User Tag List

Thanks useful information Thanks useful information:  0
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: COlour filters at the top of pictures.

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    10 Dec 2010
    Location
    sydney
    Posts
    463
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    COlour filters at the top of pictures.

    Ok, it is also obvious in movies/shows like top gear.

    I have noticed that the top of the picture seems always darker/coloured.

    Sometimes to black sometimes to something like red.

    So if the top of the picture is mostly "sky" with some clouds, etc..... is it "better" to use a filter to kind of add a looming darkness?
    Last edited by Mr Felix; 09-10-2012 at 7:41pm.
    +===========================================+
    Canon EOS 550D 18-135 (IS) lens 90-300 lens
    +===========================================+

  2. #2
    Administrator ricktas's Avatar
    Join Date
    24 Jun 2007
    Location
    Hobart
    Posts
    15,367
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    "It is one thing to make a picture of what a person looks like, it is another thing to make a portrait of who they are" - Paul Caponigro

    Constructive Critique of my photographs is always appreciated
    Nikon, etc!

    RICK
    My Photography

  3. #3
    Member
    Threadstarter

    Join Date
    10 Dec 2010
    Location
    sydney
    Posts
    463
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks.

    Sorry I didn't go to that thread but I wasn't sure it was for what I was looking.

  4. #4
    Administrator ricktas's Avatar
    Join Date
    24 Jun 2007
    Location
    Hobart
    Posts
    15,367
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    So what are you looking for?

    Filters are used to change the light entering the lens and hitting the sensor. They come in a myriad of version. The ones that "top of the picture is mostly "sky" with some clouds, etc..... is it "better" to use a filter to kind of add a looming darkness?" are graduated filters and yes they can create darkness to the top of the photo, but often they also just balance out the light levels so the limitations of your sensors dynamic range can capture the entire scene without blowing out highlights etc.

    The Nikon D800 has a dynamic range of about 14 stops. The human eye is over 25 stops. The information in that thread link gives a basic idea of filter types and their functions, so I thought it would go some way to answering your question.

    The answer being yes it can, but no it doesn't have to, it depends on what the photographer wants and how they use their filters.
    Last edited by ricktas; 10-10-2012 at 7:20am.

  5. #5
    Member
    Threadstarter

    Join Date
    10 Dec 2010
    Location
    sydney
    Posts
    463
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, I believe it was just a question.

    I had noticed that "Top gear" seem to do it a lot and have noticed it a lot on other shows as well now.

    So: Have I been nieve to it until just now, or has it become the new vogue thing to do?

    I am not really wanting to do much at this stage. As I said, it was more an enquiry to who does it and maybe why.

    There are too many other things happening just now, experimental photography is way off the bottom of the list.

  6. #6
    Sir Rattus79 - The Proclaimant
    Join Date
    15 Jul 2010
    Location
    Forest Lake
    Posts
    1,948
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I believe top gear do it in post, it's just a heavy vignette added to the "film".
    Greg Bartle,
    I have a Pentax and I'm not afraid to use it.
    Pentax K5
    Sigma 10-20 | Tamron 17-50 F:2.8 | Sigma 50 F:1.4 | Sigma 70-200 F:2.8 Plus a bunch of Ye Olde lenses


    Would you like to see more?
    http://flickr.com/photosbygreg

  7. #7
    Administrator ricktas's Avatar
    Join Date
    24 Jun 2007
    Location
    Hobart
    Posts
    15,367
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Now I get what you are asking. CSI also tend to do it, putting a pink/orange glow to the sky.

    Each to their own. It has been done for years. All the blue filters in moves to create a 'night effect', etc.

  8. #8
    http://steveaxford.smugmug.com/ Steve Axford's Avatar
    Join Date
    19 Nov 2007
    Location
    About in the middle between Byron Bay, Ballina and Lismore
    Posts
    2,995
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Movie makers are big users of coloured filters. They use them to create mood. They also use many other effects to create mood, like shutter speed, camera angle, different types of zoom, etc etc. Still photographers tend to use different effects because a) the medium is different b) the viewing setting is different, and c) the viewer has different expectations. It is good to be aware of what movie makers do, but it would be a mistake to think that the effects produced will be the same.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •