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Thread: What lens should I be looking at

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    Member Salma's Avatar
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    What lens should I be looking at

    Hi there everyone!

    So basically I have a Nikon D3000 and I am looking to get a lens; I am going for the more affordable end, so either a sigma, tamron or Tokina lens.
    I currently have the standard 18-55mm lens, however since I have become interested in birds I need to upgrade...
    I am just a beginner, so I'm basically just looking for a lens that will allow me to take some decent pictures of bird from a decent kinda distance.
    What lens would you suggest?

    Thank you!
    Last edited by Salma; 02-05-2016 at 9:39pm.

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    Ausphotography Regular J.davis's Avatar
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    Sigma 150-600 C or Tamron 150-600 will get you there for a grand or so. Please change your text or background, cant really see black on dark grey.
    Regards
    John
    Nikon D750, Sigma 105mm OS Macro, Tokina 16-28 F2.8, Sigma 24-105 Art, Sigma 150-600C,
    Benro Tripod and Monopod with Arca plates

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    Quote Originally Posted by J.davis View Post
    Sigma 150-600 C or Tamron 150-600 will get you there for a grand or so. Please change your text or background, cant really see black on dark grey.
    Thanks for your suggestion and done!

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    Arch-Σigmoid Ausphotography Regular ameerat42's Avatar
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    Your camera relies on phase detection for AF (Auto Focus). It may want to falter in low-light conditions.
    The max f-stop on these lenses is f/6.3, and on zooming, they depart quickly from this. So in dim light,
    such as in trees on even sunny days, be prepared for some hunting in the AF. Upping the ISO value will
    not really help the AF.

    Apart from that, either lens should serve you well. A few people have them here on AP.

    If the birding bug really bites - and you are financial enough - you may find yourself looking for a later
    camera.

    Edited in: Just to make a point, both lenses have pretty good image stabilisation. Don't go for a "cheaper,
    2nd-hand, non-stabilised lens".

    BTW. Just use the default text color.
    Last edited by ameerat42; 02-05-2016 at 9:54pm.
    CC, Image editing OK.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ameerat42 View Post
    Your camera relies on phase detection for AF (Auto Focus). It may want to falter in low-light conditions.
    The max f-stop on these lenses is f/6.3, and on zooming, they depart quickly from this. So in dim light,
    such as in trees on even sunny days, be prepared for some hunting in the AF. Upping the ISO value will
    not really help the AF.

    Apart from that, either lens should serve you well. A few people have them here on AP.

    If the birding bug really bites - and you are financial enough - you may find yourself looking for a later
    camera.

    Edited in: Just to make a point, both lenses have pretty good image stabilisation. Don't go for a "cheaper,
    2nd-hand, non-stabilised lens".

    BTW. Just use the default text color.
    Thank you for that!

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    Ausphotography Regular John King's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salma View Post
    Hi there everyone!

    So basically I have a Nikon D3000 and I am looking to get a lens; I am going for the more affordable end, so either a sigma, tamron or Tokina lens.
    I currently have the standard 18-55mm lens, however since I have become interested in birds I need to upgrade...
    I am just a beginner, so I'm basically just looking for a lens that will allow me to take some decent pictures of bird from a decent kinda distance.
    What lens would you suggest?

    Thank you! http://www.photoforum.com.au/images/...0309_smile.gif
    Gidday Salma

    One of the very best bird photographers I know uses manual focus exclusively ... . There are some fabulous MF lenses available ...
    Regards, john

    Galleries: http://canopuscomputing.com.au/gallery2/v/main-page/


    My galleries contain all sorts of stuff, not just some pretty pictures.

    ILCs: E-M1 MkII; E-M1; E-30; E-510; E-1
    Digital lenses: 14-42 EZ; 12-50 macro; f/4 12-100 Pro; 40-150R; f/2.8 25 pancake; f/2 50 macro; f/4 7~14; 11~22; 14~42; 14~45; 14~54 MkII; 40~150 MkI; 40~150 MkII; 50~200 MkI; EX-25; EC-14


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    Arch-Σigmoid Ausphotography Regular ameerat42's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John King View Post
    ...There are some fabulous MF lenses available ...
    for you to consider if you ever become...
    Quote Originally Posted by John King View Post
    ...One of the very best bird photographers...

