35. Always look back before you leave.
    36. For long exposure remember to use a tripod, a remote also helps to stop from camera shake when pressing the shutter button.
    37. When do Pano's use a tripod and turn IS OFF, IS can sometimes go crazy and cause a soft blurry image.
    38. Don't be shy to experiment, take lots of photos of the same thing with different angles and camera settings.
    39. Some images may look crappy in the playback mode on your camera, but might look good on the computer at home. So dont choose the keepers untill you veiw them on the computer.
    40. Never point or look through your lens directly at the sun.
    41. Always try and have your horizons straight in your photos, or straighten them in the editing process.
    42. Never use cheap filters in front of expensive glass.
    43. When shooting night photography, ALWAYS use the lowest ISO to avoid/reduce digital noise
    44. Learn the Sunny 16 rule - it helps understanding exposure
    45. THINK! before you shoot. I.e. exposure, DoF, ISO, camera settings, composure etc.
    regards, Kym Gallery Honest & Direct Constructive Critique Appreciated! ©
    Digital & film, Bits of glass covering 10mm to 500mm, and other stuff



  14. #34
    In Training MarkChap's Avatar
    Join Date
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    Location
    Widgee,
    Posts
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    0 Thread(s)
    1. Take photos early morning or night as there as less shadows
    2. Always make sure your battery is recharged (or you have spare batteries) so your camera doesn't suddenly die on you at the worst possible moment
    3. Get closer - if you can't get closer zoom in further, if you can't zoom in get closer
    4. Learn to use the histogram to adjust settings and get a good exposure.
    5. Take the lens cap off doofus!
    6. Check that your camera is not set to auto ISO,(unless you definitely want it to be) learned this the hard way.... as have many others, I expect.
    7. Starting guide for obtaining a proper exposure of a full moon is to the aperture at f/11 and shutter speed at one over the ISO setting (eg. 1/125 for ISO 100). For pictures of a half moon, use the same shutter speed at f/8. For a quarter moon, f/5.6.
    8. Lenses and cameras never used to have anti-shake systems built into them. As shutter speeds got slower, camera shake was likely to blur your image, and you had to know what you could safely get away with! As a rule-of-thumb, the slowest shutter speed at which you could safely handhold a camera was usually considered to be one over the focal length of the lens. So, if you're using a 50mm lens, you could generally shoot at 1/60 sec or faster. A 100mm lens needed at least 1/125 sec; 1/300 for 300mm and so forth. Not enough light to do that? Then you had to use flash, a tripod, or brace your camera (and yourself) against a solid object.
    9. The classic advice is, "Expose for the highlights and let the shadows take care of themselves." This works with slide film and digital. But with negative film, especially colour negative film, you're actually better off overexposing by one stop.
    10. To stop action moving across the frame that's perpendicular to the lens axis, you need shutter speeds two stops faster than action moving toward or away from you. For action moving at a 45-degree angle to the lens axis, you can use a shutter speed one stop slower. For example: If a person running toward you at moderate speed can be stopped at 1/125 sec, you'll need a shutter speed of 1/500 sec to stop the subject moving across the frame, and a shutter speed of 1/250 sec to stop him if moving obliquely with respect to the camera.
    11. Before you ask the question - READ THE MANUAL!!
    12. Learn and understand "depth of field"
    13. When taking your camera out for the first time since a previous shoot verify all your settings are what you want for this new shoot so you don't use the previous shoot settings which may be wildly inappropriate.
    14. dont be afraid of a little fill flash to expose shadowed areas.
    15. Learn and understand the interrelationship between shutter speed, aperture and ISO.
    16. Make sure the camera is on when you go to take a shot
    17. When at a famous landmark, look for the angle you've never seen in another photo before
    18. Get down to children's height to take photo
    19. Know your equipment - to the point where it becomes second nature. The less you have to muck around in menus and think about settings, the more time you can spend on the much more important aspects of timing, lighting and composition. You will always be wanting a new lens, a new body etc - working with what you have will force you to be more creative.
    20. Start shooting raw and learn about white balance
    21. Learn to use exposure compensation (Ev) and handle the highlights better
    22. Keep it simple, in photography less equals more.
    23. Always put your camera on full auto when storing it, travelling etc. You never know when a great shot might present itself, and in Auto you can grab the camera and get the shot off. That elusive shot of a Yeti, will be just a blur if you still had it set to 10 second shutter speed from the night landscapes from yesterday.
    24. For portraits of children always spot focus right between the eyes
    25. always have your camera and tripod by your side as you never know when the opportunity moment will arise to get THE shot
    26. When doing portrait shots of man's best friend (the dog) always focus on the eyes... a focused nose and blurry eyes just look silly.
