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Thread: SONY RX10 Mark III for shooting ball sports

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    Ausphotography Regular Phil777's Avatar
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    SONY RX10 Mark III for shooting ball sports

    I have been looking around for a camera that does more than my Canon 80D at 7fps so that I can get the ball closer to the foot/hands etc etc.
    7D Mk II does 10fps and Sony RX10 Mk III does 14fps (double the 80D) on focus lock on the first pic of the burst.
    If you take a burst of from 3 to 4 pics with the 80D you would get 6 to 8 pics to choose from with the RX10 Mk III.
    Does anyone have the Sony camera and use it for sports?
    Some of the reviews says it is not good at focus tracking on fast-moving sports.
    Thanks,
    Phil.
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    A royal pain in the bum! arthurking83's Avatar
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    1. I wouldn't want to be hamstrung with 'focus lock on first frame' with any camera!!

    2. faster frame advance rate isn't the only way to get images you want.
    (obviously it helps, but there's more too it than simply faster frame rates)
    And the fastest frame rate is only available in jpg shooting mode. it's only 5fps if you prefer to shoot raw mode.

    3. what you may gain in frame rates, you're probably going to lose in real ISO quality with the RX10.
    Basically, sounds like you're shooting sports. I haven't used the Sony, but looking at the DPR review it's clear that it's focusing is not it's forte ... not at DSLR level.

    While the f/4 aperture sounds fast, it should be taken into context tho.
    The size of the sensor plays a role in the (effective) speed of an aperture. Small sensor = less light gathering ability = higher ISO by way of comparison = more noise!

    It's easy for us onlookers to recommend something like the the 7D MkII over the Sony, and to get yourself a 150-600mm soom lens to go with that too .. but of course all that costs money.
    The Sony is the cheaper option by comparison.
    But it's important to note the limitations you'll inevitably encounter in trying something like the Sony for shooting sports.


    BTW!! .. DPR gave it a thumbs(or not recommended) down for peak action/sports shooting.

    I think the trick is to learn(or teach yourself) the disciple of shooting the particular type of sports you want to do here. Learn to anticipate the action, and where the ball is going to be at any given 0.07s
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    Ausphotography Regular bitsnpieces's Avatar
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    The RX10III is capable, but as Arthur already pointed out, it isn't recommended for fast shooting. Although it does have the 14fps, it doesn't track well. There are people who have used it for such work nonetheless, but do expect to have some misses.

    If you really need something and budget is a concern, the Panasonic FZ1000 does a much better job at tracking than any of the current RX10 cameras, as it uses a really good focus tracking algorithm to get the results. But will still have a few misses here and there, nevertheless, cheaper, zoom up to 400mm which isn't too bad, but the main point is better tracking.

    Still can't compete with DSLRs nevertheless.

    A possibility would be the a6000 series, and a telephoto lens, like the 55-210, or something. Because of the 1.5x crop factor, you're basically getting 315mm. Still not the reach of the other two, but you'll get autofocus.

    If you have the budget, the sony a9 or a99ii are a couple of options.
    The new a9 with the 70-300, or the a99ii with the 70-400mm. I believe they can shoot in crop mode also, can't remember. If so, that's a9 with 450mm (not quite 600mm) or a99ii with 600mm (what you're looking for).
    What's great about the a99ii is that it's a very good all round camera for video, landscape, sports, portrait, wedding, etc - Jack of all trades, master of none.

    I'm personally waiting for the RX10iv (if it ever comes out) I don't need the crazy zoom (though it'd be nice), but just need f/2.8 all the way, with the phase detection they implemented for the RX100v, plus more.
    Last edited by bitsnpieces; 30-06-2017 at 11:30pm.
    David Tran

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    Bought one of these cams recently and really enjoying it.

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    Thanks guys for your helpful info which has given me a lot to think about.
    Also recently announced and nearly out now is the new Sony RX10 IV with 315 phase-detection AF points which cover 65% of the frame plus 24fps in continuous focus giving a really good upgrade but at a hefty price of around $2,500 AU. You can buy a Canon 80D with APS-C sensor plus a Sigma 150-600 for just over $2,000 AU but back to the 7 fps for sports and wildlife.

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    I think the trick is to learn(or teach yourself) the disciple of shooting the particular type of sports you want to do here. Learn to anticipate the action, and where the ball is going to be at any given 0.07s
    There is some good technical advice given in this thread but the above costs the least. Depending what your sport is, what you see in the view is usually to late to capture. Timing is everything.
    Filter


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