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Thread: Mounting camera in portrait position on a tripod

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    Member AllanKidd's Avatar
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    Mounting camera in portrait position on a tripod

    I am looking to take photos to be stitched together as a panorama.
    What equipment should I buy to enable the mounting of a Nikon D90 in portrait orientation onto a tripod?
    Ideally there is something I can use with my existing tripod.

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    Moderately Underexposed I @ M's Avatar
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    Dedicated products exist made by a few companies.
    The first that springs to mind is this one ---- http://www.nodalninja.com/ ---- and they are pretty precise mounts to make sure that the sensor plane is directly over the point of rotation.

    Other than those type of mounts, if your tripod head has an arca swiss compatible plate then a simple "L" bracket such as this one --- http://www.hejnarphotostore.com/inde...roducts_id=204 ---- will hold things in place.
    Andrew
    Nikon, Fuji, Nikkor, Sigma, Tamron, Tokina and too many other bits and pieces to list.



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    Ausphotography Regular junqbox's Avatar
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    As above, re L Plate. I have attached a 'Arca Swiss' style QR plate to a Manfrotto QR so I can use an L Plate set-up on a Manfrtto tripod. Works great, although it does add a small amount of additional weight.

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    Ausphotography Regular Boo53's Avatar
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    I've just ordered this one http://www.ebay.com/itm/Kingjue-KH-6...E:L:OC:AU:3160 hasn't arrived yet but looks promising.

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    Hmmm - what am I missing? See the following link for $28.68 oz dollars?
    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/281099924...84.m1438.l2649

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    Administrator ricktas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AllanKidd View Post
    Hmmm - what am I missing? See the following link for $28.68 oz dollars?
    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/281099924...84.m1438.l2649
    Build quality, Metal vs plastic (plastic in the ebay one). You could be supporting $000s' in equipment on this bracket, would you prefer a solid metal one or a plastic one? I know which I would stick $5K of gear on.
    "It is one thing to make a picture of what a person looks like, it is another thing to make a portrait of who they are" - Paul Caponigro

    Constructive Critique of my photographs is always appreciated
    Nikon, etc!

    RICK
    My Photography

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    Moderately Underexposed I @ M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AllanKidd View Post
    Hmmm - what am I missing? See the following link for $28.68 oz dollars?
    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/281099924...84.m1438.l2649
    If you have a look at their "shop" you will find that the same plate is probably one that they list for Canon cameras. Even by their own description, the D80 plate fits a few other models as well meaning that it is a "universal" plate. It may not matter to some people but I prefer a plate that is specifically made for the one body because you are then generally assured that the adequate research has gone into the design to allow you to perform simple tasks like replacing the camera battery, memory card/s and side port connections whilst the plate is in place instead of removing it every time that you want to change something.

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    Member Babu's Avatar
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    I'm in absolute agreement with Rick.
    I know there some pretty fancy plastics out there but it would take a lot of convincing that a plastic mounting system could be as dependable as the Arca Swiss clamps and RRS L brackets I've used on my Gitzo tripods and monopods for several years.
    The L brackets are milled aluminium and have performed well in many environments (rain-forests, snow zones, studios...).
    They add very little weight and I leave one permanently fitted to each of my four camera bodies which are also gripped.
    If you do use a battery grip, you need to acquire an L bracket to suit so take care to order the right one - they are body specific.
    You should also check out pano brackets.

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    Ausphotography Regular junqbox's Avatar
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    absolutely, my stuff is all metal. wouldn't even consider an option made of plastic, let alone that is fairly generic in design, as opposed to made for your camera. check out both Kirk and RRS, you won't be disappointed.
    If you insist on going with the plastic, then at least insure your gear for when you need to replace it.

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    A royal pain in the bum! arthurking83's Avatar
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    The one in the ebay link is stated as aluminium alloy .. and while this may sound great(or comparable) to the high end stuff .. alloys are definitely not alloys in the Chinese manufactured goods industry.

