User Tag List

Thanks useful information Thanks useful information:  0
Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Shooting for large prints

  1. #1
    Member dashtech's Avatar
    Join Date
    02 Apr 2013
    Location
    Penrith
    Posts
    10
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Shooting for large prints

    Hi,

    Sorry if this has been covered but I have been searching and reading. I am wanting to take photos for use on large prints. Say for a vertical landscape something around the 700mmx900mm size on canvas. Possibly even large similar size prints on paper for framing.

    Camera I have is 600D and works fine for everything I want at the moment. Issue is I am not sure how to work with the images to create high detail prints.

    I always shoot RAW and for printing save as a .tif but what I am having trouble understanding is how big I can get a picture printed or what the work flow is for making the print ready for print.

    Would hate to send a photo away for a large print and it comes back crappy.

    If doing a landscape with the intention of large print, is this where I should be doing multiple exposures and stacking them to build the quality and data in the image?

    This is really an area I am struggling on, I am getting pictures that look great on my online displays but really want to start printing stuff.

    Hopefully this was posted in the right section.

    Thanks,

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    15 Jul 2010
    Location
    Forest Lake
    Posts
    1,948
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It comes back to DPI (Dots Per Inch)

    High quality prints are set at 300 dpi, and as you make your canvas larger, the DPI rating goes down. Prints down to 180 DPI can still be considered ok, particularly if you're printing on Canvas. The texture of the meduim helps to hide the lack of details.

    The standard resolution of a monitor is generally 72 DPI

    If doing a landscape with the intention of large print, is this where I should be doing multiple exposures and stacking them to build the quality and data in the image?
    What you describe here is HDR (High Dynamic Range) and will not improve the pixel density of your images.

    Taking multiple exposures and "stitching" them together in a panorama will increase the available Pixels and allow for higher a Higher DPI print.

    Hope that clears the mud a little?
    Greg Bartle,
    I have a Pentax and I'm not afraid to use it.
    Pentax K5
    Sigma 10-20 | Tamron 17-50 F:2.8 | Sigma 50 F:1.4 | Sigma 70-200 F:2.8 Plus a bunch of Ye Olde lenses


    Would you like to see more?
    http://flickr.com/photosbygreg

  3. #3
    Arch-Σigmoid Ausphotography Regular ameerat42's Avatar
    Join Date
    18 Sep 2009
    Location
    Nthn Sydney
    Posts
    16,804
    Mentioned
    21 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Greg. I think Dash... means taking identical exposures of the same scene and stacking them to achieve (some sort of) smoothing result, like you stack
    astronomical shots to eliminate noise.

    Now Dash... At some stage, consider printing on normal size paper just a small segment of your much larger image. Try a few different parts of the image, and see
    how they come out. If you come across a successful result, that would be what you print at the larger size.

    And now to your camera. It is an 18MP camera with a largish sensor, so it has the potential to do what you want. Download a picture and treat it normally in your
    raw developer. Save it to a "normal" jpeg and look to see what the dimensions of the final image are in centimetres/inches.

    And now to some PP. Have you got the means to resize and re-sample your images? Photoshop is the program I use.
    Let's say your standard image size from the camera is (about) 60 x 40 cm. The 1st thing you can try is a straight doubling of your image size WITHOUT
    re-sampling the image. Like Greg said, if you have a standard image size (say from Photoshop) of 180 pixels per inch, just double the image so that your
    pixel pitch reads 90 pixels per inch. In Photoshop, you DO NOT tick the Re-sample box to achieve this.

    A 2nd thing to try is to actually double the pixel pitch to 360 ppi. NOTE: you will get a very large file as a result. THink of doing some mild sharpening on the result and then...

    Well, try printing some segments of the two images on smaller paper.

    Am.
    (PS: No, it's not that easy)
    Last edited by ameerat42; 18-04-2013 at 12:54pm.
    CC, Image editing OK.

  4. #4
    Member
    Threadstarter
    dashtech's Avatar
    Join Date
    02 Apr 2013
    Location
    Penrith
    Posts
    10
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the replies,

    Yes like Ameerat said, multiple of the same scene.

    Should have mentioned, yeas I have Creative Suite CS5 and have been using PS for a few years. All my work has only ever been for web work and online content. So first time needing to print. Well wanting to print.

    Will have a play with a few things tonight and see how it turns out.

    Say I am getting a shot printed and want it on... 23"x15" (just an example) In PS I need to be setting the image to that size with the DPI of 300 (or whatever DPI is being used)

    Don't mean to sound a complete noob.

    Oh and the RAW processor used is Adobe Camera Raw.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    17 Sep 2008
    Location
    old bar
    Posts
    314
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I took the plunge and had a few 20 x 30 inch pictures printed for the office, i think they were $17.50 each so i was not to fussed if they worked or not.