    27. Look at the image in the viewfinder - not through the lens.
    28. DOF - Small number-small DOF. Large number-big DOF.
    29. Never pack your camera gear away in a wet or damp condition.
    30. Always double check your bag zippers/fasteners are closed before picking it up.
    31. Always turn off camera before changing lenses.
    32. Try to avoid changing lenses in wet or dusty conditions.
    33. Never hard scrub the glass on your lenses to clean, especially true for the sensor.
    34. Be Quiet. Some of the best shots happen when the subject doesn't know you're there (kids, animals, etc).
    35. Always look back before you leave.
    36. For long exposure remember to use a tripod, a remote also helps to stop from camera shake when pressing the shutter button.
    37. When do Pano's use a tripod and turn IS OFF, IS can sometimes go crazy and cause a soft blurry image.
    38. Don't be shy to experiment, take lots of photos of the same thing with different angles and camera settings.
    39. Some images may look crappy in the playback mode on your camera, but might look good on the computer at home. So dont choose the keepers untill you veiw them on the computer.
    40. Never point or look through your lens directly at the sun.
    41. Always try and have your horizons straight in your photos, or straighten them in the editing process.
    42. Never use cheap filters in front of expensive glass.
    43. When shooting night photography, ALWAYS use the lowest ISO to avoid/reduce digital noise
    44. Learn the Sunny 16 rule - it helps understanding exposure
    45. THINK! before you shoot. I.e. exposure, DoF, ISO, camera settings, composure etc.
    46. When shooting portraits, be aware of poles/plants/projections growing from the head of your subject.
    Smoke Alarms Save Lives, Install One Today
    I shoot Canon
    Cheers, Mark


  15. #35
    Member
    Join Date
    20 Mar 2009
    Location
    Brisbane
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    1. Take photos early morning or night as there as less shadows
    2. Always make sure your battery is recharged (or you have spare batteries) so your camera doesn't suddenly die on you at the worst possible moment
    3. Get closer - if you can't get closer zoom in further, if you can't zoom in get closer
    4. Learn to use the histogram to adjust settings and get a good exposure.
    5. Take the lens cap off doofus!
    6. Check that your camera is not set to auto ISO,(unless you definitely want it to be) learned this the hard way.... as have many others, I expect.
    7. Starting guide for obtaining a proper exposure of a full moon is to the aperture at f/11 and shutter speed at one over the ISO setting (eg. 1/125 for ISO 100). For pictures of a half moon, use the same shutter speed at f/8. For a quarter moon, f/5.6.
    8. Lenses and cameras never used to have anti-shake systems built into them. As shutter speeds got slower, camera shake was likely to blur your image, and you had to know what you could safely get away with! As a rule-of-thumb, the slowest shutter speed at which you could safely handhold a camera was usually considered to be one over the focal length of the lens. So, if you're using a 50mm lens, you could generally shoot at 1/60 sec or faster. A 100mm lens needed at least 1/125 sec; 1/300 for 300mm and so forth. Not enough light to do that? Then you had to use flash, a tripod, or brace your camera (and yourself) against a solid object.
    9. The classic advice is, "Expose for the highlights and let the shadows take care of themselves." This works with slide film and digital. But with negative film, especially colour negative film, you're actually better off overexposing by one stop.
    10. To stop action moving across the frame that's perpendicular to the lens axis, you need shutter speeds two stops faster than action moving toward or away from you. For action moving at a 45-degree angle to the lens axis, you can use a shutter speed one stop slower. For example: If a person running toward you at moderate speed can be stopped at 1/125 sec, you'll need a shutter speed of 1/500 sec to stop the subject moving across the frame, and a shutter speed of 1/250 sec to stop him if moving obliquely with respect to the camera.
    11. Before you ask the question - READ THE MANUAL!!
    12. Learn and understand "depth of field"
    13. When taking your camera out for the first time since a previous shoot verify all your settings are what you want for this new shoot so you don't use the previous shoot settings which may be wildly inappropriate.
    14. dont be afraid of a little fill flash to expose shadowed areas.
    15. Learn and understand the interrelationship between shutter speed, aperture and ISO.
    16. Make sure the camera is on when you go to take a shot
    17. When at a famous landmark, look for the angle you've never seen in another photo before
    18. Get down to children's height to take photo
    19. Know your equipment - to the point where it becomes second nature. The less you have to muck around in menus and think about settings, the more time you can spend on the much more important aspects of timing, lighting and composition. You will always be wanting a new lens, a new body etc - working with what you have will force you to be more creative.
    20. Start shooting raw and learn about white balance
    21. Learn to use exposure compensation (Ev) and handle the highlights better
    22. Keep it simple, in photography less equals more.
    23. Always put your camera on full auto when storing it, travelling etc. You never know when a great shot might present itself, and in Auto you can grab the camera and get the shot off. That elusive shot of a Yeti, will be just a blur if you still had it set to 10 second shutter speed from the night landscapes from yesterday.