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    Quote Originally Posted by John King View Post
    Gidday Salma

    One of the very best bird photographers I know uses manual focus exclusively ... . There are some fabulous MF lenses available ...
    Hi John! Awesome, Is there a specific one you could recommend?

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    Ausphotography Regular John King's Avatar
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    ^ not really, Sal.

    I've used Olympus gear (mostly) for the last 40+ years ...

    Nikon have made some superb lenses over the years, but I'm no expert on them. The really good lenses still cost a lot - e.g. the MF Olympus f/2.8 350 mm still sells for about US $2,000+.

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    Member spootz01's Avatar
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    I cant speak for the Sigma 150-600 but the Tamron is fantastic, on canon anyway. But as mentions somewhere above, it will struggle in low light due to the maximum f6.3 aperture which kicks in at around 400mm. Also, I use the lens for sports so I can't be of any use when it comes to birding but you might be able to get away with slightly slower shutter speeds with still subjects.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Current Gear:
    Canon 600D | Sigma 18-250mm f3.5-6.3 | Canon 50mm f1.8 II | Tamron 150-600m f5-6.3 | Manfrotto 680B Monopod
    All kept in: Lowepro Protactic 350AW

    The GAS never ends.
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    Ausphotography irregular Mark L's Avatar
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    So you mentioned price and I understand that. You may loose interest in birds and ,well, buy a good lens 2nd hand and you can sell it later if needs be.
    Will the lens mentioned above are good you can get the Sigma 120-400 cheaper. Gives wider aperture for those light problems as you learn. It's done a really good job for me as I've learned about this birding caper. Am starting to want better but it's not really worth the money. Intend to upgrade the camera first.
    You won't be disappointed with the 120-400. Just be prepared to get used to a bit of weight of any of the lenses mentioned here (you do get used to said weight).
    "Enjoy what you can do rather than being frustrated at what you can't." bobt
    Canon 80D, 60D, Canon 28-105, Sigma 150-600S.

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    A royal pain in the bum! arthurking83's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John King View Post
    Gidday Salma

    One of the very best bird photographers I know uses manual focus exclusively ... ....
    On a personal note(ie. from experience) .. I'd highly recommend against this course of action.

    note: I'm not recommending against manual focus, or manual focus lenses!!
    I'm recommending not to go down this course taking into consideration the OP's circumstances.

    Why: The camera in use. D3000 is a good camera, and can be capable of good images.
    But, unfortunately it uses a fairly low spec pentamirror viewfinder which simply doesn't cut it for accurate manual focusing when averaged out.
    Yes, of course you can manually focus using a D3000, but if you averaged out the number of shots in focus and out of focus using manual focus, I'll bet that the majority will be not quite in focus.

    You can fix this situation, but to be honest it's not really worth the effort.

    For more accurate focusing using manual focus, I'd strongly recommend a camera with a pentaprism, and then modified with a more accurate focusing matte screen as well.
    As a minimum camera(in Nikon term) this means any camera at the D80 and above level(ie. D90, D7000/7100/72000 and higher in terms of specifications)

    I'd also recommend the Tammy 150-600 or Sigma 150-600 (C version) lenses too.
    If the budget can stretch to a few hundred more, then the Nikon 200-500VR lens is also highly recommended.

    Like Am said, the f/6.3 aperture at the long end of the Tammy and Sigma lenses range could be an issue on a D3000. The focusing system in a D3000 is a bit old now and could be a factor in some light conditions. That's not to say that it will be an issue .. only that it could be an issue.
    The f/5.6 aperture of the Nikon version is something that shouldn't be tho.
    That is, the D3000 is 'guaranteed' to operate with AF at f/5.6, but this isn't a given either. The light levels will determine the point where AF ceases to work consistently.

    If it were my camera and my money: I'd choose the Sigma 150-600 C considering the points made by the OP.
    Nikon D800E, D300, D70s
    {Nikon} -> 50/1.2 : 500/8(CPU'd) : 105/2.8VR Micro : 180/2.8ais : 105mm f/1.8ais : 24mm/2ais
    {Sigma}; ->10-20/4-5.6 : 50/1.4 : 12-24/4.5-5.6II : 150-600mm|S
    {Tamron}; -> 17-50/2.8 : 28-75/2.8 : 70-200/2.8 : 300/2.8 SP MF : 24-70/2.8VC


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    Quote Originally Posted by John King View Post
    ^ not really, Sal.

    I've used Olympus gear (mostly) for the last 40+ years ...

    Nikon have made some superb lenses over the years, but I'm no expert on them. The really good lenses still cost a lot - e.g. the MF Olympus f/2.8 350 mm still sells for about US $2,000+.
    Ok wow way over my budget lol.

    Quote Originally Posted by spootz01 View Post
    I cant speak for the Sigma 150-600 but the Tamron is fantastic, on canon anyway. But as mentions somewhere above, it will struggle in low light due to the maximum f6.3 aperture which kicks in at around 400mm. Also, I use the lens for sports so I can't be of any use when it comes to birding but you might be able to get away with slightly slower shutter speeds with still subjects.
    Thank you for that

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark L View Post
    So you mentioned price and I understand that. You may loose interest in birds and ,well, buy a good lens 2nd hand and you can sell it later if needs be.
    Will the lens mentioned above are good you can get the Sigma 120-400 cheaper. Gives wider aperture for those light problems as you learn. It's done a really good job for me as I've learned about this birding caper. Am starting to want better but it's not really worth the money. Intend to upgrade the camera first.
    You won't be disappointed with the 120-400. Just be prepared to get used to a bit of weight of any of the lenses mentioned here (you do get used to said weight).
    Thanks for your suggestion, I'll check up on that.
    I actually went on another forum, where everyone recommended a bridging camera, I really love the idea, but either way I sill want to upgrade my lens.



    Quote Originally Posted by arthurking83 View Post
    On a personal note(ie. from experience) .. I'd highly recommend against this course of action.

    note: I'm not recommending against manual focus, or manual focus lenses!!
    I'm recommending not to go down this course taking into consideration the OP's circumstances.

    Why: The camera in use. D3000 is a good camera, and can be capable of good images.
    But, unfortunately it uses a fairly low spec pentamirror viewfinder which simply doesn't cut it for accurate manual focusing when averaged out.
    Yes, of course you can manually focus using a D3000, but if you averaged out the number of shots in focus and out of focus using manual focus, I'll bet that the majority will be not quite in focus.

    You can fix this situation, but to be honest it's not really worth the effort.

    For more accurate focusing using manual focus, I'd strongly recommend a camera with a pentaprism, and then modified with a more accurate focusing matte screen as well.
    As a minimum camera(in Nikon term) this means any camera at the D80 and above level(ie. D90, D7000/7100/72000 and higher in terms of specifications)

    I'd also recommend the Tammy 150-600 or Sigma 150-600 (C version) lenses too.
    If the budget can stretch to a few hundred more, then the Nikon 200-500VR lens is also highly recommended.

    Like Am said, the f/6.3 aperture at the long end of the Tammy and Sigma lenses range could be an issue on a D3000. The focusing system in a D3000 is a bit old now and could be a factor in some light conditions. That's not to say that it will be an issue .. only that it could be an issue.
    The f/5.6 aperture of the Nikon version is something that shouldn't be tho.
    That is, the D3000 is 'guaranteed' to operate with AF at f/5.6, but this isn't a given either. The light levels will determine the point where AF ceases to work consistently.

    If it were my camera and my money: I'd choose the Sigma 150-600 C considering the points made by the OP.
    Ah understood! Thanks for that.

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