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Thread: Further use for CPL

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    Further use for CPL

    A circular polarising filter is not just for enhancing the colour of the sky, or taking the glare off water, it can also be handy for taking the glare from windows.

    Example #1 is with polariser, #2 is without.

    Just thought I'd share, you never know when it might come in handy.....
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    Member PeterB's Avatar
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    Great demonstration, Harves! Well worth remembering ...

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    LOL! good example

    Also, if you're doing landscapes and the sun isn't really so affecting(cloudy or whatever!) a Polariser can still enhance colors(espcially greens and yellows) and basically render a scene more vivid and warmer too.
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    Quote Originally Posted by arthurking83 View Post
    Also, if you're doing landscapes and the sun isn't really so affecting(cloudy or whatever!) a Polariser can still enhance colors(espcially greens and yellows) and basically render a scene more vivid and warmer too.
    Yeah.... I use one most of the time outdoors, unless the light is too dull

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    I just love the little shopfronts, Looks good.....

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    Looks good Harves, great scene.

    I have always been fascinated by Cross Polarising Photography, but havent ever given it a go, basically you use 2 polarisers, one on the camera, and one behind your subject (usually something plastic as the results are dramatic).

    Here is a link to 'what im talking bout' : http://www.ephotozine.com/article/Cross-polarisation
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    That's a remarkable difference in the window views there Harves, good tip and one I would not of thought of.

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    It definitely works, I used my polariser ages ago when taking photo's of a friends car, it removed most glare/reflections from the paint job and reflections on the windows. It worked well.

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    very interesting. I've always been bothered by the banding in the sky caused by mine.

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    Administrator ricktas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by reaction View Post
    very interesting. I've always been bothered by the banding in the sky caused by mine.
    Polarisers work best at about 90 degrees to the sun. They have their applications and certainly will cause banding if not rotated correctly or aligned to the sun position well. One time never to use a polariser is when doing multiple photos that are going to be stitched into a pano.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ricktas View Post
    Polarisers work best at about 90 degrees to the sun. They have their applications and certainly will cause banding if not rotated correctly or aligned to the sun position well. One time never to use a polariser is when doing multiple photos that are going to be stitched into a pano.
    like i just learnt the hard way!! What NOT to do:



    i still cant even believe i did it.
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    It's all about the Light!
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    Quote Originally Posted by ricktas View Post
    Polarisers work best at about 90 degrees to the sun. They have their applications and certainly will cause banding if not rotated correctly or aligned to the sun position well. One time never to use a polariser is when doing multiple photos that are going to be stitched into a pano.
    Do you mean 90deg as camera facing subject and sun above? or at my left or right shoulder?

    What do you mean by rotated correctly?

    I'm thinking of getting a couple of CPL's so am very interested as to how to use them correctly.

    Thanks!
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    Meaning they work best if the sun is over your right or left shoulder....roughly, but this doesn't always apply. CPL's can be rotated to achieve various levels of light to enter, takes a bit of praactice and trial and error to get the best results.

    As you turn the CPL the sky or subject matter will alter in light and colour intensity, clouds for example will start to look more solid and not as blown looking, colours become much richer. If you turn the CPL so the clouds for example have maximum pop you can at times get what I would refer to as "muddy" hues in the image, but adjusted right and they can make all the difference to a shot.....worthwhile in anyones kit in my opinion.

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    it works on glare anywhere, as i found out last weekend...

    try shooting accross the sun trying to do a portrait with the aperture wide (say 1.8-2.8) of someone wearing white... cpl comes ni really handy to cut glare and light (if you dont have a nd)

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    Quote Originally Posted by ving View Post
    it works on glare anywhere, as i found out last weekend...

    try shooting accross the sun trying to do a portrait with the aperture wide (say 1.8-2.8) of someone wearing white... cpl comes ni really handy to cut glare and light (if you dont have a nd)
    It actually works on reflection off non-metallic surfaces, so water, glass etc. Unfortunately most of the time I want more light so the CPL stays off!

    CPL will also give you uneven saturation like the picture above on UWA lenses due to the polarizing effect strength at different angles to the sun.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kym View Post
    Do you mean 90deg as camera facing subject and sun above? or at my left or right shoulder?

    What do you mean by rotated correctly?

    I'm thinking of getting a couple of CPL's so am very interested as to how to use them correctly.

    Thanks!

    There is a ring on the filter that you can rotate to change the effect of the polarizer (from no effect, basically an ND filter to strong) and this will be reflected (pun intended) in your viewfinder.

    Be aware that as with all filters, CPL filters will reduce light that you get (I'm not sure if the reduction is brand specific or construction specific? There are probably multicoated CPL filters and the like that sacrifices less light)
    Last edited by nexus; 18-10-2009 at 12:31pm.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ricktas View Post
    Looks good Harves, great scene.

    I have always been fascinated by Cross Polarising Photography, but havent ever given it a go, basically you use 2 polarisers, one on the camera, and one behind your subject (usually something plastic as the results are dramatic).

    Here is a link to 'what im talking bout' : http://www.ephotozine.com/article/Cross-polarisation
    Rick, it's known as "Stress Polarization".

    Certain crystals and plastics transmit light in two rays that are polarized at right angles to each other. If photographed through polarizing filters, these crystals or plastics will show interference patterns in vivid colours. When stressed, such as bending or twisting, the play of colours is quite striking.

    It is sometimes used in scientific research to analyse natural stresses in certain shapes by making plastic models during the design phase.

    I read the article at the provided URL and while they described how to achieve the effect, they didn’t really give any information as to what was causing the effect.
    Last edited by GlennSan; 05-11-2009 at 11:30am.
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    Sorry mods - double post in error - pls nuke this one.
    Last edited by GlennSan; 05-11-2009 at 11:30am.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Seesee View Post
    Meaning they work best if the sun is over your right or left shoulder....roughly, but this doesn't always apply.
    Easiest way to remember the area of affect in relation to the sun:

    1. Make a fist.
    2. Point your first finger out and thumb up (like a childs gun).
    3. Aim your pointing finger at the sun, then rotate your thumb around and where your thumb points is the area where you'll get maximum polarizing effect.


    So @ midday - clouds low on the horizon for 360 degreees will leap out of the haze/murk.

    Late afternoon or early morning, the max effect will be above your head and down to the south and north horizons.

    I hope that helps.
    Last edited by GlennSan; 05-11-2009 at 11:39am.

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    All lines lead to Home ... arnica's Avatar
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    You can use CPL's to cut out light so that you can see through water as well ....
    Regards,
    Phil

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    Wow, this thread delivers!

    I just learnt a few of the most useful things you would need to know in regards to using a polarizer.

    Thanks guys

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