    24. For portraits of children always spot focus right between the eyes
    25. always have your camera and tripod by your side as you never know when the opportunity moment will arise to get THE shot
    26. When doing portrait shots of man's best friend (the dog) always focus on the eyes... a focused nose and blurry eyes just look silly.
    27. Look at the image in the viewfinder - not through the lens.
    28. DOF - Small number-small DOF. Large number-big DOF.
    29. Never pack your camera gear away in a wet or damp condition.
    30. Always double check your bag zippers/fasteners are closed before picking it up.
    31. Always turn off camera before changing lenses.
    32. Try to avoid changing lenses in wet or dusty conditions.
    33. Never hard scrub the glass on your lenses to clean, especially true for the sensor.
    34. Be Quiet. Some of the best shots happen when the subject doesn't know you're there (kids, animals, etc).
    35. Always look back before you leave.
    36. For long exposure remember to use a tripod, a remote also helps to stop from camera shake when pressing the shutter button.
    37. When do Pano's use a tripod and turn IS OFF, IS can sometimes go crazy and cause a soft blurry image.
    38. Don't be shy to experiment, take lots of photos of the same thing with different angles and camera settings.
    39. Some images may look crappy in the playback mode on your camera, but might look good on the computer at home. So dont choose the keepers untill you veiw them on the computer.
    40. Never point or look through your lens directly at the sun.
    41. Always try and have your horizons straight in your photos, or straighten them in the editing process.
    42. Never use cheap filters in front of expensive glass.
    43. When shooting night photography, ALWAYS use the lowest ISO to avoid/reduce digital noise
    44. Learn the Sunny 16 rule - it helps understanding exposure
    45. THINK! before you shoot. I.e. exposure, DoF, ISO, camera settings, composure etc.
    46. When shooting portraits, be aware of poles/plants/projections growing from the head of your subject.
    47. Enjoy what you do.
    ______________________

    FINE ART PRINTS: www.kanegledhill.com.au
    FLICKR: www.flickr.com/photos/kanegledhill
    FB: www.facebook.com/kanegledhillphotography

    Canon 5D Mk II | Canon 50D | Canon EF 17-40 f/4 L | Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II Lens | Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8 L USM Lens | Canon EF 70-200mm f/4 L USM Lens. Fotoman 617 (medium format film)

  16. #36
    Member NonComposMentis's Avatar
    Join Date
    16 Aug 2008
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    1. Take photos early morning or night as there as less shadows
    2. Always make sure your battery is recharged (or you have spare batteries) so your camera doesn't suddenly die on you at the worst possible moment
    3. Get closer - if you can't get closer zoom in further, if you can't zoom in get closer
    4. Learn to use the histogram to adjust settings and get a good exposure.
    5. Take the lens cap off doofus!
    6. Check that your camera is not set to auto ISO,(unless you definitely want it to be) learned this the hard way.... as have many others, I expect.
    7. Starting guide for obtaining a proper exposure of a full moon is to the aperture at f/11 and shutter speed at one over the ISO setting (eg. 1/125 for ISO 100). For pictures of a half moon, use the same shutter speed at f/8. For a quarter moon, f/5.6.
    8. Lenses and cameras never used to have anti-shake systems built into them. As shutter speeds got slower, camera shake was likely to blur your image, and you had to know what you could safely get away with! As a rule-of-thumb, the slowest shutter speed at which you could safely handhold a camera was usually considered to be one over the focal length of the lens. So, if you're using a 50mm lens, you could generally shoot at 1/60 sec or faster. A 100mm lens needed at least 1/125 sec; 1/300 for 300mm and so forth. Not enough light to do that? Then you had to use flash, a tripod, or brace your camera (and yourself) against a solid object.
    9. The classic advice is, "Expose for the highlights and let the shadows take care of themselves." This works with slide film and digital. But with negative film, especially colour negative film, you're actually better off overexposing by one stop.
    10. To stop action moving across the frame that's perpendicular to the lens axis, you need shutter speeds two stops faster than action moving toward or away from you. For action moving at a 45-degree angle to the lens axis, you can use a shutter speed one stop slower. For example: If a person running toward you at moderate speed can be stopped at 1/125 sec, you'll need a shutter speed of 1/500 sec to stop the subject moving across the frame, and a shutter speed of 1/250 sec to stop him if moving obliquely with respect to the camera.
    11. Before you ask the question - READ THE MANUAL!!
    12. Learn and understand "depth of field"
    13. When taking your camera out for the first time since a previous shoot verify all your settings are what you want for this new shoot so you don't use the previous shoot settings which may be wildly inappropriate.
    14. dont be afraid of a little fill flash to expose shadowed areas.