    I set up a 20 x 30 inch 300dpi photoshop file, dragged my pic in and free transformed to fit the 20 x 30 area, saved and uploaded to the printer.

    They turned out great so much so the boss ordered some for her office. My pics were taken with a 40D so id say your newer 600D with be just as good.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    15 Jul 2010
    Location
    Forest Lake
    Posts
    1,948
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Greg. I think Dash... means taking identical exposures of the same scene and stacking them to achieve (some sort of) smoothing result, like you stack
    astronomical shots to eliminate noise.
    Forgive me if I'm wrong here, but:

    If you take identical exposures of the same scene and stack them, it's not going to increase the pixel density as all the pixels are the same size and should (in theory) overlap exactly as well. You're 18 meg shot will still be an 18 meg shot. It will just have more bits per pixel ie a larger file size with no real advantage since you can only have so many colours available within a colourspace.
    I suppose noise reduction will be evident for random noise, but any hot pixels will still be hot pixels.

    Where-as stitching a panorama will increase the physical number of pixels available. Your 18 meg shot can be taken to the level of gigapixels if you take enough shots. With the increased number of pixels, you can make the canvas size smaller and increase the DPI of your final print.

  7. #7
    Member
    Threadstarter
    dashtech's Avatar
    Join Date
    02 Apr 2013
    Location
    Penrith
    Posts
    10
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks nwhc, will be having a shot at some examples. I still have and love the 40D still comes out every now and then.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus79 View Post

    Where-as stitching a panorama will increase the physical number of pixels available. Your 18 meg shot can be taken to the level of gigapixels if you take enough shots. With the increased number of pixels, you can make the canvas size smaller and increase the DPI of your final print.

    So say where I would have framed up a single shot at say 15mm - you would say go in at a tighter focal length and shoot more shots to create a panorama as such of the original shot. Example if that was a 15mm focal length landscape orientation, you could in fact do say 5 shots at 50mm portrait orientation and stitch them? (those focal lengths are just examples)

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    15 Jul 2010
    Location
    Forest Lake
    Posts
    1,948
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    So say where I would have framed up a single shot at say 15mm - you would say go in at a tighter focal length and shoot more shots to create a panorama as such of the original shot. Example if that was a 15mm focal length landscape orientation, you could in fact do say 5 shots at 50mm portrait orientation and stitch them? (those focal lengths are just examples)
    That's exactly what I'm saying. Not that I recommend it on a day to day basis, but in theory that's how it works.
    Shooting like this can produce shots impossible on your 15 mm lens too. I'm yet to come across a 15 mm 1.4 lens yet. but you can get 15mm worth of coverage at F:1.4 by using your 50 mm lens and stiching the results. Only really works well on a static scene though.

  9. #9
    Arch-Σigmoid Ausphotography Regular ameerat42's Avatar
    Join Date
    18 Sep 2009
    Location
    Nthn Sydney
    Posts
    16,804
    Mentioned
    21 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus79 View Post
    Forgive me if I'm wrong here, but:

    If you take identical exposures of the same scene and stack them...
    I tend to agree, but I was just trying to get a handle on what the OP meant.
    Am.

  10. #10
    Member
    Threadstarter
    dashtech's Avatar
    Join Date
    02 Apr 2013
    Location
    Penrith
    Posts
    10
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus79 View Post
    That's exactly what I'm saying. Not that I recommend it on a day to day basis, but in theory that's how it works.
    Shooting like this can produce shots impossible on your 15 mm lens too. I'm yet to come across a 15 mm 1.4 lens yet. but you can get 15mm worth of coverage at F:1.4 by using your 50 mm lens and stiching the results. Only really works well on a static scene though.
    Thanks.

    Those focal lengths were purely examples. My main lens for landscape work is my 10-24mm. Was using 50mm as an example of zooming in.

    This wouldn't be for everyday shooting. Just some scenes I would love to have a large shot of.

  11. #11
    Ausphotography irregular Mark L's Avatar
    Join Date
    21 Nov 2010
    Location
    magical Mudgee
    Posts
    18,817
    Mentioned
    26 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Not sure about canvas, but sometimes I reckon people stress a little to much about the perfect result. Reckon what you have will turn out well, unless you want to produce a billboard. Then you may have to do things differently.
    Possibly the more important question is, who should you get to do your canvass prints?
    "Enjoy what you can do rather than being frustrated at what you can't." bobt
    Canon 80D, 60D, Canon 28-105, Sigma 150-600S, a speedlite, a tripod, a monopod, a remote release and a padded bag to carry things in.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    15 Jul 2010
    Location
    Forest Lake
    Posts
    1,948
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ausphotography has a very considerately priced Canvas printer as a site sponsor.

    http://www.thecanvasprinters.com.au/

    I personally have printed a 30 x 40 inch print from a 2 megabyte jpg file. It looks great!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •