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Thread: RF 603 Voltage

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    Ausphotography Regular wideangle's Avatar
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    RF 603 Voltage

    I am looking at getting the YoungNuo 603 reciever/transmitter combo for use on a Canon 7D and 580EXm2, I know these cheap units are popular, but does anyone know what their voltage is, as I don't fancy blowing a camera or flash up. What's the risk associated with trigger/reciever voltages to the camera and flash? Would a high voltage reciever/transmitter kill a camera and flash or only a flash?
    Last edited by wideangle; 05-04-2014 at 1:56pm.
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    A royal pain in the bum! arthurking83's Avatar
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    If you get the Canon version of this device, I'm sure the hardware specs should be compatible with all your Canon devices(flashes and cameras).

    I wouldn't worry about the actual specs.
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    Quote Originally Posted by arthurking83 View Post
    If you get the Canon version of this device, I'm sure the hardware specs should be compatible with all your Canon devices(flashes and cameras).

    I wouldn't worry about the actual specs.
    I just didnt want to fry anything, don't fancy spending $$ on new gear, better safe than sorry.

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    Moderately Underexposed I @ M's Avatar
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    Mr. Google says that the RF603 transmitters use 2 x 1.5 volt batteries.

    Don't buy the 603 units unless they are 603 ll units.
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    Quote Originally Posted by I @ M View Post
    Mr. Google says that the RF603 transmitters use 2 x 1.5 volt batteries.

    Don't buy the 603 units unless they are 603 ll units.
    So assuming 1.5v is fine? Why do you say get the version 2 units? Is that because of the on/off switch being in a better position as well as being able to lock it into place, or something else over the version 1?

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    Moderately Underexposed I @ M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wideangle View Post
    So assuming 1.5v is fine?
    I don't see why the voltage in a trigger would be a worry at such a low level, speedlights contain much higher voltages in their capacitors and older off brand units have been known to fry modern cameras through synch cords. Plugging a camera into a pc via the usb connection would worry me more than a low voltage trigger and usb power is only around the 5V mark from memory.

    Quote Originally Posted by wideangle View Post
    Why do you say get the version 2 units? Is that because of the on/off switch being in a better position as well as being able to lock it into place, or something else over the version 1?
    The improvements seem to be in a higher synch speed and a locking ring to keep them on the camera better.
    As a "dumb" trigger at a low price they will work quite well, I have a set of 602 triggers and receivers that show no sign of quitting after quite few years of heavy use but if I were looking these days as you are I think that I would rather spend a little more up front on some Phottix TTL capable triggers. They will give you good TTL use if you want it and manual control when you don't need TTL.

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    Quote Originally Posted by I @ M View Post
    I don't see why the voltage in a trigger would be a worry at such a low level, speedlights contain much higher voltages in their capacitors and older off brand units have been known to fry modern cameras through synch cords. Plugging a camera into a pc via the usb connection would worry me more than a low voltage trigger and usb power is only around the 5V mark from memory.



    The improvements seem to be in a higher synch speed and a locking ring to keep them on the camera better.
    As a "dumb" trigger at a low price they will work quite well, I have a set of 602 triggers and receivers that show no sign of quitting after quite few years of heavy use but if I were looking these days as you are I think that I would rather spend a little more up front on some Phottix TTL capable triggers. They will give you good TTL use if you want it and manual control when you don't need TTL.

    Thanks for your help. So its the high voltage from triggers that would possibly fry cameras/flashes, but it would have to be a lot higher voltage than a couple of volts to kill it.....I have no idea about this voltage stuff!

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    Moderately Underexposed I @ M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wideangle View Post
    Thanks for your help. So its the high voltage from triggers that would possibly fry cameras/flashes, but it would have to be a lot higher voltage than a couple of volts to kill it.....I have no idea about this voltage stuff!
    The trigger is probably the least likely part of the chain to give any problems. It runs at lower voltages than your camera or flash unit.

    Basically, you don't want voltages going from one component to another that are higher than all the parts are designed to withstand. Your flash is engineered to work with the camera. Both the camera and flash units run higher voltages than the trigger so there should be no problems there.
    I assume that you are buying the triggers to use the flash of the camera so there fore in the event that flash voltage tries to leak back through the receiver and damage anything it can't actually get to the camera anyway. The actual trigger on the camera is still well below the voltage that you camera operates at and should not present any problems.

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    Quote Originally Posted by I @ M View Post
    The trigger is probably the least likely part of the chain to give any problems. It runs at lower voltages than your camera or flash unit.

    Basically, you don't want voltages going from one component to another that are higher than all the parts are designed to withstand. Your flash is engineered to work with the camera. Both the camera and flash units run higher voltages than the trigger so there should be no problems there.
    I assume that you are buying the triggers to use the flash of the camera so there fore in the event that flash voltage tries to leak back through the receiver and damage anything it can't actually get to the camera anyway. The actual trigger on the camera is still well below the voltage that you camera operates at and should not present any problems.
    I plan to be using the external flashes off camera on stands, with recievers/transmitters - both on the flash and one on the camera hot shoe. Thanks for your help.

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    Quote Originally Posted by I @ M View Post
    The trigger is probably the least likely part of the chain to give any problems. It runs at lower voltages than your camera or flash unit.

    Basically, you don't want voltages going from one component to another that are higher than all the parts are designed to withstand. Your flash is engineered to work with the camera. Both the camera and flash units run higher voltages than the trigger so there should be no problems there.
    I assume that you are buying the triggers to use the flash of the camera so there fore in the event that flash voltage tries to leak back through the receiver and damage anything it can't actually get to the camera anyway. The actual trigger on the camera is still well below the voltage that you camera operates at and should not present any problems.
    OK so it sounds like there is more risk associted with voltage from the external flashgun itself rather than the triggers/recievers.

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    I have the rf-603 II triggers and they work very well with my manual flash. If I had a nice TTL flash I would be thinking about ttl triggers but I guess this depends how you will use them. Better to buy once than twice.

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