    Where the more expensive stuff is generally a super touch alloy, you can bet your last $28.68 that this one may be a painted(not anodized) plain cheapo alloy, not the aircraft quality(usually stated as T6063 alloy) stuff.

    (usually)Hejnar has the best value for money gear for the higher end stuff.
    Nikon D800E, D300, D70s
    {Nikon} -> 50/1.2 : 500/8(CPU'd) : 105/2.8VR Micro : 180/2.8ais : 105mm f/1.8ais : 24mm/2ais
    {Sigma}; ->10-20/4-5.6 : 50/1.4 : 12-24/4.5-5.6II : 150-600mm|S
    {Tamron}; -> 17-50/2.8 : 28-75/2.8 : 70-200/2.8 : 300/2.8 SP MF : 24-70/2.8VC


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    Ausphotography Regular J.davis's Avatar
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    Generally the material its made of is insignificant ( most planes are plastic these days) , but design is of utmost importance.
    The better build quality brackets are one piece and designed for the particular camera, the one you are looking at is two pieces held together with bolts, this can lead to misalignment and wear over time.
    Regards
    John
    Nikon D750, Sigma 105mm OS Macro, Tokina 16-28 F2.8, Sigma 24-105 Art, Sigma 150-600C,
    Benro Tripod and Monopod with Arca plates

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    I would definatly spen a bit more with less chance of failure resulting in a damaged camera and more chance the equipment will last longer. Especialy when that equipment is supporting expensive camera and lenses

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    Moderately Underexposed I @ M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.davis View Post
    Generally the material its made of is insignificant ( most planes are plastic these days) , but design is of utmost importance.
    The better build quality brackets are one piece and designed for the particular camera, the one you are looking at is two pieces held together with bolts, this can lead to misalignment and wear over time.
    I definitely wouldn't be worried about a quality bracket made as a 2 piece unit John. The Hejnar brackets are joined with one bolt and 2 well fitting dowels and I reckon the chances of ever seeing any wear and movement in those brackets over the lifetime of the camera is zero.
    I would even go so far as to say that the 2 piece design is a better solution than a one piece as it allows for the camera to be used on the base plate alone for a little less bulk if needed.
    Last edited by I @ M; 17-02-2014 at 12:30pm.

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    A royal pain in the bum! arthurking83's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by I @ M View Post
    .....
    I would even go so far as to say that the 2 piece design is a better solution ....
    +1
    As long as it's from a reputable source.

    I have two and both feel as solid as the one piece unit I also have(Markins).

    The other bonus about the Hejnar L brackets is that the side bracket being removable is also updatable!
    So if you originally got one for your plain old non gripped camera, and decided to get a grip for this camera, it doesn't cost $200 for a new L bracket .. it only cost about $40 for a new side bracket

    I do like Andrew described on the whole, and leave the L-bracket un L'ed and use only the base plate. It's a 30sec task to mount the L bracket if needed and takes up barely any room in the bag.

    The only issue with this Hejnar design is that the side bracket(or entire bracket) need to be removed to remove the battery out of the grip.

    On the whole John is probably right in that the material used in the a bracket may be less significant .. but this would really only apply to the base plate type brackets.
    An L bracket is subjected to more force in some situations, and the quality of the material as well as the design is going to have an impact on both the performance(rigidity) and longevity.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Boo53 View Post
    I've just ordered this one http://www.ebay.com/itm/Kingjue-KH-6...E:L:OC:AU:3160 hasn't arrived yet but looks promising.
    Please let me know what you think of it when it arrives - it looks exactly what I should have.

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    Ausphotography Regular Boo53's Avatar
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    It arrived yesterday and I've had a little play around.

    Looks very solid and all the connections are quite rigid. I'm quite happy with it and I have no concerns about mounting heavy camera gear on it.

    Connects easily to the arca swiss head on my tripod

    We're heading off for a weeks holiday in Gippsland so I hope to have a good play

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    Quote Originally Posted by Boo53 View Post
    It arrived yesterday and I've had a little play around.