    15. Learn and understand the interrelationship between shutter speed, aperture and ISO.
    16. Make sure the camera is on when you go to take a shot
    17. When at a famous landmark, look for the angle you've never seen in another photo before
    18. Get down to children's height to take photo
    19. Know your equipment - to the point where it becomes second nature. The less you have to muck around in menus and think about settings, the more time you can spend on the much more important aspects of timing, lighting and composition. You will always be wanting a new lens, a new body etc - working with what you have will force you to be more creative.
    20. Start shooting raw and learn about white balance
    21. Learn to use exposure compensation (Ev) and handle the highlights better
    22. Keep it simple, in photography less equals more.
    23. Always put your camera on full auto when storing it, travelling etc. You never know when a great shot might present itself, and in Auto you can grab the camera and get the shot off. That elusive shot of a Yeti, will be just a blur if you still had it set to 10 second shutter speed from the night landscapes from yesterday.
    24. For portraits of children always spot focus right between the eyes
    25. always have your camera and tripod by your side as you never know when the opportunity moment will arise to get THE shot
    26. When doing portrait shots of man's best friend (the dog) always focus on the eyes... a focused nose and blurry eyes just look silly.
    27. Look at the image in the viewfinder - not through the lens.
    28. DOF - Small number-small DOF. Large number-big DOF.
    29. Never pack your camera gear away in a wet or damp condition.
    30. Always double check your bag zippers/fasteners are closed before picking it up.
    31. Always turn off camera before changing lenses.
    32. Try to avoid changing lenses in wet or dusty conditions.
    33. Never hard scrub the glass on your lenses to clean, especially true for the sensor.
    34. Be Quiet. Some of the best shots happen when the subject doesn't know you're there (kids, animals, etc).
    35. Always look back before you leave.
    36. For long exposure remember to use a tripod, a remote also helps to stop from camera shake when pressing the shutter button.
    37. When do Pano's use a tripod and turn IS OFF, IS can sometimes go crazy and cause a soft blurry image.
    38. Don't be shy to experiment, take lots of photos of the same thing with different angles and camera settings.
    39. Some images may look crappy in the playback mode on your camera, but might look good on the computer at home. So dont choose the keepers untill you veiw them on the computer.
    40. Never point or look through your lens directly at the sun.
    41. Always try and have your horizons straight in your photos, or straighten them in the editing process.
    42. Never use cheap filters in front of expensive glass.
    43. When shooting night photography, ALWAYS use the lowest ISO to avoid/reduce digital noise
    44. Learn the Sunny 16 rule - it helps understanding exposure
    45. THINK! before you shoot. I.e. exposure, DoF, ISO, camera settings, composure etc.
    46. When shooting portraits, be aware of poles/plants/projections growing from the head of your subject.
    47. Enjoy what you do.
    48. As much as the rule of thirds is important and one should keep that in mind when composing, remember that rules are meant to be broken.

  17. #37
    It's all about the Light!
    Tech Admin
    Kym's Avatar
    Join Date
    15 Jun 2008
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    Modbury, Adelaide
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    1. Take photos early morning or night as there as less shadows
    2. Always make sure your battery is recharged (or you have spare batteries) so your camera doesn't suddenly die on you at the worst possible moment
    3. Get closer - if you can't get closer zoom in further, if you can't zoom in get closer
    4. Learn to use the histogram to adjust settings and get a good exposure.
    5. Take the lens cap off doofus!
    6. Check that your camera is not set to auto ISO,(unless you definitely want it to be) learned this the hard way.... as have many others, I expect.
    7. Starting guide for obtaining a proper exposure of a full moon is to the aperture at f/11 and shutter speed at one over the ISO setting (eg. 1/125 for ISO 100). For pictures of a half moon, use the same shutter speed at f/8. For a quarter moon, f/5.6.
    8. Lenses and cameras never used to have anti-shake systems built into them. As shutter speeds got slower, camera shake was likely to blur your image, and you had to know what you could safely get away with! As a rule-of-thumb, the slowest shutter speed at which you could safely handhold a camera was usually considered to be one over the focal length of the lens. So, if you're using a 50mm lens, you could generally shoot at 1/60 sec or faster. A 100mm lens needed at least 1/125 sec; 1/300 for 300mm and so forth. Not enough light to do that? Then you had to use flash, a tripod, or brace your camera (and yourself) against a solid object.
    9. The classic advice is, "Expose for the highlights and let the shadows take care of themselves." This works with slide film and digital. But with negative film, especially colour negative film, you're actually better off overexposing by one stop.
    10. To stop action moving across the frame that's perpendicular to the lens axis, you need shutter speeds two stops faster than action moving toward or away from you. For action moving at a 45-degree angle to the lens axis, you can use a shutter speed one stop slower. For example: If a person running toward you at moderate speed can be stopped at 1/125 sec, you'll need a shutter speed of 1/500 sec to stop the subject moving across the frame, and a shutter speed of 1/250 sec to stop him if moving obliquely with respect to the camera.
