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Thread: Bright spot

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    Ausphotography Regular jamesmartin's Avatar
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    Bright spot

    Not sure what its technically called but its a bright spot on the rock, caused by the bright light from where the sun is rising up. Was wondering what the best way is to fix it in either LR or PS without losing thw detail in the rock?
    Also is there a way to stop it happening again while shooting by changing settings?

    2D8A9365.jpg
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    Ausphotography Addict Geoff79's Avatar
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    Smarter people than I will have better ideas than I. But one cheap and nasty thing to do in PA is; create a blank layer, hold option/alt and click the brush tool into the area of rock featuring the colour/s you desire, change blend mode to ‘Colour’ and brush into the affected area. Adjust opacity accordingly. Cheap and nasty but it can kind of work sometimes.

    This is just off the top of my head and as always, poorly explained. Please feel free to ask further questions for better explanation.

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    Member Colin B's Avatar
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    I must be geting old or maybe my glasses need updating because I can't see any "bright spot" on that rock apart from a few sparkly bits. If anything, I would use Photoshop's "enhance - adjust lighting- shadows/highlights" menu to get a little more light and detail into the darker areas.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff79 View Post
    Smarter people than I will have better ideas than I. But one cheap and nasty thing to do in PA is; create a blank layer, hold option/alt and click the brush tool into the area of rock featuring the colour/s you desire, change blend mode to ‘Colour’ and brush into the affected area. Adjust opacity accordingly. Cheap and nasty but it can kind of work sometimes.

    This is just off the top of my head and as always, poorly explained. Please feel free to ask further questions for better explanation.
    Thanks Geoff!! Sounds pretty complicated to me haha but will try it out. My only nasty attempt so far was to use the lasso tool & fill it in (darken). It helped but i losed detail

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    Quote Originally Posted by Colin B View Post
    I must be geting old or maybe my glasses need updating because I can't see any "bright spot" on that rock apart from a few sparkly bits. If anything, I would use Photoshop's "enhance - adjust lighting- shadows/highlights" menu to get a little more light and detail into the darker areas.
    Cheers colin. Maybe bright spot isnt the best description, its not as dark as the rest of the rocks either side of it

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    Arch-Σigmoid Ausphotography Regular ameerat42's Avatar
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    I think you mean the (slightly) reddish area on the flat rock, approximately "just below" the bright patch of sky
    where the sun is hiding. If so, then I'd:
    1) Personally, leave it, as it looks natural, or (for me Photoshop) judiciously...
    2) Use the Shadows brush to deepen the shadows and then the Highlights brush to lighten them again, then...
    3) Use the Brush tool for (suitably selected nearby) Color(s).
    CC, Image editing OK.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ameerat42 View Post
    I think you mean the (slightly) reddish area on the flat rock, approximately "just below" the bright patch of sky
    where the sun is hiding. If so, then I'd:
    1) Personally, leave it, as it looks natural, or (for me Photoshop) judiciously...
    2) Use the Shadows brush to deepen the shadows and then the Highlights brush to lighten them again, then...
    3) Use the Brush tool for (suitably selected nearby) Color(s).
    Yes thats the spot, thanks for the tips

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    A royal pain in the bum! arthurking83's Avatar
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    Not the best job I've ever done, but here's a quick try:

    2D8A9365_01.jpg

    Easy top do with color control points.
    I think there's an add-on that you can get for Adobe software.
    Note, could have done better, but this is more for the show, rather than my editing skillz .. which aren't the best .. hence why I prefer to edit with software that only have color control point technology.

    But the method is easy: add a color control point at the centre of the affected area.
    Steps were to reduce Red(I think by 25%), reduce Green by about 10%, reduce Warmth by about 50%, I think I added a very small amount of Brightness(maybe 1-5%)
    What I should have also done was add a small amount of Blue, to try balance that residual warming/red look that remained.(only just thought of it as I'm typing this).

    Reason I like Color Control Points is that they automatically choose the mask based on colour(hence why Color in the name of the tool).

    I think you use Adobe software, so a similar method would be to create a mask surrounding the affected area, and use the colour channel editing tool to reduce the warmer colours(up to green) .. that is magenta, reds, yellows, oranges etc.
    Maybe add a bit of blur/cyan.
    I don't use Adobe software so I'm only assuming it'll work the same, but note that my use of software that has Color Control Point tools, makes this easy(even easy peasy! ).
    The hard part in using the colour channel tool in Adobe(and other software) will be to get the mask layer spot on without affecting other areas too much.

