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Thread: 1st Music Festival - Any suggestions?

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    1st Music Festival - Any suggestions?

    This weekend I will have "access to all areas" at a small (4K +) music festival in Tamworth. It is to be held on a rugby field starts at 1pm finishes at 10pm. I will be taking my D7000 + 17-50 mm 2.8 + 50mm 1.8 + 70-200mm 2.8 (hired). I just thought that I would ask for some advice... any advice really. Was particularly interested in suggestions on composition, where the best places to stand usually are and settings used (generally). I am not getting paid for photos it is just for experience.

    Cheers
    Danny

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    Ausphotography Regular livio's Avatar
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    Hi Danny, Of course there is never a right or wrong answer here but I have a similar camera and I photograph one band in particular of which my eldest son is a member. I have found that pushing the ISO above 3200 on the D7000 can be hit and miss it will depend on the shutter speed you choose to be the minimum and that will depend on how active your subject is. I rarely get good photos unless I'm runnung at 1/125 sec and f2.8 or lower. I have a 50mm AFS f/1.4 lens that is really soft in the focus department I think it has back focus issues. So I'd suggest that you do some testing on the 50mm f/1.8 lens and also the hired 70-200 f/2.8 I have been getting good results at f/5.6 but of course there was plenty of light. My only real advise is make use of the 17-50mm f/2.8 lens this will allow you to get in close and not have too many heads in the way. If you can also get up on stage and shoot from the bands perspective crowd shots are always good and they do give a diffeent perspective. I have had a few where I have shot from directly behind the band and yes while you get the back of the band in the photo you also get to see what they see. I also like to take close ups of the instraments as they are being played a drummer doing his/her stuff at 1/30 sec gives you a great arc of the drum stick and generally a well focused face with little blur. Experiment from the sides, in front behind and if you can above. Take heaps of photos you might get between 5 and 10 keepers from every 100 or so images. Have a spare battery with you it always helps. I have also found that having 2 cameras is better than changing lenses much faster and easier to take take shots with each. Hope this helps to confirm what you already know. Have fun.

    Livio

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    Well, I am guessing danny you have already done and dusted this event by now, not sure if you have posted any images up from it or not...but going from what you said, I recommend the following...

    1.) Leave the 50mm f/1.4 at home. I don't think you should bring fixed lenses to big events. The reason for this in my opinion is that when you are in a confined space, the composition is going to suffer. Arms will go missing off the frame, instruments will disappear in quarters, ears and foreheads will go when you didn't want them to...! So, stick with the 17-55mm f/2.8. It is a great lens! I rarely ever take mine off my D7000 also.

    2.) If you don't have one already, invest in a vertical grip. You don't want to elbow someone in the face when swinging the camera around.

    3.) The 17-55mm is going to serve you well for stage shots. Get as close as you can to the stage and have a go. When dark...be prepared to shoot around ISO3200 and generally at f/2.8...sometimes with shutter speeds as low as 1/30.

    4.) Have a go with even slower shutter speeds! It creates interesting effects if the Muso is keeping still yet their hands are moving around the instrument.

    5.) Learn about rear-curtain sync flash shooting and have a go with it in low light situations.

    6.) The 70-200mm is great for capturing expressions, hand gestures on the instruments - fine detail things.

    7.) Bring a small amount of weather situational gear. A hat, sunscreen, raincoat of some sort, a plastic cover of some sort for your camera....I use a shower cap!

    8.) Try to avoid looking at your backscreen to review images as moments come and go within seconds! Shoot RAW, if you don't know how, learn to. I use to shoot only jpeg, now it's always RAW.

    9.) Approach people for group shots. Look for candids. If it's raining, look for the nutbags that decide to roll around in the mud...they're always great shots.

    10.) Have fun, and take it easy, respect other Photographers there.


    Hope this helps anyone else.

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    Avalanche what a great set of advice. And although you are right about the event being over. I will certainly re read through your suggestions before the next event.

    Cheers

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