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Thread: How do you get prints developed from RAW images?

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    How do you get prints developed from RAW images?

    I have been reading on here a lot about shooting in RAW, so I decided to give it a go. It has only taken me a few days to see the value in it, and pretty much I am a convert already ! BUT how do you use your RAW images to get prints developed ?

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    Administrator ricktas's Avatar
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    You need to convert them. Check with your printer, many only accept JPG, but good ones will take TIF etc as well

    Note that a RAW file is the RAW data from the camera sensor, it is designed to be edited in some way, before printing.
    "It is one thing to make a picture of what a person looks like, it is another thing to make a portrait of who they are" - Paul Caponigro

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    Okay I have figured out how to do that, as in convert to a JPEG, I have seen TIFF before, but not famliar with that is ?

    I noticed that converting one of the RAW images to Jpeg took it down to 12.7 MB , which led me to thinking, how do you maintain the high MB quality ? Or is 12.7MB for instance, large enough to get something like a poster printed from ?

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    It's all about the Light!
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    Please have a look at the workflow article in NTP...
    http://www.ausphotography.net.au/for...t_all_together
    regards, Kym Gallery Honest & Direct Constructive Critique Appreciated! ©
    Digital & film, Bits of glass covering 10mm to 500mm, and other stuff



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    Administrator ricktas's Avatar
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    JPG files will always be smaller than RAW files. TIF files are often larger than RAW files. The trick with JPG for printing is to always use the highest quality settings you can.
    Last edited by ricktas; 04-08-2012 at 7:51pm.

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    Ausphotography irregular Mark L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nazz View Post
    Okay ... Or is 12.7MB for instance, large enough to get something like a poster printed from ?
    I'd say that's Okay
    You need to take into account what DPI you're saving it at. 350 would probably work. Hopefully (and probably) someone will correct me if this wrong.

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    Thanks for the replies. I should clarify, I'm not actually wanting to print a poster of anything... just curious as to what constitutes a high quality image Clearly I have much more to learn still. What does DPI mean ?

    Kym I read that link, but it didn't really answer any of my questions

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    Moderately Underexposed I @ M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nazz View Post
    Or is 12.7MB for instance, large enough to get something like a poster printed from ?
    Don't panic too much over megabytes as far as printing goes. As general rule without involving upscaling software the number of pixels in the image to be printed at is the way to start considering the size that it can be done.

    Those pixels are set in stone in your original image whether recorded in raw, TIFF or JPEP and are only altered by cropping or straightening.

    As an example, a 6 MP camera from a few years ago allows you to have an image measuring 3008 x 2000 pixels and the current 36 MP bodies allow an image of 7360 x 4912 to work with.
    Andrew
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    Arch-Σigmoid Ausphotography Regular ameerat42's Avatar
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    As hinted above, Nazz, you have opened two different Qs here. Actually, three, since you also asked what DPI means.

    Well, easiest 1st: DPI means "Dots Per Inch". But, this simple answer will not open all the doors for you. Use it as a starter. What dots per inch?
    There's an answer for the output from your camera, and there's another answer for what you/anyone will require for printing purposes.

    Now to RAW - actually, just "raw", ie, "unprocessed". Every digital camera captures a "raw" image. It's what your particular sensor "sees" AND HAS RECORDED. Some (simpler) cameras process it straight away to a jpeg only output.
    What can you do with it? Turn it into a generally useful image, such as for printing or displaying almost anywhere in the world.
    How? By trying to retain as much as you can of the USEFUL original information.
    What's this? For a start, the tonal range - brightness levels - that your sensor was able to register, also the colours, and maybe more...
    What file types can do this? The original raw for a start - though its usefulness does not extend much past retaining the original data, otherwise typically, a high bit-depth tiff file, and lastly, a humble - in comparison - jpeg.
    What's a high quality image? One that uses the as much as required of original information. Factors include resolution, tone, and colour.

    Whenever you display/print an image you are limiting the original data you recorded to what the medium can handle. The idea is to make the final output match as closely as possible what the camera recorded. It doesn't always work and it's not always easy.

    Now this is starting to sound didactic, so...
    (Am.)
    CC, Image editing OK.

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    Thanks Andrew that makes sense.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Thanks Ameerat

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nazz View Post
    Thanks for the replies. I should clarify, I'm not actually wanting to print a poster of anything... just curious as to what constitutes a high quality image Clearly I have much more to learn still. What does DPI mean ?

    Kym I read that link, but it didn't really answer any of my questions
    DPI is dots per inch and pretty well meaningless.
    I.e. A pixel is always a pixel, and DPI only 'suggests' what an image should be printed at, it is not enforced.
    The only real meaning of DPI is for a specific output device, i.e. what density it can display or print.

    Workflow: Get used to the idea of a photographic process.
    I.e. take the pic (raw), process/edit the pic (convert from raw to PSD or some non compressed format), publish the pic (JPEG for either print or web as a last step).

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    Thanks Kym Now I get it... promise I'm not blonde

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nazz View Post
    Thanks Kym Now I get it... promise I'm not blonde
    Nel (my lovely wife) is blonde

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    Ausphotography irregular Mark L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kym View Post
    DPI is dots per inch and pretty well meaningless.
    I.e. A pixel is always a pixel, and DPI only 'suggests' what an image should be printed at, it is not enforced.
    The only real meaning of DPI is for a specific output device, i.e. what density it can display or print.
    So when I want to get a print does it matter what DPI I present to the printer?
    I'm learning also.

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    Moderately Underexposed I @ M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark L View Post
    So when I want to get a print does it matter what DPI I present to the printer?
    I'm learning also.
    Mark, if you are having your photos done by commercial print labs rather than "kiosk" machines, the lab will have guidelines ( usually in the file preparation or FAQ pages on their web site ) to tell you what DPI to set your print at before submitting it.

    As an example, RGB Digital have the normal sort of information on their help pages ---- http://www.rgbdigital.com.au/custome...file-prep.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by Weiry View Post
    I@M mentioned a 6MP camera putting out 3008x2000 pixel image... how do you determine what size like in mm or cm you can get from that size raw file?
    As a rough guide you can use an online calculator --- http://web.forret.com/tools/megapixe...08&height=2000 --- to enter your file size in pixels and see their estimation of print sizes.

    However, I firmly believe that figures are just that, purely figures and along with excessive pixel peeping they can lead to mild forms of insanity.
    We have images hanging on our walls that nobody seems to think are anything less than good and they are printed at 20x30 inches from a 10 megapixel camera with no up ressing of the file when processed. Most importantly as well, they haven't been cropped from their original dimensions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by I @ M View Post
    As a rough guide you can use an online calculator --- http://web.forret.com/tools/megapixe...08&height=2000 --- to enter your file size in pixels and see their estimation of print sizes.

    However, I firmly believe that figures are just that, purely figures and along with excessive pixel peeping they can lead to mild forms of insanity.
    We have images hanging on our walls that nobody seems to think are anything less than good and they are printed at 20x30 inches from a 10 megapixel camera with no up ressing of the file when processed. Most importantly as well, they haven't been cropped from their original dimensions.

    30x20 inch with 10MP is easy! You can still go up to 45x30 and a bit more too.

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    Great question Nazz! I've learnt alot from reading through the posts. Got me thinking about printing some work now :P

    Thanks to Nazz and everyone with all the info.
    Lucky

    Canon 60D
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    Sigma 10-20mm EX DC HSM

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