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Analog6
28-08-2011, 16:38
Has anyone used a kayak to access areas you cannot get to on foot? At our local wetlands there are lots of islands and I'd love to use a little boat to get in there and just drift and take shots much closer than you can get on the shore.

What type is best? I have seen all different types on the web since I thought of the idea - fishing kayaks, remote area kayaks, sea kayaks, even inflatable kayaks! Is there room to carry equipment? I'm sure it would be a stable enough platform because the spot I have in mind is sheltered and is a dammed part of a creek.

Any advise gratefully received. Its just an idea I'm kicking round at the moment but I'm sure it would work.

Ionica
28-08-2011, 17:00
When staying in the Pittwater area I used a kayak to explore the Hawkesbury River and access areas along the shoreline which were difficult or impossible to reach by land. It was a conventional design, very stable, and ( from memory ), had space to place a small waterproof drum underneath. One extra feature it had was a foot operated rudder, which made it easy to navigate along narrow creeks, overgrown shorelines etc. It was too long ago to be able to give a ' brand ' name, but there may be something similar available still. Hope this is of assistance.

William
28-08-2011, 18:10
:) Odille, I/We Have a Kayak sitting at home doing nothing , It's 4.5 to 5 mtrs long two man with Oars and water tight compartments front and back , Your quite welcome to borrow it for who knows how long , So long as it comes back , You will need two people to carry it to the water , If your interested give me a ring ********** - Bill ;)

BILL: I removed your phone number as this forum is publicly visible and you just put your phone number out there for the world to access. Better to PM personal information to another member: Rick

JM Tran
28-08-2011, 18:29
Hi Odille, I used to own a 1 man sea-going kayak for fitness and fun - the ones with no enclosures and open space with a compartment to store stuff in.

have used it a few times to explore the shipwrecks around Port Adelaide, and overseas too in Asia for caves etc.

I have found that my investment in a waterproof bag is invaluable if you want to carry any sort of camera gear be it in the sea or rivers or lakes - as you will be bound to get a bit wet from splashes etc.

a 2 person kayak is overall better for photography as 1 can be relied on to steer and to avoid danger while you are taking the photos. In Thailand for example, my friend was steering and constantly trying to keep us off the high granite rocks in the sea as I had my water proof bag open and the camera out to take some snaps.

if you are not confident with kayaking, practice first before you try to combine 2 hobbies together:) Below are 3 photos I took when I was on the kayak in Jan, 2 close to the beach as I was pushing off, and 1 in the open sea - off Phi Phi Island, Phuket on new years day

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d84/endless_photography/THANKYOUCARD1-1010085.jpg

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d84/endless_photography/THANKYOUCARD1-1010082.jpg

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d84/endless_photography/THANKYOUCARD1-1010100.jpg

Analog6
28-08-2011, 19:11
Thanks everyone. Bill, I will give you a ring tomorrow, we have a tradie coming in the morning so it may be afternoon.

And I definitely plan to practise before I take the camera out in it! I use a waterproof (Pelican) case with the H2 set up ready' and I can fit the Lumix in there too, so once I have the hang of it the gear should be OK.

William
28-08-2011, 19:16
No worries Odille , Tomorrow arvo give me a ring and come down and have a look , I'll be home , Better being used than sitting on a push trailer doing nothing ;)

Mark L
28-08-2011, 21:11
http://www.ausphotography.net.au/forum/showthread.php?85699-Wee-Adventure :D:D

mpb
28-08-2011, 22:20
I have done a bit of photography from a my Kayak. I have a Tui by Q-kayak. http://www.q-kayaks.co.nz/asp/kayaks.asp?ID=tui . It is a single person touring kayak.
I have not used a fishing kayak, however I suspect these would be idea for photography being more stable and more room for equipment.
The Hobie kayaks have a foot peddle system fishing kayak which would allow you to move leaving your hands free to used the camera. I find it annoying having to juggle the paddle and camera. When there is a breeze sometimes you need to keep reaching for the paddle to keep position and direction for the shot. Also most of the water spary come from my paddle, so when you grab the paddle you run the risk if you dont put the camera in the water proof bag. I use soft waterproof bag which is specifically made for kayaking/boating. these are the type you put your gear in and roll down the top of the bag and then clip each end together.

Some of my observations/ideas.
1. Room is limited. I take one camera with one lens and have to keep it between my legs. The access hatches are generally not accessible from inside the kayak. (touring/sea style)
2. Get a rudder. Some kayaks dont have them and others have them as optional extras.
3. Get drip guards on your paddle.
4. Be aware of the weight of the kayak. Some can be very heavy.

Some samples

http://mpb.smugmug.com/Nature/Birds/DSC00489/969147945_5EBjZ-M.jpg

http://mpb.smugmug.com/Nature/Birds/DSC00523-2/969147970_UuvK7-L.jpg

http://mpb.smugmug.com/Nature/Birds/DSC00560-4/969159159_3CZQS-L.jpg

http://mpb.smugmug.com/Other/Sunsets/DSC03040a/832451025_h4VoW-L.jpg

ving
28-08-2011, 23:24
No kayak but a ten foot punt with a small motor :)
Works ok.

Sent from my TR718D

Analog6
29-08-2011, 08:05
No kayak but a ten foot punt with a small motor :)
Works ok.

Sent from my TR718D

Is that fairly mobile, David. I'd have to take it to and from each time which is why I thought of a kayak, it would have to go in the van

Analog6
29-08-2011, 08:21
I have done a bit of photography from a my Kayak. I have a Tui by Q-kayak. http://www.q-kayaks.co.nz/asp/kayaks.asp?ID=tui . It is a single person touring kayak.
I have not used a fishing kayak, however I suspect these would be idea for photography being more stable and more room for equipment.
The Hobie kayaks have a foot peddle system fishing kayak which would allow you to move leaving your hands free to used the camera. I find it annoying having to juggle the paddle and camera. When there is a breeze sometimes you need to keep reaching for the paddle to keep position and direction for the shot. Also most of the water spary come from my paddle, so when you grab the paddle you run the risk if you dont put the camera in the water proof bag. I use soft waterproof bag which is specifically made for kayaking/boating. these are the type you put your gear in and roll down the top of the bag and then clip each end together.

Some of my observations/ideas.
1. Room is limited. I take one camera with one lens and have to keep it between my legs. The access hatches are generally not accessible from inside the kayak. (touring/sea style)
2. Get a rudder. Some kayaks dont have them and others have them as optional extras.
3. Get drip guards on your paddle.
4. Be aware of the weight of the kayak. Some can be very heavy.

Thanks so much for the detailed reply. The Hobie range look just the thing. Some of theirs look to have plenty of storage (http://www.hobiecat.com.au/fishing/kayaks/outback/) and one of them (http://www.hobiecat.com.au/fishing/boats/pro-angler/index.html) shows someone STANDING in it so they must be stable! I would only take the camera and one lens plus the P&S Lumix - after all it is local so I could go every week if I wanted.

ving
29-08-2011, 13:58
Is that fairly mobile, David. I'd have to take it to and from each time which is why I thought of a kayak, it would have to go in the vani store mine in the garage above cheryls car (one car garage). I have put it on roof racks which isnt too hard but now use a small trailer.