    11. Before you ask the question - READ THE MANUAL!!
    12. Learn and understand "depth of field"
    13. When taking your camera out for the first time since a previous shoot verify all your settings are what you want for this new shoot so you don't use the previous shoot settings which may be wildly inappropriate.
    14. dont be afraid of a little fill flash to expose shadowed areas.
    15. Learn and understand the interrelationship between shutter speed, aperture and ISO.
    16. Make sure the camera is on when you go to take a shot
    17. When at a famous landmark, look for the angle you've never seen in another photo before
    18. Get down to children's height to take photo
    19. Know your equipment - to the point where it becomes second nature. The less you have to muck around in menus and think about settings, the more time you can spend on the much more important aspects of timing, lighting and composition. You will always be wanting a new lens, a new body etc - working with what you have will force you to be more creative.
    20. Start shooting raw and learn about white balance
    21. Learn to use exposure compensation (Ev) and handle the highlights better
    22. Keep it simple, in photography less equals more.
    23. Always put your camera on full auto when storing it, travelling etc. You never know when a great shot might present itself, and in Auto you can grab the camera and get the shot off. That elusive shot of a Yeti, will be just a blur if you still had it set to 10 second shutter speed from the night landscapes from yesterday.
    24. For portraits of children always spot focus right between the eyes
    25. always have your camera and tripod by your side as you never know when the opportunity moment will arise to get THE shot
    26. When doing portrait shots of man's best friend (the dog) always focus on the eyes... a focused nose and blurry eyes just look silly.
    27. Look at the image in the viewfinder - not through the lens.
    28. DOF - Small number-small DOF. Large number-big DOF.
    29. Never pack your camera gear away in a wet or damp condition.
    30. Always double check your bag zippers/fasteners are closed before picking it up.
    31. Always turn off camera before changing lenses.
    32. Try to avoid changing lenses in wet or dusty conditions.
    33. Never hard scrub the glass on your lenses to clean, especially true for the sensor.
    34. Be Quiet. Some of the best shots happen when the subject doesn't know you're there (kids, animals, etc).
    35. Always look back before you leave.
    36. For long exposure remember to use a tripod, a remote also helps to stop from camera shake when pressing the shutter button.
    37. When do Pano's use a tripod and turn IS OFF, IS can sometimes go crazy and cause a soft blurry image.
    38. Don't be shy to experiment, take lots of photos of the same thing with different angles and camera settings.
    39. Some images may look crappy in the playback mode on your camera, but might look good on the computer at home. So dont choose the keepers untill you veiw them on the computer.
    40. Never point or look through your lens directly at the sun.
    41. Always try and have your horizons straight in your photos, or straighten them in the editing process.
    42. Never use cheap filters in front of expensive glass.
    43. When shooting night photography, ALWAYS use the lowest ISO to avoid/reduce digital noise
    44. Learn the Sunny 16 rule - it helps understanding exposure
    45. THINK! before you shoot. I.e. exposure, DoF, ISO, camera settings, composure etc.
    46. When shooting portraits, be aware of poles/plants/projections growing from the head of your subject.
    47. Enjoy what you do.
    48. As much as the rule of thirds is important and one should keep that in mind when composing, remember that rules are meant to be broken.
    49. Have a simple clear subject for your image
    50. Using the natural surroundings to frame your composure can add more meaning and focus to your main subject. We can use almost anything as a frame, eg. tree branches, bushes, archways, tall buildings and doorways. Keep the focus on the main subject, and use a high f/stop when you need more depth of field.
    51. The ‘keep it simple silly’ rule is just what it says. You should keep your composition relatively simple. If you have zoomed in close to your main subject, use appropriate Depth of Field to make the background out of focus, or make sure that nothing in the background interferes with the main subject, thus removing any distractions. This stops unwanted elements pulling the viewers eye away from the main subject.
    52. Use leading lines to draw the viewer's eye through the photograph. This is an especially powerful technique to draw the viewer's attention to one or more intended subjects or a single focal point. Please be careful when using leading lines, make sure the lines don’t distract the viewer or lead them away from the main subject. The use of roads, water courses, fences, walls etc. can be useful as leading lines.
    53. A different angle or perspective can often add impact to a photograph. Think lines, angles and height. Try crouching down, kneeling , climbing up higher, moving to the left or right. Better still, try to take a photo from a different angle, through a window, doorway, or an archway. Experiment with lenses. You could even invest in a fisheye lens, which will give you a whole new perspective on everything.

