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Thread: Photo-documenting the construction of a house

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    Photo-documenting the construction of a house

    Hi folks,

    A work colleague is building a house and approached me this morning about documenting the build for them. She knows of my continuing interest in photography, has seen some of my pictures here and I've done some work photography for her as well (group gatherings and events).

    Now she's asked if I'll help her and her husband document the build of their house. I'm initially quite keen; it's a long term project with a distinct beginning and end. However, without the chance to go back a reshoot something (for example, you only lay the pad once!) I'm looking for pointers, advice, hints, tips, do's and don't and anything else the collective experience the users of this site can offer.

    It's important to me, very important to them and I can't begin to think I know everything about this.

    Thanks everyone,

    Bill
    Hi! I'm Bill.

    Constructive critique on photos and suggestions and tips for editing is most welcome.
    Nikon D5100, D7000, Nikon 35mm, Nikon 50mm, Sigma 10-20mm, Sigma 17-50mm, Nikon 18-135mm, Nikon 18-200mm, Nikon 55-300mm, Tamron 70-300mm
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  2. #2
    Ausphotography irregular Mark L's Avatar
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    Pick a pleasing view/angle of the block they are building on. Take a photo of the empty land and then as each stage progresses, take a photo from the same place. From nothing to something.
    Just a thought. Doesn't help with the closer stuff though.

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    Fishy bricat's Avatar
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    Put your own little "surveyor" mark (nail in concrete)at the front of the block to set your camera on then take a photo at the same time everyday. This time last year I did a complete interior reno for my son and whilst I did take a lot of photo's I did miss a lot of shots as I did not have a structured approach to the taking of photographs. If you are not onsite daily you may miss "important" shots. And I was there everyday. Big big big job. Make sure both parties understand how often you are going to take shots. Good luck. cheers Brian
    Cheers Brian.

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    Ausphotography Regular
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    Some really good advice here. Maybe also consider shooting some video (if you can) of the more major milestones.

  5. #5
    Photo Bizarro nimrodisease's Avatar
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    I'm actually currently in the process of doing this, as my parents are building a home. I haven't told them that I'm doing this, but I've been going out once or twice a week (I would love to more often but it's just too far to drive) and taking a photo from the same place. At the end I intend to align them as best I can and make a short timelapse of the construction.

    As has already been said, you should find a spot where you can easily create exactly the same composition time and time again. In my particular case, there happens to be a 'no stopping' sign just outside the house and I found that if I stand next to the pole and lean my shoulder against it, then I am standing in exactly the same position every time. I have my lens set to the widest angle (11mm) so that it's the same every time, and I have some markers in the frame (power pole, letterbox, etc) that I try to line up as best I can. Every shot so far has been f/8, ISO 200, exposure time varying depending on the weather etc.

    One thing I regret though is not starting sooner! Unfortunately when I took my first frame the construction fence was already up around the old house which was to be demolished.
    My name is John.
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    Cheers everyone, some great advice here that's helped support and add to my initial plans.

    Went out yesterday and photographed from 4 vantage points; from which two are really good. I've noted the time of day, camera settings (ISO, f/stop, exposure setting, WB, and lens (14 and 20mm) and have the same location options as John for consistency: A fence line to lean against and the overhead balcony of an adjacent apartment building for a downward angle.

    I've spoken with the family to set up a routine timeline for pictures, with allowances for major events and created a new folder in which I'll store their pictures.

    If you can think of anything else for me to know/consider or do feel free to let me know. :-)

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    Arch-Σigmoid Ausphotography Regular ameerat42's Avatar
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    ^As Mark and Bricat specified, and make sure you use the same lens. But also take pictures of details, maybe candids,... and so on.
    It sounds like an interesting project. At the end you might be able to make a sort of animation.
    Am.
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