    You could try it using Nikon's CaptureNX-D which is free, and it works on raster images, or you could check out a colour control point plug in(I think DxO now has the rights for the add on).
    DxO also has their own raw editor software which also has CCP tools .. but costs a fair bit of $s.
    CaptureNX-D is one of those programs that seem be either like it or hate it(I'm actually indifferent to it .. hated it madly at first, but warming to it more and more as new versions come out).
    But it's free, and will work on jpg or tif files to get the job done. Reason for all this info is that it's so easy to do.
    On a larger version of the image, you could do a much better job of it .. probably even better again on a tif file version too.
    The hack I did took all of about two mins or so.
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    Quote Originally Posted by arthurking83 View Post
    Not the best job I've ever done, but here's a quick try:

    2D8A9365_01.jpg

    Easy top do with color control points.
    I think there's an add-on that you can get for Adobe software.
    Note, could have done better, but this is more for the show, rather than my editing skillz .. which aren't the best .. hence why I prefer to edit with software that only have color control point technology.

    But the method is easy: add a color control point at the centre of the affected area.
    Steps were to reduce Red(I think by 25%), reduce Green by about 10%, reduce Warmth by about 50%, I think I added a very small amount of Brightness(maybe 1-5%)
    What I should have also done was add a small amount of Blue, to try balance that residual warming/red look that remained.(only just thought of it as I'm typing this).

    Reason I like Color Control Points is that they automatically choose the mask based on colour(hence why Color in the name of the tool).

    I think you use Adobe software, so a similar method would be to create a mask surrounding the affected area, and use the colour channel editing tool to reduce the warmer colours(up to green) .. that is magenta, reds, yellows, oranges etc.
    Maybe add a bit of blur/cyan.
    I don't use Adobe software so I'm only assuming it'll work the same, but note that my use of software that has Color Control Point tools, makes this easy(even easy peasy! ).
    The hard part in using the colour channel tool in Adobe(and other software) will be to get the mask layer spot on without affecting other areas too much.

    You could try it using Nikon's CaptureNX-D which is free, and it works on raster images, or you could check out a colour control point plug in(I think DxO now has the rights for the add on).
    DxO also has their own raw editor software which also has CCP tools .. but costs a fair bit of $s.
    CaptureNX-D is one of those programs that seem be either like it or hate it(I'm actually indifferent to it .. hated it madly at first, but warming to it more and more as new versions come out).
    But it's free, and will work on jpg or tif files to get the job done. Reason for all this info is that it's so easy to do.
    On a larger version of the image, you could do a much better job of it .. probably even better again on a tif file version too.
    The hack I did took all of about two mins or so.
    That looks pretty good to me!
    Ill give it ago with adobe. So what color control software do you use?

  9. #9
    A royal pain in the bum! arthurking83's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesmartin View Post
    ....
    Ill give it ago with adobe. So what color control software do you use?
    Color Control Point .. or 'U-point' tech.

    See DxO's website for the plug in.
    As far as I remember it's quite expensive for the plugin, and I don't think many folks appreciate how well and easy it is to use.

    Like I said, it's an editing process that may be 'to taste' .. but once you've learned it, it's really the simplest way to spot edit.

    You can try DxO's free trial, and I think they have a plug in for Adobe, and their own raw editor program as well .. maybe about $200-ish all up for this Nik collection thingy .. not really sure.
    I got their DxO raw editor software .. works well, but still not as well (for me) as Nikon's own software.
    So I kind'a stopped using DxO's PhotoLab as Nikon's CaptureNX-D finally added the ability to use Color Control Point editing(they've had this editing process since about 2007 or so, and stopped it when they stopped supporting their old software).

    Anyhow, check out the link above to DxO and it kind'a shows you how it works.

    I'd post some screen shots, ro even a small how to video, but the issue is that the actual CCP editing tools don't show up in either a screen grab, or a video capture.

    Note tho, if you've never used this editing process, it can start off a little confusing, but once you've understood how it works(more importantly what it actually does!) .. and you need to do this type of spot editing regularly you'll end up wondering how you managed without it.
    There are some tips to using it fully effectively too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by arthurking83 View Post
    Color Control Point .. or 'U-point' tech.

    See DxO's website for the plug in.
    As far as I remember it's quite expensive for the plugin, and I don't think many folks appreciate how well and easy it is to use.

    Like I said, it's an editing process that may be 'to taste' .. but once you've learned it, it's really the simplest way to spot edit.

    You can try DxO's free trial, and I think they have a plug in for Adobe, and their own raw editor program as well .. maybe about $200-ish all up for this Nik collection thingy .. not really sure.
    I got their DxO raw editor software .. works well, but still not as well (for me) as Nikon's own software.
    So I kind'a stopped using DxO's PhotoLab as Nikon's CaptureNX-D finally added the ability to use Color Control Point editing(they've had this editing process since about 2007 or so, and stopped it when they stopped supporting their old software).

    Anyhow, check out the link above to DxO and it kind'a shows you how it works.

    I'd post some screen shots, ro even a small how to video, but the issue is that the actual CCP editing tools don't show up in either a screen grab, or a video capture.

    Note tho, if you've never used this editing process, it can start off a little confusing, but once you've understood how it works(more importantly what it actually does!) .. and you need to do this type of spot editing regularly you'll end up wondering how you managed without it.
    There are some tips to using it fully effectively too.
    Thanks Arthur!!

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