  18. #38
    Shore Crawler Dylan & Marianne's Avatar
    Join Date
    21 Mar 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
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    1. Take photos early morning or night as there as less shadows
    2. Always make sure your battery is recharged (or you have spare batteries) so your camera doesn't suddenly die on you at the worst possible moment
    3. Get closer - if you can't get closer zoom in further, if you can't zoom in get closer
    4. Learn to use the histogram to adjust settings and get a good exposure.
    5. Take the lens cap off doofus!
    6. Check that your camera is not set to auto ISO,(unless you definitely want it to be) learned this the hard way.... as have many others, I expect.
    7. Starting guide for obtaining a proper exposure of a full moon is to the aperture at f/11 and shutter speed at one over the ISO setting (eg. 1/125 for ISO 100). For pictures of a half moon, use the same shutter speed at f/8. For a quarter moon, f/5.6.
    8. Lenses and cameras never used to have anti-shake systems built into them. As shutter speeds got slower, camera shake was likely to blur your image, and you had to know what you could safely get away with! As a rule-of-thumb, the slowest shutter speed at which you could safely handhold a camera was usually considered to be one over the focal length of the lens. So, if you're using a 50mm lens, you could generally shoot at 1/60 sec or faster. A 100mm lens needed at least 1/125 sec; 1/300 for 300mm and so forth. Not enough light to do that? Then you had to use flash, a tripod, or brace your camera (and yourself) against a solid object.
    9. The classic advice is, "Expose for the highlights and let the shadows take care of themselves." This works with slide film and digital. But with negative film, especially colour negative film, you're actually better off overexposing by one stop.
    10. To stop action moving across the frame that's perpendicular to the lens axis, you need shutter speeds two stops faster than action moving toward or away from you. For action moving at a 45-degree angle to the lens axis, you can use a shutter speed one stop slower. For example: If a person running toward you at moderate speed can be stopped at 1/125 sec, you'll need a shutter speed of 1/500 sec to stop the subject moving across the frame, and a shutter speed of 1/250 sec to stop him if moving obliquely with respect to the camera.
    11. Before you ask the question - READ THE MANUAL!!
    12. Learn and understand "depth of field"
    13. When taking your camera out for the first time since a previous shoot verify all your settings are what you want for this new shoot so you don't use the previous shoot settings which may be wildly inappropriate.
    14. dont be afraid of a little fill flash to expose shadowed areas.
    15. Learn and understand the interrelationship between shutter speed, aperture and ISO.
    16. Make sure the camera is on when you go to take a shot
    17. When at a famous landmark, look for the angle you've never seen in another photo before
    18. Get down to children's height to take photo
    19. Know your equipment - to the point where it becomes second nature. The less you have to muck around in menus and think about settings, the more time you can spend on the much more important aspects of timing, lighting and composition. You will always be wanting a new lens, a new body etc - working with what you have will force you to be more creative.
    20. Start shooting raw and learn about white balance
    21. Learn to use exposure compensation (Ev) and handle the highlights better
    22. Keep it simple, in photography less equals more.
    23. Always put your camera on full auto when storing it, travelling etc. You never know when a great shot might present itself, and in Auto you can grab the camera and get the shot off. That elusive shot of a Yeti, will be just a blur if you still had it set to 10 second shutter speed from the night landscapes from yesterday.
    24. For portraits of children always spot focus right between the eyes
    25. always have your camera and tripod by your side as you never know when the opportunity moment will arise to get THE shot
    26. When doing portrait shots of man's best friend (the dog) always focus on the eyes... a focused nose and blurry eyes just look silly.
    27. Look at the image in the viewfinder - not through the lens.
    28. DOF - Small number-small DOF. Large number-big DOF.
    29. Never pack your camera gear away in a wet or damp condition.
    30. Always double check your bag zippers/fasteners are closed before picking it up.
    31. Always turn off camera before changing lenses.
    32. Try to avoid changing lenses in wet or dusty conditions.
    33. Never hard scrub the glass on your lenses to clean, especially true for the sensor.
    34. Be Quiet. Some of the best shots happen when the subject doesn't know you're there (kids, animals, etc).
    35. Always look back before you leave.
    36. For long exposure remember to use a tripod, a remote also helps to stop from camera shake when pressing the shutter button.
    37. When do Pano's use a tripod and turn IS OFF, IS can sometimes go crazy and cause a soft blurry image.
    38. Don't be shy to experiment, take lots of photos of the same thing with different angles and camera settings.
    39. Some images may look crappy in the playback mode on your camera, but might look good on the computer at home. So dont choose the keepers untill you veiw them on the computer.