    Looks very solid and all the connections are quite rigid. I'm quite happy with it and I have no concerns about mounting heavy camera gear on it.
    OK - mine has now arrived and am happy with the quality.

    I now have a different issue to resolve - the bottom of the Nikon D90 has one screw hole to enable the camera to be attached to the L plate. This means the camera can rotate on the attaching screw. Apart from severe tightening of this one threaded screw, is there any other way to keep the camera stable - particularly in portrait orientation?

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Boo53 View Post
    It arrived yesterday and I've had a little play around.

    Looks very solid and all the connections are quite rigid. I'm quite happy with it and I have no concerns about mounting heavy camera gear on it.
    OK - mine has now arrived and am happy with the quality.

    I now have a different issue to resolve - the bottom of the Nikon D90 has one screw hole to enable the camera to be attached to the L plate. This means the camera can rotate on the attaching screw. Apart from severe tightening of this one threaded screw, is there any other way to keep the camera stable - particularly in portrait orientation?

  18. #18
    Still in the Circle of Confusion Cage's Avatar
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    And this is where the quality of a well engineered plate comes to the fore.

    I wouldn't entertain the idea of a camera mount plate unless it had a non-twist lip on it and was designed specifically for the camera model.
    Cheers
    Kev

    D800 & GAS

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    Ausphotography Regular Boo53's Avatar
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    I use arca-swiss plates on my bodies that do up tightly with the single screw, and have heavy dutu rubber bonded to the plate to stop it slipping.

    Mine are actually part of the Peak designs clamp system - https://peakdesignltd.com/store/?c=clips

    Nice and snug, but I do check regularly.

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    A royal pain in the bum! arthurking83's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AllanKidd View Post
    OK - mine has now arrived and am happy with the quality.

    I now have a different issue to resolve - the bottom of the Nikon D90 has one screw hole to enable the camera to be attached to the L plate. This means the camera can rotate on the attaching screw. Apart from severe tightening of this one threaded screw, is there any other way to keep the camera stable - particularly in portrait orientation?

    ......
    In this instance I wouldn't be happy with the 'overall' quality of the accessory.

    But this isn't to say that the plate itself is to blame.

    Sometimes what can be at fault is the screw used to tighten the plate to the camera base.
    if the screw is too long, then what can happen is that it's tightens right up into the threads in the camera's base, but the plate doesn't clamp tightly onto the camera's rubber base . so of course the camera is loose(while the screw is fully tight!).

    Some options are:
    1. find another screw that you know will not 'bottom out' into the camera's threads with that base plate.
    2. possibly cut down some of the thread of the screw so it doesn't fully screw into the camera's threads.
    3. find a washer that will fit between the screw and plate(in effect makes the screw shorter, without the need to cut the threads, and possibly damage them(even tho they can be tapped to work properly again.
    4. find a material strong enough to fit between camera and plate, although this is the least likely to result in a fully tightened camera/plate connection.

    I've had this issue myself too, and the sole cause was simply the screws that came with the plates were just millimeters too long(even one mil, can do it!).

    I used the washer method to get me by until the shorter screws I ordered came along.

    The comment about anti twist plates is actually incorrect. A properly designed plate doesn't need these anti twist plate designs, and I've personally ground flat two of my (expensive!) plates so designed, so that they now fit on any camera I own. They don't twist on any of the cameras I own, even the lil cheapy P&S my daughter owns.

    A good plate will fit properly as long as the design is properly thought out.

    And if you think that those plates with rubberised bases are a good idea .. think again. While they initially work well, eventually they all suffer the same fate. Rubber becomes compressed to the point where it no longer works as it should.
    Manfrotto plates spring immediately to my mind on this topic, and how many rubber pads I've replaced over the years drives me mad with the thought that all that money spent would have been better spent on a 'proper plate'!! to begin with.

    Allan, if you have any way to measure the thread length of the screw with it fitted to the plate(so that the measurement is taken from the plate to the tip of the thread, I can try to help with info on whether it's too long for that application.

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