    40. Never point or look through your lens directly at the sun.
    41. Always try and have your horizons straight in your photos, or straighten them in the editing process.
    42. Never use cheap filters in front of expensive glass.
    43. When shooting night photography, ALWAYS use the lowest ISO to avoid/reduce digital noise
    44. Learn the Sunny 16 rule - it helps understanding exposure
    45. THINK! before you shoot. I.e. exposure, DoF, ISO, camera settings, composure etc.
    46. When shooting portraits, be aware of poles/plants/projections growing from the head of your subject.
    47. Enjoy what you do.
    48. As much as the rule of thirds is important and one should keep that in mind when composing, remember that rules are meant to be broken.
    49. Have a simple clear subject for your image
    50. Using the natural surroundings to frame your composure can add more meaning and focus to your main subject. We can use almost anything as a frame, eg. tree branches, bushes, archways, tall buildings and doorways. Keep the focus on the main subject, and use a high f/stop when you need more depth of field.
    51. The ‘keep it simple silly’ rule is just what it says. You should keep your composition relatively simple. If you have zoomed in close to your main subject, use appropriate Depth of Field to make the background out of focus, or make sure that nothing in the background interferes with the main subject, thus removing any distractions. This stops unwanted elements pulling the viewers eye away from the main subject.
    52. Use leading lines to draw the viewer's eye through the photograph. This is an especially powerful technique to draw the viewer's attention to one or more intended subjects or a single focal point. Please be careful when using leading lines, make sure the lines don’t distract the viewer or lead them away from the main subject. The use of roads, water courses, fences, walls etc. can be useful as leading lines.
    53. A different angle or perspective can often add impact to a photograph. Think lines, angles and height. Try crouching down, kneeling , climbing up higher, moving to the left or right. Better still, try to take a photo from a different angle, through a window, doorway, or an archway. Experiment with lenses. You could even invest in a fisheye lens, which will give you a whole new perspective on everything.
    54. Patience. It's better to consider a composition thoroughly (and technical aspects ) and take a single set of good images rather than take a scatter gun approach and shoot anything and everything in the area.
    Call me Dylan! www.everlookphotography.com | www.everlookphotography.wordpress.com | www.flickr.com/photos/dmtoh
    Canon EOS 5dmk3 : 17-40 F4 L, 70-200F2.8 canon L, 24-70mm canon L, Gitzo Safari +1178 ballhead. |Canon 5dmkII, 16-35mmF2.8 II L, Gitzo 2541 )
    Singh Ray/Hitech/Lee assorted filters, Z pro modified system Cokin holder
    Post : Lightroom 3.6 catalogue -> Export as 16bit TIFF, Edited CS5 -> resized for web.

  19. #39
    Member Brian S R's Avatar
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    55. Bring an extra memory card

  20. #40
    Member
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by dtoh View Post
    1. Take photos early morning or night as there as less shadows
    2. Always make sure your battery is recharged (or you have spare batteries) so your camera doesn't suddenly die on you at the worst possible moment
    3. Get closer - if you can't get closer zoom in further, if you can't zoom in get closer
    4. Learn to use the histogram to adjust settings and get a good exposure.
    5. Take the lens cap off doofus!
    6. Check that your camera is not set to auto ISO,(unless you definitely want it to be) learned this the hard way.... as have many others, I expect.
    7. Starting guide for obtaining a proper exposure of a full moon is to the aperture at f/11 and shutter speed at one over the ISO setting (eg. 1/125 for ISO 100). For pictures of a half moon, use the same shutter speed at f/8. For a quarter moon, f/5.6.
    8. Lenses and cameras never used to have anti-shake systems built into them. As shutter speeds got slower, camera shake was likely to blur your image, and you had to know what you could safely get away with! As a rule-of-thumb, the slowest shutter speed at which you could safely handhold a camera was usually considered to be one over the focal length of the lens. So, if you're using a 50mm lens, you could generally shoot at 1/60 sec or faster. A 100mm lens needed at least 1/125 sec; 1/300 for 300mm and so forth. Not enough light to do that? Then you had to use flash, a tripod, or brace your camera (and yourself) against a solid object.
    9. The classic advice is, "Expose for the highlights and let the shadows take care of themselves." This works with slide film and digital. But with negative film, especially colour negative film, you're actually better off overexposing by one stop.
    10. To stop action moving across the frame that's perpendicular to the lens axis, you need shutter speeds two stops faster than action moving toward or away from you. For action moving at a 45-degree angle to the lens axis, you can use a shutter speed one stop slower. For example: If a person running toward you at moderate speed can be stopped at 1/125 sec, you'll need a shutter speed of 1/500 sec to stop the subject moving across the frame, and a shutter speed of 1/250 sec to stop him if moving obliquely with respect to the camera.
    11. Before you ask the question - READ THE MANUAL!!
    12. Learn and understand "depth of field"
    13. When taking your camera out for the first time since a previous shoot verify all your settings are what you want for this new shoot so you don't use the previous shoot settings which may be wildly inappropriate.
    14. dont be afraid of a little fill flash to expose shadowed areas.
    15. Learn and understand the interrelationship between shutter speed, aperture and ISO.
    16. Make sure the camera is on when you go to take a shot
    17. When at a famous landmark, look for the angle you've never seen in another photo before
    18. Get down to children's height to take photo
    19. Know your equipment - to the point where it becomes second nature. The less you have to muck around in menus and think about settings, the more time you can spend on the much more important aspects of timing, lighting and composition. You will always be wanting a new lens, a new body etc - working with what you have will force you to be more creative.
    20. Start shooting raw and learn about white balance
    21. Learn to use exposure compensation (Ev) and handle the highlights better
    22. Keep it simple, in photography less equals more.
    23. Always put your camera on full auto when storing it, travelling etc. You never know when a great shot might present itself, and in Auto you can grab the camera and get the shot off. That elusive shot of a Yeti, will be just a blur if you still had it set to 10 second shutter speed from the night landscapes from yesterday.
    24. For portraits of children always spot focus right between the eyes
    25. always have your camera and tripod by your side as you never know when the opportunity moment will arise to get THE shot
    26. When doing portrait shots of man's best friend (the dog) always focus on the eyes... a focused nose and blurry eyes just look silly.
    27. Look at the image in the viewfinder - not through the lens.
    28. DOF - Small number-small DOF. Large number-big DOF.
    29. Never pack your camera gear away in a wet or damp condition.
    30. Always double check your bag zippers/fasteners are closed before picking it up.
    31. Always turn off camera before changing lenses.
    32. Try to avoid changing lenses in wet or dusty conditions.
    33. Never hard scrub the glass on your lenses to clean, especially true for the sensor.
    34. Be Quiet. Some of the best shots happen when the subject doesn't know you're there (kids, animals, etc).
    35. Always look back before you leave.
    36. For long exposure remember to use a tripod, a remote also helps to stop from camera shake when pressing the shutter button.
    37. When do Pano's use a tripod and turn IS OFF, IS can sometimes go crazy and cause a soft blurry image.
    38. Don't be shy to experiment, take lots of photos of the same thing with different angles and camera settings.
    39. Some images may look crappy in the playback mode on your camera, but might look good on the computer at home. So dont choose the keepers untill you veiw them on the computer.
    40. Never point or look through your lens directly at the sun.
    41. Always try and have your horizons straight in your photos, or straighten them in the editing process.
    42. Never use cheap filters in front of expensive glass.
    43. When shooting night photography, ALWAYS use the lowest ISO to avoid/reduce digital noise
    44. Learn the Sunny 16 rule - it helps understanding exposure
    45. THINK! before you shoot. I.e. exposure, DoF, ISO, camera settings, composure etc.
    46. When shooting portraits, be aware of poles/plants/projections growing from the head of your subject.
    47. Enjoy what you do.
    48. As much as the rule of thirds is important and one should keep that in mind when composing, remember that rules are meant to be broken.
    49. Have a simple clear subject for your image
    50. Using the natural surroundings to frame your composure can add more meaning and focus to your main subject. We can use almost anything as a frame, eg. tree branches, bushes, archways, tall buildings and doorways. Keep the focus on the main subject, and use a high f/stop when you need more depth of field.
    51. The ‘keep it simple silly’ rule is just what it says. You should keep your composition relatively simple. If you have zoomed in close to your main subject, use appropriate Depth of Field to make the background out of focus, or make sure that nothing in the background interferes with the main subject, thus removing any distractions. This stops unwanted elements pulling the viewers eye away from the main subject.
    52. Use leading lines to draw the viewer's eye through the photograph. This is an especially powerful technique to draw the viewer's attention to one or more intended subjects or a single focal point. Please be careful when using leading lines, make sure the lines don’t distract the viewer or lead them away from the main subject. The use of roads, water courses, fences, walls etc. can be useful as leading lines.
    53. A different angle or perspective can often add impact to a photograph. Think lines, angles and height. Try crouching down, kneeling , climbing up higher, moving to the left or right. Better still, try to take a photo from a different angle, through a window, doorway, or an archway. Experiment with lenses. You could even invest in a fisheye lens, which will give you a whole new perspective on everything.
    54. Patience. It's better to consider a composition thoroughly (and technical aspects ) and take a single set of good images rather than take a scatter gun approach and shoot anything and everything in the area.
    55. Bring an extra memory card
    56.Never stand in the one spot and compose by zooming in and out. Learn what different focal lengths look like, previsualise the shot, set you focal lenght on your lens (or change to a different prime lens if required), then compose your shot by moving closer or further away from your subject.
    57.If you are using a light meter built into your camera (reflective light meter), learn how it is calibrated and why there is a need to adjust for subjects with different reflectance/luminance.
    58.Study different subject's luminance.

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